Course Information

US NAVAL ACADEMY COURSES



Course: DM301
Title: MGSP-MENTORS
Credits: 1-0-1
Description: This is a program of learning support provided by qualified and trained upper-class midshipmen for midshipmen enrolled in historically difficult courses in the curriculum. Midshipmen who are very good students may apply to the Academic Center to participate in a leadership role in MGSP. The midshipmen are trained by the Tutorial Programs Director in effective methods for helping other midshipmen. In most cases, the midshipman group study leader will be paired with a regular faculty member who will provide content direction to the leader. In addition to the support they provide other midshipmen, MGSP leaders significantly improve their own understanding of the subject matter and gain leadership experience. MGSP support is currently available in chemistry, calculus, physics, and engineering. Experienced leaders may be elevated to mentors in the program providing guidance to newer members or supervisors assisting in the administration of the program.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: Approval by department whose course the leader supports and Tutorial Programs Director.
Course: EA203
Title: PRINCIPLES OF AEROSPACE ENGINEERING I
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: First course of a two-course sequence covering the fundamentals of aeronautics. Topics in the sequence include the earth's standard atmosphere, basic fluid mechanics, atmospheric flight, airfoils, incompressible and compressible aerodynamics, aerospace structures, propulsion. Knowledge of spreadsheet and writing skills are developed. Hands-on projects on building and flying RC models. This course prepares beginning aerospace engineering students for further studies and develops sound engineering practices.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: SM122 or SM162.
Course: EA204
Title: PRINCIPLES OF AEROSPACE ENGINEERING II
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Second course of a two-course sequence covering the fundamentals of aerospace engineering. See EA203 for the topics covered.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Calculus II.
Course: EA222
Title: MATERIALS FOR AEROSPACE ENGINEERS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An introductory course in materials science and engineering for aerospace engineering majors. Topics include atomic structure and microstructure of materials, physical properties of materials, and broad coverage of the processing, manufacturing, and testing methods utilized in producing materials and structures. Metals, alloys, and composites common in aerospace applications are emphasized. Laboratory demonstrations and exercises used to complement and reinforce the lectures and reading include composite materials manufacturing, mechanical property tests, heat treatments, and NDE/NDI methods.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EM221; SC111 and SC112.
Course: EA301
Title: AERODYNAMICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Covers fundamentals of fluid mechanics: kinematics and dynamics. Conservation equations. Control volume analysis. Inviscid and viscous flows. Momentum theory. Introduction to potential flow theory. Laminar and turbulent boundary layer theories.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EA203, SM221, SM212.
Course: EA303
Title: WIND TUNNEL
Credits: 1-2-2
Description: A laboratory course in wind tunnel test techniques.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: EA301.
Course: EA304
Title: AERODYNAMICS II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Covers elementary potential flows and the method of superposition. Thin-airfoil theory. 2-D Panel methods. Finite-wing theory. Lifting-line and lifting surface theories. Vortex-Lattice methods.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EA301.
Course: EA305
Title: AERO/GAS DYNAMICS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Covers essentials of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. Control volume analysis. Conservation equations in integral form. One-dimensional compressible flow. Converging-only and converging-diverging nozzles. Isentropic flows. Normal and oblique shocks. Fanno and Rayleigh flows.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: (EA203 and EA204); Coreq: EM319.
Course: EA308
Title: ENGINEERING ANALYSIS
Credits: 1-2-2
Description: Applications of numerical theory and analysis to relevant engineering problems is the focus of this course. Topics include: solutions of systems of nonlinear equations, iteration techniques, nonlinear root-solvers, numerical integration and differentiation, and curve-fitting techniques. Applications are used to develop the tools necessary to solve realistic problems.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015, Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None. Coreq: SM212.
Course: EA322
Title: STRUCTURES FOR AEROSPACE ENG
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Fundamentals of analysis and synthesis of air and space vehicle structures. Maneuver load factors and factors of safety. Introduction to linear elasticity and strain energy. St. Venant's theory of torsion in solid and thin-wall sections. Uniaxial and biaxial beam flexure stresses and deflections. Shear flow in torsion and flexure. Combined bending, torsion, and axial loading of thin-wall, stiffened structures used in aerospace vehicles. Basics of finite element stress and deformation analysis. Elastic buckling of columns and buckling load relations for plates and conical shells. Basic fracture mechanics and fatigue concepts. Laboratory and computer work integrated to enhance understanding and provide practical insight.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EM321.
Course: EA332
Title: GAS DYNAMICS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Compressible flow of one-dimensional subsonic flows. Methods of gas dynamics in internal flow systems. Shock waves, waves in supersonic flow, linearized flows.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EA301 and EM319.
Course: EA362
Title: ASTRODYNAMICS I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Introduction to the principles of planetary and satellite motion. Topics include the classical two-body problem, orbital parameters, orbit determination and maneuvers, remote sensing geometry, types of orbits and their uses, constellation design, orbit changes, perturbations and atmospheric drag effects, rendezvous, ballistic missile trajectories, and lunar and interplanetary travel.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EA204.
Course: EA364
Title: SPACECRAFT ATTITUDE DYNAMICS & CONTROL
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Rigid body dynamics and control of spacecraft. Euler angles, inertial properties of rigid and semi-rigid bodies, body-centered equations of motion, torque-free motion. Passive, active, and semi-active attitude controls. Gyroscopes and stable platforms.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EA362 and ES410.
Course: EA365
Title: ROCKET PROPULSION
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: The principles of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics are applied to derive thrust, power, and various efficiencies of propulsion systems. Propeller analysis, cycle analysis, ramjets and rockets are covered. Solid and liquid rockets. Propellants and oxidizers.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EA305, EA332.
Course: EA400
Title: INTRODUCTION TO AERONAUTICS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Introduces students to the applied science of air-breathing atmospheric flight. The course describes airplanes and how they fly from a design and application perspective. Included are topics in fluid dynamics, airfoil and wing theory, aircraft performance, stability, structures, and aircraft design.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015, Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: SM122 or SM162.
Course: EA401
Title: AIRCRAFT PERFORMANCE & DESIGN
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The basic principles for lift and drag calculations are extended to entire flight vehicle analysis. Static and dynamic point performance analysis. Introduction to energy methods with selected optimum climb and trajectory problems. Mission analysis and carpet plots leading to design selection criteria.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Co-req: EA304.
Course: EA401F
Title: PERFORMANCE AND DESIGN OF FIXED-WING AIRCRAFT
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The basic principles for lift and drag calculations are extended to entire fixed-wing flight vehicle analysis. Static and dynamic point performance analysis. Introduction to energy methods with selected optimum climb and trajectory problems. Mission analysis and carpet plots leading to design selection criteria.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prerequisite: EA303 Co-requisite: EA304
Course: EA401R
Title: PERFORMANCE AND DESIGN OF ROTARY-WING AIRCRAFT
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The basic principles for lift and drag calculations are extended to entire flight vehicle analysis. Rotary- wing aerodynamics analysis methods are introduced. Basic principles are applied to vertical lift vehicle static and dynamic performance analysis leading to design selection criteria.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prerequisite: EA303 Co-requisite: EA304
Course: EA413
Title: STABILITY AND CONTROL
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The aerodynamic and inertial forces and moments acting on the flight vehicle and its component parts are analyzed to determine their effect on static and dynamic stability.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EA304. Coreq: ES410
Course: EA414
Title: AIRPLANE SIMULATION AND CONTROL
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Implementaton of linear and non-linear airplane models for man-in-the-loop and batch simulation of airplane flight dynamics. Application of modern control methods to the design of airplane Stability Augmentation Systems and autopilots.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EA413; Coreq: ES410 or equivalent.
Course: EA417
Title: ELEMENTS OF FLIGHT TEST ENGINEERING
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: A lecture and laboratory course designed to provide practical application of theoretical principles learned in courses in flight performance, aerodynamics, and stability and control. Topics include flight test theory and purpose engineering test planning, flight test instrumentation, data analysis, and report writing. Activities include flight simulation, several flights in an aircraft, as well as interaction with naval flight test facilities for test data acquisition and analysis.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EA401 and EA413 and approval of the department chair.
Course: EA421
Title: AEROSPACE STRUCTURES II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Introduction to the finite element methods of structural analysis as applied toatmospheric flight and space flight vehicles. Topics include formulation of the element stiffness matrices, assembly of the global structural matrix, formulation of equivalent loads, energy methods and matrix equation solution methods. A design project using a finite element computer program is carried out.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EA322.
Course: EA424
Title: STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An introductory course in structural dynamics as applied to atmospheric flight and space flight vehicles. Topics include the analysis of free, damped and forced vibrations of systems with one or many degrees of freedom; vibrations of strings, beams and rectangular plates; matrix formulation of equations of motion; introduction to the finite element method of structural dynamic analysis.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EA322.
Course: EA425
Title: VISCOUS FLOW
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An advanced course covering viscous flow problems including laminar, turbulent, incompressible and compressible boundary layers with heat transfer.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EA301.
Course: EA427
Title: AERODYNAMICS III
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An advanced course continuing the study of compressible high-speed flow including general conservation laws for inviscid flows, unsteady flow problems, numerical techniques for supersonic flows and real gas effects. Hypersonic flow.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EA304.
Course: EA428
Title: COMPUTATIONAL AERODYNAMICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Introduction to the major numerical techniques used in computational aerodynamics. Topics include mathematical methods, boundary conditions, stability, panel methods, lattice methods, nonlinear problems, time dependent solutions and transonic flow problems.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EA301.
Course: EA429
Title: FLIGHT PROPULSION
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: The principles of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics are applied to derive thrust, power, and various efficiencies of propulsion systems. Propeller analysis, cycle analysis of air-breathing engines: ramjets, turbojets, turbofans, turboprops, turboshafts. Rocket propulsion.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EA332.
Course: EA430
Title: PROPULSION II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The second propulsion course covers turbomachinery theory including compressors, turbines, pumps, application and design methods. Combustion and cooling techniques in modern engines are introduced.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EA429 or EA365.
Course: EA435
Title: THE AERODYNAMICS OF V/STOL AIRCRAFT
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An advanced course covering the aerodynamics of vertical and short takeoff and landing aircraft, including fixed wing and rotary wing types, with major emphasis on the helicopter.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C, aeronautical track major.
Course: EA439
Title: SPECIAL AIRCRAFT DESIGN
Credits: 1-4-3
Description: This course, along with EA440, provides a two-semester sequence in aerospace design for selected midshipmen.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C standing in aeronautical track.
Course: EA440
Title: AEROSPACE VEHICLE DESIGN
Credits: 1-4-3
Description: Preliminary design of a flight vehicle. Includes preliminary layout, weight and balance estimates, performance analysis, stability analysis and structural analysis.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C, aeronautical track major.
Course: EA461
Title: SPACE ENVIRONMENT
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Introduction to the environment of the upper atmosphere, near Earth space, and interplanetary space. Topics include: properties of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere, the geomagnetic field, radiation belts and magnetosphere of the Earth, the solar wind and interplanetary medium, remote sensing of the atmosphere and oceans, environmental implications for spacecraft design.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: SP212.
Course: EA462
Title: ASTRODYNAMICS II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Advanced topics in astrodynamics including potential of an arbitrary body and of the earth, orbit determination from observations including numerical techniques for data smoothing, special and general perturbations of orbits and interplanetary trajectories, drag effects on low altitude orbits. Special projects.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: EA362.
Course: EA463
Title: SPACE OPERATIONS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course investigates the relationship between mission operations and the other elements of a space mission. It defines a process for translating mission objectives and requirements into a viable mission operations concept. The course focuses on how we get information to and from space and then to the user in a usable format.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EA362.
Course: EA465
Title: SPACECRAFT COMMUNICATIONS AND POWER
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course is intended to develop communications fundamentals with emphasis on digital communications, link budget analysis, and power subsystems. Secondary topics include: computer and data bus operations, command and data handling, telemetry, and tracking and control.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EA362; Coreq: EE302 or EE332.
Course: EA467
Title: SPACECRAFT SYSTEM LABORATORY
Credits: 0-4-2
Description: Laboratory analysis of the major system elements of space systems to include ground control and power, attitude control, communications, propulsion and thermal control. Constraints imposed by system application launch vehicles, and environment are considered. Introduction to the engineering design process as well as its computer adaptations.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: EA465.
Course: EA469
Title: SPECIAL SPACE CRAFT DESIGN
Credits: 1-4-3
Description: This course, in conjunction with EA470, provides a two-semester spacecraft design program for selected midshipmen.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C standing in astronautical track.
Course: EA470
Title: SPACECRAFT DESIGN
Credits: 1-4-3
Description: Preliminary design of a spacecraft. Includes: preliminary layout, weight and moment of inertia estimates, specifications of on-board systems, power subsystem requirements and design, and constraints imposed by launch vehicle and mission requirements.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C standing in astronautical track.
Course: EC244
Title: ELECTRONICS/ELECTROMECHANICS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This course is intended only for students in the Computer Engineering major and introduces them to electronics and electromechanics. Topics covered include amplifiers, comparators, diodes, voltage regulation, bipolar junction transistors, metal oxide field effect transistors (MOSFETs), single- and three-phase power delivery, ideal transformers, DC motors, and AC generators. Problem solving, laboratory exercises, and circuit design are emphasized.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EE221.
Course: EC262
Title: DIGITAL SYSTEMS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Fundamentals in realizing a digital system. Topics covered include Boolean algebra, Karnaugh mapping, flip-flops, state diagrams for system minimization and analysis of sequential and logic function circuits, binary arithmetic, decoders, encoders, multiplexers, and demultiplexers, as well as counter and register design. An introduction to complex programmable logic device (field programmable gate array) systems is provided with applications to projects.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: EC310
Title: APPLICATIONS OF CYBER ENGINEERING
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: The course begins with a brief review of the fundamentals of cyber security, including network architecture, digital signal representation, and digital data transmission. This is followed by terminal-related topics such as assembly level programming, high speed memory, buffer overflow attack, Windows & Linux operating systems, vulnerabilities, and authentication. The core network activities of the OSI model are presented with emphasis on security in a cyber-warfare based environment. Network vulnerability, and hardware and software techniques to protect data are presented. The course ends with wireless topics with emphasis on wireless network security, digital modulation, basic antenna theory, spread spectrum and frequency hopping.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prerequisites: Cyber 1 (SI110) and Physics II (SP212 or SP222), or Dept Chair permission.
Course: EC312
Title: APPLICATIONS OF CYBER ENGINEERING FOR SYSTEMS ENG
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course focuses on concepts of cyber security applied to electronic communication. Students will first concentrate on computer engineering systems and program design to understand cyber vulnerabilities. They will then focus on wired networking at the physical layer whereby the particular Controller Area Network (CAN) specifications will be used to investigate the details and perform attacks on the nodes. Finally, students will be introduced to wireless communication with a focus on wireless network security, including Fourier analysis, filters, gain and noise. In the labs, they will investigate modulation, antennas and propagation. The course ends with eavesdropping, jamming, error correction and encryption in ZigBee and WIFI networks.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: SI110, ES200/202, EE331.
Course: EC356
Title: COMPUTER NETWORKS WITH SECURITY APPLICATIONS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This course provides a foundation in the fundamentals of data and computer communications. Emphasis is placed on protocol and network design within the framework of the TCP/IP network architecture. Critical technical areas in data communications, wide-area networking, and local area networking are explored. Cyber security considerations, vulnerabilities, and solutions are examined at all levels of the network stack.
Offered:
Requisites: Prerequisite: EE353
Course: EC361
Title: MICROCOMPUTER-BASED DESIGN
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: A principles-based foundation to the analysis and design of systems using microprocessors. The student will acquire a detailed understanding of the architecture and instruction set of a representative microcontroller, assembly-language programming of that microcontroller, and the use of interrupts. The student will design and build circuits with both digital and analog components and will learn to use timers, asynchronous serial communications, parallel communications, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters, and pulse-width modulators. The derivation and use of design equations to achieve desired behavior is emphasized.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EC262 or EE313 or EE332 or EE334.
Course: EC362
Title: COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This course covers organization, structure, and design of computers, starting with a review of the history of computers. Design topics include: complex and reduced instruction set design; data addressing; design of central processing units, registers, and arithmetic logic units; circuits to handle interrupts, resets, and other exceptions; horizontal and vertical microprogramming; data busses; memory system design; input/output system design; paging and segmentation; and cache design. A study of computer arithmetic covers two's complement addition and subtraction; Booth's and Robertson's algorithms for signed multiplication; restoring and non-restoring division; square root extraction; and floating-point hardware.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EC262.
Course: EC404
Title: OPERATING SYSTEMS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This is an introductory course covering fundamental concepts and principles of computer operating systems with emphasis on process management including threads, memory management, file system structures, I/O management, system protection, security and distributed computing. Students will engage in a number of programming projects. The first four weeks of the course is devoted to learning the object-oriented Java programming language.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: SI204.
Course: EC415
Title: COMPUTER ENG DESIGN II
Credits: 0-4-2
Description: This course provides practice in computer engineering design, development, and prototype testing. Following approval of the project by the instructor, the student develops a prototype, troubleshoots, and gathers performance data, and completes construction and packaging of the final design. A formal briefing to peers and department faculty follows a written final project report on the completed project in lieu of a final exam.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EE411 and 1/C ECE major or approval of department chair.
Course: EC436
Title: INTRO COMPUTER NETWORKS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This course provides a foundation in the fundamentals of data and computer communications. Emphasis is placed on protocol and network design. Critical technical areas in data communications, wide-area networking, and local area networking are explored.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EE354 or approval of department chair.
Course: EC462
Title: SUPERSCALAR PROCESSOR DESIGN
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Topics essential to modern superscalar processor design are covered: review of pipelined processor design and hierarchical memory design; advanced topics covering a range of processes, techniques and superscalar computer designs.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EC362.
Course: EC463
Title: MICROCOMPUTER INTERFACING
Credits: 2-4-4
Description: This course provides a strong foundation in techniques for connecting computers to peripheral and communications devices and in the methodology for programming the computer to control external devices in real time. This course is supported by a project-oriented laboratory with an opportunity to use a wide variety of computer-controlled peripheral devices. The student will learn the architecture of a representative digital signal processor (DSP) and how to use assembly language to program it. A major emphasis of the course is the in-depth study of interrupt processing, polling, direct memory access, parallel input/output (I/O) protocols, inter-process communication, and modular techniques for designing hardware and software.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: EC262 or EE313 or EE332.
Course: EE221
Title: INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING I
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This course addresses the analysis of linear electric circuits through the application of basic network laws and theorems. The student derives solutions for DC circuits, sinusoidal steady-state circuits, and first- and second-order circuits. Students are introduced to linear integrated circuits such as operational amplifiers and timers. Laboratory exercises where students build and design circuits and use test equipment reinforce course material. Introductory troubleshooting skills and lab notebook maintenance are emphasized. Computer simulation is used throughout the course to support both analysis and design objectives.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Calculus I. For EEE or ECE majors only, or permission of Dept Chair.
Course: EE241
Title: ELECTRONICS I
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: The physics of semiconductor devices (p-n junction diode, bipolar and field effect transistors) is introduced. Device characterization in terms of appropriate external variables then leads to construction of small-signal and large-signal models. Emphasis is on practical electronic circuits such as amplifiers, filters, rectifiers, regulators and switching circuits.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EE221 or EE331.
Course: EE301
Title: ELECTRICAL FUND AND APPL
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Provides an introduction to AC and DC circuit theory appropriate to model shipboard systems. Circuits of resistors, capacitors, inductors and sources are analyzed to predict steady state and first-order transient voltage, current, and power. Impedance matching, filters, transformers, motors/generators, and three-phase power distribution systems are introduced in the context of shipboard application. Laboratory exercises use tools and equipment found in the fleet and allow for a comparison of theoretical and actual circuit performance.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Physics II (SP212 or SP222).
Course: EE302
Title: ELECTRONIC COMM SYS AND DIGITAL COMM
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This course is a follow-on to EE301, Electrical Engineering Fundamentals. This course begins with the basic principles of digital logic circuitry followed by an introduction to computer architecture. The principles of Analog and Digital Communications are presented to include the most common digital modulation techniques and a study of Amplitude Modulation. Radio Wave propagation and the fundamentals of Antennas are also presented. The course ends with a study of the engineering fundamentals of networking including topology, connectivity, routing, bandwidth, subnetting, the OSI Model, TCP/IP, and the Internet as an application of networking concepts.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EE301 or EE331.
Course: EE303
Title: DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course begins with the theory behind radio waves and how they travel as well as antenna fundamentals. Tuned circuits are also discussed along with their applications in communication circuits. The first major focus of the course is amplitude modulation as it applies to radio-frequency communications; frequency modulation is presented as a comparison. The second major focus is methods for converting between analog and digital data for communicating. Also covered are digital modulation, error detection and correction, and mutiplexing techniques. During discussions of each topic, military application and relevance is covered.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: (EE301 or EE331) and CS/IT major.
Course: EE313
Title: LOGIC DESIGN AND MICROPROCESSORS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This is an introductory level project course in digital electronics for non-electrical engineering majors. It begins with the design, analysis and minimization of both combinatorial and sequential circuits and their realization in both discrete components and programmable logic devices. The course then progresses into the uses of MSI devices and digital arithmetic. Finally, an introduction to assembly level programming and microprocessor/microcontroller based systems design is also provided.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EE302 or EE332 or approval of department chair.
Course: EE320
Title: INTRO TO ELECTRICAL ENGR II
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course provides an introduction to the analysis of power systems and rotating machinery. The student applies circuit analysis techniques to solve single-phase and three-phase power problems. Further, the analysis of ideal and non-ideal tranformers, DC machines, and synchronous machines is included. An introduction to power electronic circuits is provided, including DC motor speed control and power supply examples. Problem solving and laboratory exercises are emphasized.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EE221.
Course: EE322
Title: SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: The principles of circuit analysis are extended to the transmission of signals through linear systems. The approach is based on determination and interpretation of natural frequencies, pole-zero diagrams, and their relation to the governing system equations. Transform techniques are applied to the analysis of systems, including circuits. Both continuous-time and discrete-time systems are discussed. Computer software is used to model and analyze signals and systems.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EE241 or EC244 or approval of department chair.
Course: EE331
Title: ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING I
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: A study of DC and AC electrical elements and circuits, including Thevenin equivalence, natural and forced responses of first-order systems, AC power, and AC three-phase systems. Amplifiers, diodes and transistors are introduced and drive discussion of applications in power regulation and machine control. AC and DC machines are investigated and discussed the in the context of a shipboard environment.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Physics II (SP212 or SP222).
Course: EE332
Title: ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING II
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Modeling and analysis techniques are applied to rotating machines, diodes, op amps, transistors, and amplifiers. Amplitude modulation and demodulation and combinational and sequential digital logic are introduced.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EE331.
Course: EE334
Title: ELECTRICAL ENGR AND IT SYSTEMS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This course is a follow-on to EE331, Electrical Engineering I. In this course, modeling and analysis techniques are applied to electronic communication systems including both analog and digital modulation/demodulation techniques. Also in the course,students design and analyzecombinational and sequential digital logic circuits. An in-depth study of computer networking is included with specific emphasis on the OSI model and wireless systems.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EE331.
Course: EE342
Title: ELECTRONICS II
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: BJT and MOSFET amplifiers are studied. This includes the analysis of differential amplifiers, current mirrors, multistage amplifiers, feedback amplifiers, power amplifiers, and integrated circuit amplifiers. Feedback and frequency analysis of amplifiers is emphasized. Applications include active filters and oscillators.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EE241 or approval of department chair.
Course: EE344
Title: SOLID-STATE POWER ELECTRONICS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: The course covers aspects of the analysis, simulation, design, control, and prototyping of power electronic circuits, with an emphasis on industrial and Department of Defense applications. Topical coverage includes rectifiers, dc-dc converters, dc-ac inverters, motor drives, semiconductor device characteristics, and practical issues such as snubbers, drivers, and heat dissipation. Design through mathematical modeling and simulation, followed by implementation and testing, is emphasized.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EE241 or approval of department chair.
Course: EE353
Title: PROBABILITY WITH APPLICATIONS TO ELECTRICAL ENGN
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course is an introduction to probability and stochastic processes with applications to signals encountered in electrical and computer engineering, including communications, signal processing, and digital & computer systems. The course begins with the fundamentals of probability, and then builds on these topics by covering discrete and continuous random variables, functions of random variables, probability and cumulative distribution functions, and law of large numbers. The course finishes with an overview of stochastic processes and their application to communications topics, including correlations, power spectral density, filtering, queuing theory, detection theory, and the design and analysis of communication and network systems.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: SM212 or SM222
Course: EE354
Title: MODERN COMM SYSTEMS WITH CYBER APPLICATIONS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: An introduction to communication systems that focuses on the analysis and design of analog and digital communication systems in a cyber context. Topics include power and energy spectral density, quantization of analog signals, line coding, basic analog and digital modulation techniques, and transmitter and receiver design concepts. Modulation will be analyzed both on the basis of spectral characteristics and performance in AWGN channels. Application of these techniques to practical communication systems will be presented. The course ends with a brief introduction to spread spectrum and wireless communications.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: EE353 & EE322.
Course: EE362
Title: COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This course covers organization, structure, and design of computers, starting with a review of the history of computers. Design topics include: complex and reduced instruction set design; data addressing; design of central processing units, registers, and arithmetic logic units; circuits to handle interrupts, resets, and other exceptions; horizontal and vertical microprogramming; data busses; memory system design; input/output system design; paging and segmentation; and cache design. A study of computer arithmetic covers two's complement addition and subtraction; Booth's and Robertson's algorithms for signed multiplication; restoring and non-restoring division; square root extraction; and floating-point hardware.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EE242.
Course: EE372
Title: ENGINEERING ELECTROMAGNETICS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Basic transmission line theory is introduced with high-frequency circuit design applications. Maxwell's equations are formulated for time-varying fields and applied to waveguide, antenna, and radar systems. Labs provide practical experience with transmission lines, waveguides, optical waveguides, antennas, and radar.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: Physics II (SP212 or SP222).
Course: EE411
Title: ELECT & COMP ENG DESIGN I
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: A series of design problems are presented to take the student through the total design process from specification to verification of performance. In addition to technical design, factors such as safety, economics, and ethical and societal implications are considered. A small project is executed and evaluated. Each student chooses a captone project and develops and submits a proposed design to be completed in EE414 (for electrical engineers) or EE415 (for computer engineers). The proposal is presented to the student's peers and project advisors in lieu of a final exam.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C standing in EEE major or ECE major or approval of department chair.
Course: EE414
Title: ELECTRICAL ENG DESIGN II
Credits: 0-4-2
Description: This course provides practice in engineering design, development, and prototype testing. Following approval of the project by the instructor, the student develops a prototype, troubleshoots, and gathers performance data, and completes construction and packaging of the final design. A formal briefing to peers and department faculty follows a written final project report on the completed project in lieu of a final exam
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EE411 and 1/C EEE major or approval of department chair.
Course: EE420
Title: ELECTRIC MACHINES AND DRIVES
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: The course includes an introduction to magnetic circuits and electromechanical energy conversion principles. Building on these topics, the basic operation, analysis, modeling and design of transformers, dc machines, induction machines, and synchronous machines is then presented. The simulation and power electronic control of dc and ac machines are considered. The output waveforms of a synchronous machine/three-phase rectifier, as part of a dc distribution system, are investigated. The course utilizes both simulation exercises and extensive laboratory hardware exercises to reinforce theory and validate derived models.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EE320.
Course: EE426
Title: FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTATION
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: A practical introduction to the design of electronic instrumentation. Common to all instruments is input from the physical world. Many instruments also entail control of external devices. Students examine a wide range of sensors and actuators. Labs support a broad study of the major components of electronic instrumentation systems: sensors, data acquisition, signal conditioning, computer control, and actuators.
Offered: Fall Or Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EE302 or EE332.
Course: EE431
Title: ADVANCED COMMUNICATION THEORY
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Digital and analog communication systems and concepts. Fourier analysis, sampling theorem, autocorrelation function, power spectrum, cross-correlation function, cross-spectrum, pseudonoise sequences, matched-filters, spread-spectrum, coding, PCM, TDM, and FDM are defined and applied. Probability, random variables, and random-signal principles are used to compute the information content of a message and to compute the error rates in digital communication systems.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EE354 or EE332 or approval of department chair.
Course: EE432
Title: DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Digital signal processing principles are studied and applied to modern radar, sonar, and communication systems. The DFT is introduced, its properties are explored and the FFT algorithm is developed. Discrete correlation, convolution, spectral analysis, matched filter detection problems, complex demodulation techniques, the Z transform, and stability of discrete systems are explored. Properties of FIR and IIR digital filters are studied. Digital filters are designed and applied to random and deterministic signals.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EE322 or EE332 or approval of department chair.
Course: EE433
Title: WIRELESS AND CELLULAR COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS I
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: An in-depth study of wireless and cellular systems. This study includes system design, mobile radio propagation (large-scale path loss, small-scale fading, and multipath), and modulation techniques for mobile radio. A working knowledge of the characteristics of the three major cellular/PCS systems in use in the U.S. today is also developed. Technical discussions of recent topics/publications related to the course material are also conducted. Laboratory experiments emphasize indoor and outdoor RF propagation measurements. A final project is required in lieu of a final examination.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EE354 or approval of department chair.
Course: EE434
Title: WIRELESS AND CELLULAR COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS II
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: A continuation of the in-depth study of wireless and cellular systems. This study includes modulation techniques for mobile radio, equalization, diversity, and channel coding. Small group research projects are conducted in lieu of a final examination.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EE433 or approval of department chair.
Course: EE435
Title: BIOMETRIC SIGNAL PROCESSING
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Digital signal processing methods for multi-dimensional signals are studied and applied to biometric signals (primarily face, fingerprint and iris images or video) for use in determining an individual's identity. Digital image processing in the spatial and frequency domains, in conjunction with pattern recognition techniques, are developed and tested. The students have the opportunity to work hands-on with state-of-the art commercial systems that perform biometric recognition, and become familiar with issues that surround the collection and use of biometric data (such as privacy).
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EE432 or approval of department chair.
Course: EE451
Title: ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES OF SEMICONDUCTORS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course develops an understanding of semiconductor properties and how they determine the performance of semiconductor devices. Hole and electron conduction and charge carrier distribution models are developed. Charge carrier generation and recombination and carrier dynamics leading to drift and diffusion are used to study semiconductor transport phenomena. The p-n junction, bipolar junction transistor, and field-effect transistor are studied in detail.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Physics II (SP212 or SP222) or EE241 or approval of department chair.
Course: EE452
Title: SEMICONDUCTOR ELECTRONICS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This course continues on the foundations developed in EE451 for discrete semiconductor devices. This course will focus on basic analog and digital transistor circuits, and how transistor design affects their performance. Computer-aided transistor circuit design and simulation are emphasized. Solar cells, light-emitting diodes, microfabrication techniques, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are also introduced. The laboratory involves an individual student research project.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EE451 or approval of department chair.
Course: EE472
Title: FIBER OPTICAL COMMUNICATIONS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: An introduction to the nature of optical waveguides and fiber optical communications systems. Fiber propagation modes, dispersion and attenuation are studied. Lightwave transmitters and receivers, optical amplifiers, and components for wavelength division multiplexing are discussed, and a complete optical communication network is analyzed.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EE354 or approval of department chair.
Course: EG471
Title: ENGINEERING DESIGN I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The first course in a two-semester capstone design sequence for General Engineering majors. Topics include the engineering design process, project management, codes and standards. Students form design teams, select a capstone design project and progress through the project definition, proposal, exploratory research, concept selection and preliminary design stages of the project. The capstone design project continues in EM422.
Offered:
Requisites: 1/C General Engineering Major
Course: EG472
Title: ENGINEERING DESIGN II
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Part two of the two-semester capstone design course sequence for General Engineering majors. Students continue with concept selection, detailed design, prototyping and evaluation of their capstone design projects. Formal presentations and reports are prepared to review and document the designs.
Offered:
Requisites: 1/C General Engineering Major; EM421
Course: EM211
Title: STATICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An initial course in applied vector mechanics with emphasis on static equilibrium. Topics include forces, moments, couples, equivalent force-couple systems, centroids, distributed forces, and Coulomb friction. The application of the free body diagram in the analysis of static equilibrium of frames, machines and trusses is stressed.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: Calculus III and Physics I.
Course: EM215
Title: INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Credits: 1-4-3
Description: This is an overview course for majors only that introduces the student to the main areas of mechanical engineering, mechanics, materials, and thermoscience. In addition, it provides background in visualization skills and the design process. Projects are used to enhance the understanding of mechanical engineering and the design process.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None; for ME majors only.
Course: EM217
Title: STRENGTH OF MATERIALS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: A first course in mechanics of deformable bodies with emphasis on the engineering approach to the responses of these bodies to various types of loadings. Topics include stress-strain relationships, stress-strain analysis, stress and strain transformation (Mohr's circle), load-deflection, bending, torsion, buckling, and temperature effects.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EM211; Coreq: SM212.
Course: EM221
Title: MECHANICS FOR AEROSPACE ENGINEERING
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Vector representation of forces, resultant force and moment, equilibrium of concurrent and nonconcurrent forces. Determinate and indeterminate force systems. Area moments and products of inertia. Support reactions and free-body diagrams for simple models of structures. Internal forces and moments in slender members. Cauchy¿s stress, linear strain, and Hooke¿s law for isotropic solids. Axial, bending, and torsion stress and strain in slender members. Axial and hoop stresses in thin-walled pressure vessels. Failure criteria for isotropic material. Laboratory work integrated to enhance conceptual understanding and provide practical insight.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Corequisites: SP211 and SM221
Course: EM232
Title: DYNAMICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Course in classical vector dynamics. Topics include vector algebra and calculus, kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, as well as energy and momentum methods. Extensive problem solving involving particle and rigid body motion is required.
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Requisites: Prereq: EM211 Coreq: SM212.
Course: EM232A
Title: DYNAMICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Course in classical vector dynamics. Topics include vector algebra and calculus, kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, as well as energy and momentum methods. Extensive problem solving involving particle and rigid body motion is required.
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Requisites: Prereq: EM211 Coreq: SM212. Aerospace Engineering Majors only or permission of the Department.
Course: EM300
Title: PRINCIPLES OF PROPULSION
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: A study of the principles of energy conversion, fluid flow and hydraulics applied to naval engineering systems, including the basic operation of steam, gas turbine and internal combustion power plants, as well as heat exchangers, air conditioning, and refrigeration.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Physics I (SP211 or SP221).
Course: EM300N
Title: PRINCIPLES OF PROPULSION/NUCLEAR
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: A study of the principles of energy conversion, fluid flow and hydraulics applied to naval engineering systems, including the basic operation of steam, gas turbine and internal combustion power plants, as well as heat exchangers, air conditioning, and refrigeration. This course also covers nuclear power plant propulsion principles.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Physics I (SP211 or SP221), 3/C cruise.
Course: EM313
Title: MATERIALS SCIENCE
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: An introductory course in the physical and mechanical properties of engineering design materials including metals, ceramics and plastics, their structures, use in engineering applications and failure phenomena. All laboratory projects are structured to provide strong physical illustrations for the topics covered in lectures.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: EM316
Title: THERMO-FLUID SCIENCES I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A first course in thermal systems that covers incompressible fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Topics in fluid mechanics include properties of fluids, fluid statics, integral conservation equations, differential field analysis, dimensional analysis and similitude, incompressible boundary layers, viscous flow in conduits and flow about immersed bodies. Topics in heat transfer include one-dimensional steady conduction, convection and radiation exchange. Heat transfer emphasis is related to heat exchangers and electronics cooling applications.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: SC112; Coreq: SM212
Course: EM317
Title: THERMO-FLUID SCIENCES II
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: A basic thermodynamics course in which the first and second laws of thermodynamics are studied primarily from the classical macroscopic viewpoint and applied to both closed and open systems. Working substances include perfect gases, real gases and vapors in addition to solids and liquids. Thermodynamic cycles are covered with specific reference to internal combustion engines, gas turbine engines, steam power plants and refrigeration. Methods for improving the performance of thermodynamic cycles are discussed including regeneration.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EM316 or EM324.
Course: EM319
Title: ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A basic thermodynamics course in which the first and second laws of thermodynamics are studied primarily from the classical macroscopic viewpoint and applied to both closed and open systems. Working substances include perfect gases, real gases and vapors in addition to solids and liquids. Naval applications are emphasized.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: SM212.
Course: EM320
Title: APPLIED THERMODYNAMICS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Laboratory equipment which operates on principles of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics is used to reinforce analyses and design of gas and vapor power cycles, refrigeration and air conditioning, ship and aircraft propulsion systems, combustion, energy conversion and compressible flow.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EM319 or equivalent.
Course: EM321
Title: MECHANICS/MATERIALS FOR AERO
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Mechanics and Materials for Aerospace Engineers is a first course in materials and mechanics. Topics include: Aerospace material properties; treatments; manufacturing and fabrication processes including jointing; design and selection considerations, including durability repairability maintainability, corrosion and protective treatments; fatigue and creep phenomena; basic elasticity; simple structural element behavior for rods, beams, shafts and plates. Laboratory work and demonstrations are intergrated to show the relevance of the topics and to give practical insight to the behavior of aerospace structural materials and structures.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: EM211.
Course: EM324
Title: FLUID DYNAMICS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: An introductory course in fluid dynamics stressing both the integral and differential forms of the conservation laws of fluid flow. Engineering applications are made to hydrostatics and to ideal and real fluid flows. Laboratory experiments and problems sessions complement the lectures.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: EM319 or equivalent.
Course: EM362
Title: REACTOR PHYSICS I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An introductory course in radiation physics and nuclear reactors. Course covers topics in atomic models, different types of radiation and their interaction with matter, radioactivity, fission process, neutron diffusion, and reactor criticality concepts for bare and reflected homogeneous systems.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: SP212 or SP222.
Course: EM371
Title: INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Fundamentals of mechanical design, with emphasis on the design of pertinent machine elements. Topics such as fasteners, springs, anti-friction bearings, lubrication and journal bearings, gearing and shafts are covered. Also included are static and fatigue failure theories.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EM217 and EM232.
Course: EM375
Title: MECHANICAL ENGINEERING EXPERIMENTATION
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: A design course that emphasizes the theory and practical considerations associated with contemporary experimental procedures, methods and design strategies. Topics include measurement error and its propagation, equation fitting and plotting, signal acquisition and validation, instrument response and elements of experimental design. Emphasis includes computer aided data reduction, modeling of a system and report writing.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: SM212, EM217, and EM232.
Course: EM380
Title: ENGINEERING REVIEW
Credits: 0-2-0
Description: A comprehensive review course to prepare students to take the Engineer-In-Training (EIT) or Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination. Topics include mathematics, chemistry, computers, electrical engineering, engineering economics, statics, dynamics, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and mechanics of materials.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C engineering major.
Course: EM415
Title: HEAT TRANSFER
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Study of thermal radiation, steady and transient conduction, laminar and turbulent convection, internal and external flow, boundary layers and empirical correlations. Applications address fins, nuclear reactor cooling, heat exchangers and interactive computing.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EM319 and EM324.
Course: EM420
Title: PROJECT MANAGEMENT MECH ENG
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Project Management for Mechanical Engineers is an introduction to the fundamentals of project management. Topics include planning projects, schedules, budgets, resources, data analysis, project team dynamics, implementation, execution, performance measurement and closeout.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Engineering major or approval of department chair.
Course: EM423
Title: MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: The treatment of vibration fundamentals including free, damped and forced harmonic vibrations of linear single and multi-degree of freedom systems, modal analysis, continuous systems and a practical project.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EM217 and EM232.
Course: EM424
Title: ANALYTICAL METHODS MECHANICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Review of solution methods to frequently encountered engineering problems such as cylindrical and spherical heat conduction, wave dynamics, boundary layers and vibrations. The solutions methods focus on problems encountered in solid mechanics, fluids mechanics and heat transfer. Includes both analytical and numerical problem solving techniques.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: SM212.
Course: EM433
Title: COMPUTER-AIDED MANUFACTURING
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course examines how computers and automation are used in modern manufacturing processes. Topics include machining processes, CNC prgramming, process planning, dimensioning, and tolerancing. Students particpate in a manufacturing project which utilizes CAD/CAM software to design and manufacture a component using CNC machining equipment.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C engineering major.
Course: EM436
Title: MECHANICS OF COMPOSITE STRUC
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Mechanics of Composite Structures is an introductory course that emphasizes the mechanics of structures containing composite materials. Mechanics topics covered include generalized Hooke's Law, lamina constitutive relationships, lamina strength analysis, micro-mechanics of fiber reinforced lamina, and the mechanics of composite laminates. In addition materials science and manufacturing of composites are covered. A project that requires both the design, manufacture and testing of a composite component or structure concludes this course.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: EM217.
Course: EM441
Title: DIRECTED ENERGY WEAPONS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course will provide students with an introduction to the use of Directed Energy Systems. Topics covered include propagation of directed energy, atmospheric effects and modeling, and simulation of a directed energy beam. In addition, an overview of the technology and analysis needed to understand and design the beam control systems that accomplish acquisition, tracking, and pointing of shipboard lasers will be discussed.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: SM212 and SP212
Course: EM442
Title: COMPUTER-AIDED THERMODYNAMICS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course covers the thermodynamics and heat transfer concepts associated with heat engines and vapor-compression refrigerators and heat pumps employing computer software to conduct the analysis. The software package allows for faster basic solutions and enables the students to conduct optimization and design activities that clearly illustrate enhancements to both basic gas and vapor cycles, as well as more advanced combined and cascaded cycles. Enrollment limited to General Engineering majors. Students may not receive credit for this course and EM320.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EGE major and either EM319 or EM317.
Course: EM443
Title: ENERGY CONVERSION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Fundamentals of applied energy systems including types and sources of energy; forms and methods of energy delivery; and the sectors, magnitude, and use patterns of energy consumption. Focusing on the US national energy situation, topics include energy conversion processes in existing and projected power, transportation, heating and cooling systems, with emphasis on efficiency, economic viability, and environmental impacts. Traditional and nontraditional fuels; nuclear energy systems, alternate energy systems, and methods of energy storage.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EM319 or equivalent.
Course: EM444
Title: SOLAR ENGINEERING
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An introduction to solar energy conversion and utilization. Topics covered include solar radiation, collectors, energy storage, solar heating, solar cooling, photovoltaic converters and wind energy.
Offered: Fall,Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C engineering major or approval of department chair.
Course: EM445
Title: NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: The course examines each of the quantitative sensor-based methods for non-invasively assessing the structural integrity of materials -- metals and composites. The methods covered include sonic, ultrasonic, electro-magnetic, optical and infrared. The important properties of any sensor are its wavelength, beam spread, and resolution and each student will receive a solid understanding of how these three key parameters are used to provide optimal NDE results for understanding material properties as well as detecting internal defects. Labs involve materials imaging, subsurface characterization and imaging, microstructure and properties characterization, and defect characterization in naval and aerospace components.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: SP212, EM313.
Course: EM447
Title: WIND AND TIDAL ENERGY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course will cover wind and water turbine technology including design of turbine blades, analysis of flow regimes and energy conversion. The economics and policies involved in implementing these renewable energy systems will also be studied.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: EM317 or EM319 and EM316, EM324 or EA301.
Course: EM451
Title: DESIGN OF ROBOTIC ELEMENTS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course addresses practical issues concerning the design, fabrication and operation of wheel-driven mobile robots. The objectives of the course are to: (a) Design and fabricate wheel-driven mobile robots to accomplish particular performance objectives, (2) Select typical elements used in robot construction such as electric motors, drive train components, pneumatic components, and sensors, and (3) Develop and test code for a programmable robot controller to incorporate various sensors and enable autonomous operation. The course utilizes a hands-on, project-based approach to learning about robotics.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EM371 or permission of instructor.
Course: EM452
Title: ENGINEERING MATERIALS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course consists of advanced topics in engineering materials, including marine corrosion and design considerations (electrochemistry, corrosion rates, design of protection systems, etc.) and mechanical properties of materials (yield under complex stress state, brittle fracture and temperature effects, fatigue in simple and biaxial stress, and mechanical creep). Review of concepts in solid mechanics (tension/compression, torsion, bending and Mohr's circle) will be included. Enrollment limited to General Engineering majors. Students may not receive credit for this course and EM321, EM371, or EN380.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C EGE major.
Course: EM453
Title: MATERIALS: PROCESSING & FABRICATION
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: State-of-the-art and advanced process and fabrication techniques are examined for metallic, polymeric and composite materials. Aspects of the production of the basic components of material systems are examined. Also, post processing and fabrication thermal treatments to improve the material system will be discussed. The course is directed to proper process and fabrication selection for efficient and safe design of mechanical systems.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EM313.
Course: EM456
Title: CORROSION AND CORROSION CONTROL
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: A course dedicated to the study of various types of corrosion including the electrochemical and metallurgical mechanisms responsible for each and their prevention. The course concentrates principally on the structural alloys used in the marine environment. Laboratory sessions involve demonstrations and hands-on experiements which complement the lecture material.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EM313.
Course: EM461
Title: ENGINES: PRINCIPLES, DESIGN AND APPLICATIONS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: The course objective is to provide a fundamental understanding of reciprocating internal-combustion engine design and operation. This is achieved by linking existing engine hardware design and performance analysis to concepts and disciplines studied in the mechanical engineering curriculum.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EM320 and EM324 or approval of department chair.
Course: EM463
Title: REACTOR PHYSICS II
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: The topics covered include neutron generation times, reactor period, delayed neutrons, negative temperature coefficient, xenon poisoning, control rod theory, shielding and a reactor kinetics case problem.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: EM362.
Course: EM468
Title: NUCLEAR ENERGY CONVERSION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Principles of the conversion of nuclear energy into useful power are covered. Various types of nuclear power plants, their design, cycles, load following characteristics, etc., are studied. Advanced nuclear energy conversion systems, including fusion, are also studied.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: EM362.
Course: EM471
Title: MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN I
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: The first course in a two-semester capstone design sequence. Topics include the engineering design process, project management, codes and standards, engineering ethics, and computer-aided design. Students form design teams, select a captone design project and progress through the proposal and preliminary design stages of the project. The capstone design project continues in EM472.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EM371, ER371, or Dept Chair Approval
Course: EM472
Title: MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN II
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Part two of the two-semester capstone design course sequence. Students continue with concept selection, detail design, prototyping and evaluation of their capstone design projects. Formal presentations and reports are prepared to review and document the designs.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: (EM371 or ER371, and EM471) or approval of department chair.
Course: EM474
Title: GAS TURBINES: DESIGN AND ANALYSIS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: A course designed to acquaint the student with the design and analysis of modern gas turbine engines currently employed by the U.S. Navy. Gas turbine cycles are studied along with the various components that comprise gas turbine engines such as axial and centrifugal compressors, combustors, axial turbines, intercoolers, reheaters, regenerators and inlet/exit diffusers and nozzles. Future concepts in turbomachinery propulsion will be discussed. The course assumes a basic knowledge of thermodynamics and will add to the student's knowledge in such areas as compressible flow in turbomachinery, combustion analysis and emissions control. The culmination of the course is a final design project.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EM320.
Course: EM475
Title: MOTORSPORTS ENGINEERING
Credits: 1-4-3
Description: A design course in which the objective is to build a small formula-style race car based on a set of specifications provided by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). Topics include vehicle dynamics, suspension and steering geometry, engine and drivetrain fundamentals, driver interfaces, fabrication technologies and project management. Students can expect significant hands-on fabrication and assembly experience. The vehicle is completed in EM472 in fulfillment of capstone project requirements.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: EM371, permission of instructor; Coreq: EM471.
Course: EN221
Title: ENGR MECH W/MARINE APPS I
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: First course in two-semester sequence covering the principles of engineering mechanics of rigid and deformable bodies for naval architecture students. Topics in the first course include forces, moments, static equilibrium, stress, strain, stress-strain relations and transformations, torsions in shafts, flexure in beams, column buckling, and temperature effects.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 3/C ENA major.
Course: EN222
Title: ENGR MECH W/MARINE APPS II
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: The second course in a two semester sequence covering the principles of engineering mechanics of rigid and deformable bodies for naval architecture students. Topics in the second course include: generalized Hooke's Law and states of stress, structural failure theories, motion of a point, energy methods, impact loadings, momentum methods, planar kinematics of rigid bodies, energy and momentum in rigid body dynamics and single DOF vibration analysis.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EN221.
Course: EN245
Title: PRINCIPLES OF OCEAN SYSTEMS ENGINEERING
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course introduces new ocean engineering majors to the general problems and design practices in the areas of the ocean environment, coastal engineering, offshore structures, ocean materials, ocean acoustics, and underwater systems. Basic naval architecture principles are also covered, including hydrostatics, stability and buoyancy, and powering. The use of laboratory experiments and computer-aided drafting (CAD), are emphasized.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EOE major or approval of department chair.
Course: EN247
Title: PRINCIPLES OF NAVAL ARCHITECTURE
Credits: 0-4-2
Description: This course, which is intended for midshipmen majoring in naval architecture, provides an overview of topics paramount to ship design. Topics include introductions to engineering design, engineering graphics, numerical methods, buoyancy, ship structures, and marine propulsion systems. A design project is used to provide students with a hands-on experience in designing a simple vessel.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: ENA major or approval of department chair.
Course: EN330
Title: PROBS & STATS W/ OCEAN APPLS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Covers the basic concepts of probability and statistics with the aim of providing an understanding of the probabilistic nature of the forces acting on a marine structure. A statistical representation of the sea surface is developed in order to determine design values for structural loading and vehicle motion.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: SM212 and (EN245 or EN247).
Course: EN342
Title: SHIP HYDROSTATICS AND STABILITY
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Theories and procedures for predicting a ship's hydrostatic response to various conditions are addressed. Methods for computing the stability characteristics of both intact and damaged ships are studied. Floodable length computations are taught. Stability and subdivision criteria are explained. The lines plan for a hull form is developed and analyzed.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: EN245 or EN247.
Course: EN353
Title: RESISTANCE AND PROPULSION
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Topics include dimensional analysis, similitude, wave and viscous resistance of ships, ship-model testing techniques, full-scale performance prediction, momentum theory of propulsive devices, and propeller vibrations and design. This course also covers the experimental aspects of marine vehicle resistance and propulsion.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: (EN245 or EN247) and (EM318 or EM324).
Course: EN358
Title: SHIP STRUCTURES
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: A course in structural theory and practice. Topics include longitudinal and transverse strength of the hull girder, bending moments in a seaway, plate theory, development of ship structural design, Finite Element analysis, and applications of shipbuilding materials.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EM217 or EN222; Coreq: EN353.
Course: EN380
Title: NAVAL MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course addresses the optimal use of materials in ocean systems with emphasis on corrosion prevention, fracture mechanics, and basic materials science.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Chemistry II (SC112 or SC151); Coreq: EM217 or EN222.
Course: EN400
Title: PRINCIPLES OF SHIP PERFORMANCE
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This course is an introduction to the applied science of ship systems. The course describes ships and submarines and how they remain afloat from a design and application perspective. Included are topics in hydrostatics, ship stability and operability, materials, fluid dynamics and propulsion. EN400 is an appropriate substitute for all majors where EN200 is required.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 2/C standing or permission of department chair.
Course: EN401
Title: ENGINEERING IN THE LITTORAL ZONE
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This course is an introduction to engineering principles applied to the near-shore and on-shore environment. Basic engineering mechanics, strength of materials and soil mechanics are studied to provide a base for further investigation. Coastal processes including wave action, sediment transport, beach formation and erosion are discussed. How the combination of such processes and basic mechanics affect such things as small boat hydrostatics, sea-to-shore logistics operations, and coastal structure assessment and construction are studied. 1/C midshipmen having selected (or intending to select) Marine Corps service may substitute EN401 for EN200.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C standing or permission of department chair.
Course: EN411
Title: OCEAN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING I
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: An introduction to basic principles and current issues in environmental engineering as applied to the ocean environment. Topical coverage includes chemical and biological considerations in water quality, diffusion and dispersion in estuaries and oceanic environments, engineering methods used to analyze and mitigate the effects of marine pollution, and environmental ethics and regulatory statutes.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C engineering major or approval of department chair.
Course: EN412
Title: OCEAN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Basic principles and current issues in environmental engineering as applied to the ocean environment are introduced. Principal focus is on ocean resources: their identification, recovery, and utilization. Topical coverage includes the technological aspects of alternate energy sources; deep-ocean oil and gas recovery; desalinization; dredging and uses for dredge spoil; mineral exploitation; ocean depositories; wetlands, reefs and other coastal developments; and environmental economics, ethics, and regulatory statutes.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C engineering major or approval of department chair.
Course: EN420
Title: COASTAL ENGINEERING
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course provides an overview of the methods used to design both shore protection systems and port and harbor structures. Topics include sea level fluctuations, wind-wave forecasting, shallow water wave transformation, sediment transport, littoral processes, "soft engineering" approaches like beach nourishment, and structural design of revetments, groins, jetties, and breakwaters. Emphasis is on the design process using Army Corps of Engineers design manuals.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EN475, 1/C EOE major or approval of department chair.
Course: EN425
Title: OCEAN THERMAL SYSTEMS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Applies the concepts of thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, psychrometrics and heat transfer to ocean systems and ocean environmental control systems. Includes thermal energy conversion to power cycles, including internal and external combustion engines, and gas turbines. Topics covered include refrigeration, air conditioning, heat pumps, incompressible and compressible flow, mass and energy balances, and heat exchanger designs.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: EM319; Coreq: EM324.
Course: EN426
Title: PORT AND HARBOR ENGINEERING
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Covers engineering of marine terminals and small-craft harbors, ship berthing and maneuvering considerations, port navigation, port-related structures, channel design, floating terminals, offshore moorings, dredging, and port security.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: EN245 and EOE major or Dept Chair approval.
Course: EN430
Title: UNDERWATER WORK SYSTEMS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course acquaints the student with design and operational considerations for working in the subsea environment. Topic coverage includes manned submersibles, unmanned remotely-operated vehicles, autonomous underwater vehicles, and deep-dive systems.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C engineering major or approval of department chair.
Course: EN440
Title: DESIGN OF FOUNDATIONS FOR OCEAN STRUCTURES
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course covers basic soil mechanics principles and then applies these to the design of foundation systems, with an emphasis on the unique nature of coastal and ocean conditions. Topics include recommended practices and procedures for planning, designing and constructing adequate foundations for marine structures, including shallow foundations, deep pile foundation, vertical retaining walls, and anchoring systems.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: (EM217 or EN222) and 1/C EOE major or approval of department chair.
Course: EN441
Title: OCEAN ENGINEERING STRUCTURES I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Structural design considerations for fixed ocean structures, such as docks, piers, and steel-jacket structures, are analyzed. Design techniques including matrix methods and finite element analysis are introduced. Boundary conditions, wave effects, foundations, loading and materials considerations are studied.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EM217 or EN222.
Course: EN442
Title: OCEAN ENG STRUCTURES II
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: In this course in structural design theory and practice, basic structural elements of offshore and coastal structures are designed using current engineering design codes. Topics include material properties, connection methods, and the design of steel, composite, and concrete structures.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EN441.
Course: EN445
Title: MARINE FABRICATION METHODS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course presents some of the basic techniques used to fabricate offshore structures and ships. Lecture and lab topics develop an understanding of metal, concrete, and composite construction and quality control methods through the manufacturing and testing of small components representative of those used in the marine environment. An understanding of fabrication specifications is developed through group projects in each material category.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EN380.
Course: EN447
Title: AUTONOMOUS VESSEL DESIGN
Credits: 1-4-3
Description: In this course midshipmen will work as a team to learn and apply the fundamentals of small craft design by performing the design of a small autonomous sail and solar-powered surface vessel.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: ENA major or approval of department chair.
Course: EN448
Title: AUTONOMOUS VESSEL FAB & EVAL
Credits: 1-4-3
Description: In this course midshipmen will work as a team to complete the final design, fabricate, evaluate, and develop a small autonomous sail and solar-powered surface vessel.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: ENA major or approval of department chair.
Course: EN450
Title: ENGINEERING ECONOMIC ANALYSIS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Basic methods and reasons for conducting an engineering economic study are presented. Economic criteria are developed. Procedures for selecting from among a set of technically feasible alternatives are studied. Assumptions and implications associated with these decision-making procedures are discussed.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C engineering major or approval of department chair.
Course: EN452
Title: STRUCTURAL RELIABILITY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course provides an understanding of how reliability methods are used to account for the random nature of the sea when designing ocean and ship structures. Methods for the reliability assessment of structures are presented. The role of reliability methods in the design of structures and as the basis for design codes is discussed. Case studies on the use of reliability methods provide the student with real world applications to complement theoretical studies.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: (EN358 and EN455) or (EN461 and EN475).
Course: EN454
Title: PROJ MGMT FOR OCEAN ENGRS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The course goal: enhance midshipmen project management skills in engineering related situations using quantitative and qualitative methods. Topics covered include relevant decision theories, statistical analysis, inventory control, network concepts, pert diagrams, critical path methods, and risk management.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C NAOE major or approval of department chair.
Course: EN455
Title: SEAKEEPING AND MANEUVERING
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Topics include ship steering, maneuvering, motion and seakeeping. The basic equations of motion for a maneuvering ship and for ship motions in a seaway are developed, and various methods of solution are discussed. The course also covers the experimental aspects of seakeeping and maneuvering.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EN353.
Course: EN456
Title: ADVANCED METHODS IN SHIP DESIGN
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An introduction to computer-aided ship design is presented. Topics include numerical procedures applied to form, stability, resistance, propulsion, motion, maneuvering and strength. .
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: EN353 or approval of department chair.
Course: EN457
Title: HYDROFOIL AND PROPELLER DESIGN
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The analysis and design of hydrofoils and marine propellers are presented. Lifting line and lifting surface theories are applied to naval devices. Design and towing tank work supplements recitations.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EN353 or approval of department chair.
Course: EN458
Title: ADVANCED MARINE VEHICLES
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Modern watercraft discussed include multihulls, planing boats, hydrofoil craft, and surface effect vehicles. Analysis and design features are investigated experimentally in the towing tank when appropriate.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EN353.
Course: EN461
Title: OCEAN SYSTEMS ENGINEERING DESIGN I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Engineering design is introduced as an interdisciplinary activity coupling such subjects as applied probability and statistics, cost assessment, decision-making, economic evaluation, engineering ethics, and project planning. Instruction in hydrographic surveying and profiling, computer-aided drafting, and design report preparation and presentation is included.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C standing in ocean engineering major.
Course: EN462
Title: OCEAN SYSTEMS ENGINEERING DESIGN II
Credits: 1-4-3
Description: The conceptual design of an ocean engineering system is accomplished by midshipmen teams. Projects are selected to match student interest and vary each semester, but normally include such areas as coastal shore protection, marinas, offshore structures, tidal wetlands, artificial reefs, ocean energy systems, underwater vehicles, diving and life support systems. Design teams work independently and integrate detailed engineering design along with other project elements such as proposal writing, project management, cost estimating, report preparation, and oral presentation.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EN461.
Course: EN470
Title: LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEMS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The physiological and psychological aspects of man in the sea are presented with the related engineering requirements. Topics include hyperbaric physiology, saturation diving, life support equipment, deep dive systems, diving operations and hazards.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C engineering major or approval of department chair.
Course: EN471
Title: SHIP DESIGN I
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course introduces the student to the requirements and procedures for accomplishing the design of a ship. The preliminary design of a small monohull displacement ship is developed. Relevant design resources and techniques are used. Prereq: 1/C standing in naval architecture major.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C standing in naval architecture major.
Course: EN475
Title: OCEAN ENGINEERING MECHANICS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This course investigates the properties of ocean surface waves and the effects of ocean waves on fixed and floating ocean structures. Laboratory experiments are an integral part of the course and include measurements of wave heights, fluid velocities and pressures, wave-induced forces and structure motions in waves. Computational skills are also emphasized both through extensive spreadsheet applications and through programming in MATLAB.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EM324, EN245 or approval of department chair.
Course: EN476
Title: SHIP DESIGN II
Credits: 0-6-3
Description: In this course, which represents the culmination of an undergraduate naval architecture program, the student applies engineering skills to the design of a ship.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: EN471.
Course: EN478
Title: SUBMARINE & SUBMERSIBLE DESIGN
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An introductory course in submarine and submersible design with topics in undersea vessel development through exploring historical development, buoyancy and stability, resistance and propulsion, mission requirements, auxiliary systems, structural design, construction methods and modern design approaches.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: ENA or EOE major.
Course: EN503H
Title: HONORS SENIOR THESIS 1
Credits: 1-4-3
Description: This course includes a weekly recitation period which will cover research methodology, literature search, design of experiments, data collection and reduction, report preparation, publication of research, and ethical guidelines for research. In addition, with the guidance of a faculty advisor, students prepare analytical research papers based on a technical topic of their choice. Each student makes an oral presentation of their interim report before the NAOE faculty including their designated thesis committee.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Approval of the department chair.
Course: EN504H
Title: HONORS SENIOR THESIS 2
Credits: 0-6-3
Description: With the guidance of a faculty advisor, students prepare analytical research papers based on a technical topic of their choice. Each student makes an oral presentation of their final report before the NAOE Faculty Honors Committee and external readers.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: Approval of the department chair.
Course: ER301
Title: FUNDAMENTALS OF NUCLEAR ENGINEERING
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An introductory course in the basics of nuclear engineering and radiological sciences. Subject areas include the basics in radiation physics, nuclear plant design, the fuel cycle and radiological health physics.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: SP211 (or equivalent). Coreq: SP212 (or equivalent).
Course: ER313
Title: NUCLEAR MATERIAL SCIENCE
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: An introductory course in physical and mechanical properties of engineering alloys, ceramics and plastics; their microstructures, failure phenomena, and their use in nuclear engineering applications. All laboratory projects are structured to provide strong physical illustrations for the topics covered in the lectures.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: EM217
Course: ER362
Title: REACTOR PHYSICS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Reactor Physics provides the principles underlying power generation in both a steady state and transient fission reactor. Subject areas include neutron diffusion and slowing down theory, criticality, bare, reflected and heterogeneous reactors, reactor kinetics, and reactor control. Experiments and classroom exercises include the determination of important reactor parameters, the use of computational methods, and the use of plant simulation software.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: ER301.
Course: ER371
Title: NUCLEAR PLANT DESIGN
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Fundamentals of nuclear power plant design, with emphasis on basis for light water reactor design. Topics include power reactor economics, design considerations dealing with the nuclear fuel cycle, primary and secondary system components and reactor safety. A term project involving the analysis of a modern nuclear reactor design will be completed.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: ER301.
Course: ER463
Title: RADIATION ENGINEERING
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: An introductory course in basic radiation detection and measurement systems. Subject areas include radiation statistics, data analysis, gas-filled detectors, scintillation detectors, semi-conductor detectors, gamma and charged particle spectroscopy, signal processing and electronics, neutron detection techniques, activation analysis, neutron generators, and radiation detection applications.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: ER301.
Course: ER468
Title: NUCLEAR PLANT ENGINEERING
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Fundamentals of the thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer associated with the design, operation and safety of nuclear power plants are analyzed. Thermal hydraulic fundamentals are applied to the reactor core, primary and secondary systems. Effects of reactor transients are also analyzed.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: ER371.
Course: ES200
Title: INTRO TO SYSTEMS ENGINEERING
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This course acts as an introduction to the discipline of systems engineering, focusing on programming, hardware interfacing, and the development and integration of hardware and software solutions to engineering problems. Using a systems-level, project-based approach, the course also ties together the mathematics, science and technological courses from the core, and introduces the student to the basics of technical communication.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: ESE/ESEH major or approval of the department chair.
Course: ES201
Title: INTRO TO SYSTEMS ENGINEERING
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course acts as an introduction to the discipline of systems engineering, focusing on programming, sensors and actuators, and the development and integration of hardware and software solutions to engineering problems. Using a systems-level, project-based approach, the course also ties together the mathematics, science and technological courses from the core, and introduces the student to the basics of technical communication.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: ESE/ESEH major or approval of department chair
Course: ES300
Title: NAVAL WEAPONS SYSTEMS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An introduction to the theory of weapons systems through a study of the principles of sensor, tracking, delivery and destruction mechanisms.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Calculus II (SM122 or SM162) and Chemistry II (SC112 or SC151) and Physics II (SP212 or SP222).
Course: ES301
Title: SYSTEM MODELING AND SIMULATION
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: The course introduces modeling of physical systems including mechanical, electrical, and fluid systems. Also introduced are standard model representations, such as transfer functions and state space models, along with numerical methods and simulation software. Includes hands-on hardware laboratory exercises.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: ES202 and EM232; Coreq: ES303 or ES303H.
Course: ES303
Title: LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEMS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Analysis and design of linear control systems in the time and frequency domains.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: ES202 and EM232; Coreq: ES301.
Course: ES303H
Title: HONORS LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEMS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Analysis and design of linear control systems in the time and frequency domains. This honors section focuses on deeper analysis of the design toolset and includes an open-ended design project.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: ES202, EM232, ESEH major; Coreq: ES301.
Course: ES304
Title: MODERN CONTROL SYSTEMS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A study of linear systems modeled as continuous-time state equations. Design and analysis of state feedback control systems. Introduction to state estimation and prediction.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: ES301 and (ES303 or ES303H); Coreq: ES308.
Course: ES304H
Title: HONORS MODERN CONTROL SYS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A study of modern advanced control methods for linear systems, including state feedback compensation and state estimation. This honors course focuses on deeper analysis of the modern control toolset and includes an open-ended control design project.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: ES301, ES303H; Coreq: ES308.
Course: ES305
Title: LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEMS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This course provides a foundation in classical control systems covering mathematical modeling, time and frequency response analysis, and design of PID compensators. The lecture material is supported by a series of laboratory projects on the modeling and analysis of physical systems and the design and implementation of control systems for these systems.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: ES202. Coreq: ES301.
Course: ES305H
Title: HONORS LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEMS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This course provides a foundation in classical control systems covering mathematical modeling, time and frequency response analysis, and design of PID compensators. The lecture material is supported by a series of laboratory projects on the modeling and analysis of physical systems and the design and implementation of control systems for these systems. This honors course focuses on deeper analysis of the linear and advanced control toolsets and include an open-ended control design project.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: ES202. Coreq: ES301.
Course: ES306
Title: ADVANCED CONTROL SYSTEMS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course builds upon the foundation established in ES305 and covers the analysis and design of state-space control systems. Specifically, state feedback design control and state estimation methods are presented and supported by a series of laboratory projects on the design and implementation of state-space control systems for physical systems.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: ES301, ES305
Course: ES306H
Title: HONORS ADV CONTROL SYSTEMS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course builds upon the foundation established in ES305H and covers the analysis and design of state-space control systems. Specifically, state feedback design control and state estimation methods are presented and supported by a series of laboratory projects on the design and implementation of state-space control systems for physical systems. This honors course focuses on deeper analysis of the linear and advanced control toolsets and include an open-ended control design project.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: ES301, ES305H
Course: ES308
Title: CONTROL SYSTEMS DESIGN LABORATORY
Credits: 1-2-2
Description: Applied control systems design. Implementation of analog and sample data controllers in laboratory hardware.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: ES303 or ES303H.
Course: ES309
Title: GUIDED DESIGN EXPERIENCE
Credits: 0-4-2
Description: Students pursue a semester-long structured and guided engineering design project, starting from a problem statement and carrying through to a final prototype design. Working in small groups, students participate in a project-based-learning exercise through which they develop the breadth of technical experience required for open-ended design on the large scale.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: ES303 or ES303H, ES301, SM316.
Course: ES360
Title: CONTROL SYSTEMS LABORATORY
Credits: 0-2-1
Description: An introduction to the fundamentals and design of automated control systems. The course develops conceptual understanding and intuition through a series of hands-on laboratory experiences. Topics include systems modeling and simulation tools, time response, feedback and system design for response and stability. Analytical, graphical, and computer techniques are used to emphasize qualitative understanding of systems and techniques that are common to all modern weapon systems.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Calculus II and Chemistry II and Physics II.
Course: ES402
Title: SYSTEMS ENGINEERING DESIGN
Credits: 2-4-4
Description: Introduction to the macro-techniques of engineering design including performance, reliability, management control, redundancy, man-machine systems and testing techniques. Design, construction, test and evaluation of an approved project is accomplished in the lab. Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory are normally sceduled for this course. Each team also meets for an additional two hours of project work each week according to a schedule arranged to accommodate all those involved.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: ES308 and ES405.
Course: ES403
Title: ENGINEERING DESIGN METHODS
Credits: 1-2-2
Description: An introduction to the engineering design process and project management. Also, includes the composition of the proposal for the senior design project.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: ES308.
Course: ES405
Title: APPLIED SENSORS AND ACTUATORS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Introduction to sensors and actuators. The course introduces practical aspects of system design with special emphasis on measuring sensor data and controlling motors. Measurement data processing is covered using statistical tools. Principles of operation and various applications are presented for a number of contemporary sensors and actuators.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: (ES304 or ES304H), ES308, SM316.
Course: ES410
Title: CONTROL SYSTEMS AND THEIR APPLICATION TO WEAPONS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Linear control systems for engineering majors, using analytical, graphical and computer techniques.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Physics II (SP212 or SP222), DE (SM212 or SM222), and Elec Eng I (EE221 or EE331).
Course: ES413
Title: DIGITAL CONTROL SYSTEMS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Analysis, design and simulation of digital filters. Analysis, design and laboratory testing of digital controllers for continuous processes using digital and analog computers and servo system hardware.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: ES308 or ES410.
Course: ES418
Title: OPTIMAL CONTROL & ESTIMATION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Analysis and design of control systems and estimators using optimal control theory.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: ES304 or ES304H.
Course: ES421
Title: INTRO TO COMM & INFO SYSTEMS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Introduction to the tools required to study contemporary communications and information systems. The course introduces analog and digital signals and systems and modern processing tools: convolution, correlation, filtering and spectral analysis. Laboratory experiments emphasize practical aspects of building wireless transmitters and receivers.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C in engineering major or approval of department chair.
Course: ES422
Title: MODERN COMM & INFO SYSTEMS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Introduction to modern communication and information systems. The course introduces amplitude and frequency modulation techniques, analog to digital conversion, the fast Fourier transform (FFT) as well as information system theory and coding: error protection and data compression codes and computer networking. Students are engaged in weekly presentations of current technology used in everyday communication devices. Laboratory experiments concentrate on sampling signals, processing them and transmitting information via modems.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: ES421.
Course: ES430
Title: EMBEDDED MICROCONTROLLER SYS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course builds on previous Systems Engineering computer course work to extend embedded micro-controller software and hardware integration skills. Following reinforcement of software design and programming, the Dynamic C debugger is introduced. Two fundamental new skills are introduced and developed: (1) writing software which directly configures and communicates with Rabbit 3000 internal and external hardware and (2) interrupts and event driven software development.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: ES202
Course: ES432
Title: EMBEDDED MICROCONTROLLER APPLICATIONS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: A deeper understanding of the microcomputer internal architecture and integration into embedded systems applications is provided using the popular PIC18F micro-controller. The micro-controller internal architecture and instruction set is used to strengthen the programmer¿s model of a micro-controller. An introduction to assembly language programming is followed by embedded application development in C. Hardware and software integration labs culminate with a final project.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: ES430 or approval of department chair
Course: ES450
Title: INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTIC SYSTEMS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Fundamentals of robotic systems including historical development, applications, manipulator configuration and design considerations, control principles of robotic systems, fundamental computer vision processing and group design projects. Laboratory exercises utilize networked PCs, various laboratory robot systems, and computer vision systems to investigate theoretical topics introduced during lectures.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 2/C engineering major or approval of department chair.
Course: ES451
Title: MOBILE ROBOT DESIGN
Credits: 1-4-3
Description: An experimentation-based course in the design, analysis, construction, control and programming of autonomous mobile robots. Special topics include locomotion methodologies (including walking machine design), design for terrain, analog robot designs, alternative actuation techniques (Shape Memory Alloys, etc.), microprocessor selection and integration, motion planning, behavior-based program structures, and power supply systems. Eight to ten robots are constructed by each team throughout the semester using standard robotic construction kits. All topics are investigated through experimentation in the laboratory.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: ES450.
Course: ES452
Title: ADVANCED TOPICS IN ROBOTICS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Individual and group open ended investigations of selected advanced topics in the field of robotics, such as: advanced computer vision processing techniques, multiple robot manipulator systems, and artificial neural network systems. Utilizes networked PCs, laboratory robots, computer vision systems. Prereq: ES450 or approval of department chair.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: ES450 or approval of department chair.
Course: ES453
Title: INTRO TO COMPUTER VISION
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: An introductory course covering both theory and application of image processing and pattern recognition techniques used for automation, medical imaging, and remote sensing.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: SI283 or approval of department chair.
Course: ES456
Title: AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Advanced topics in dynamics, control and estimation as they apply to unmanned vehicles. Introduction to specifics of aerial, marine and ground vehicles. Laboratory exposure to navigation hardware and an open ended project.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C ESE major or approval of department chair.
Course: ES461
Title: QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR MANAGEMENT
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An introduction to Operations Research and its application to engineering. Topics include: optimization of engineering systems, game theory, sensitivity analysis, project management with PERT/CPM, and decision analysis. Requires Department Chair approval.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Approval of department chair.
Course: ES462
Title: EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Focuses on skills and toolsets for evaluation of new and emerging technologies using a sociotechnological development model. Includes discussions of basic science, state-of-the-art technologies and current research trends in a variety of emerging areas, including biotechnology, nanotechnology, cybernetics, etc. Credit cannot be received for both ES462 and ES503.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C ESE major or approval of department chair.
Course: ES502
Title: HONORS RESEARCH AND DESIGN
Credits: 1-2-2
Description: Engineering design process and project management geared towards advanced projects associated with the Systems Engineering Honors Major. Includes the composition of the proposal for the honors senior research project.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 2/C ESEH major
Course: ES503
Title: ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course provides students with background and insight into the implications of emerging technologies, focusing on the impact of these technologies from a global, societal perspective. Students use fundamental scientific and engineering skills to analyse state-of-the-art technologies and predict directions of future expansion and application of these systems. Sample topics include nanotechnology, cybernetics, genetic engineering, intelligent highway vehicle systems, etc. Credit cannot be received for both ES462 and ES503.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C ESEH major
Course: FA101
Title: BASIC ARABIC I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Students learn the rudiments of Arabic language proficiency, ending the semester with the ability to have short introductory conversations about self, family and work, and to read and write in Arabic script, and well-prepared to build their skills in the second semester. The majority of class time is conducted in Arabic. Students are supported with video and audio tapes, and significant written and oral work. We focus on the standard language used throughout the Arab World, with significant treatment of the issues of dialectical Arabic.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: FA102
Title: BASIC ARABIC II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Students further develop their Arabic proficiency skills, broadening the range of topics with which they can deal in the language, and deepening their understanding of Arabic grammar and syntax. Students produce Arabic in both oral and written modes, while strengthening their listening and reading abilities. Students become familiar with more complex aspects of Arabic culture through the use of video and audio tapes, with an occasional internet assignment. Students develop the ability to use spoken and written Arabic for a growing set of tasks and situations.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FA101.
Course: FA201
Title: INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Students continue to develop all their skills in Arabic, with longer, more diverse texts, more complex situations, and more challenging oral and written assignments. Students review, strengthen and refine their grasp of Arabic grammar and syntax, and develop vocabulary bases for an ever-broadening set of fields. Arabic broadcasts, films and authentic contemporary texts are used to supplement the textbook.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FA102.
Course: FA202
Title: INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: In this continuation of intermediate Arabic, students suplement their textbook work with a set of sample authentic texts and media from a variety of fields, allowing discussion and writing on more complex ideas, and giving students opportunity to improve all their language skills, and broaden their skill base. The semester culminates with a short written paper and student classroom presentations all delivered in Arabic.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FA201.
Course: FA301
Title: ADVANCED ARABIC I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Using a variety of texts and media, students will work toward greater fluency in spoken and written Arabic. The course, conducted entirely in Arabic, will include reading short stories, articles from the press, film and selections from the Arabic literary heritage. Students will conduct full classroom discussions, write essays and stories, and present results of research in class.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Validation of FA202 or a grade of B or higher in FA202 or approval of department chair.
Course: FA302
Title: ADVANCED ARABIC II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Using exclusively Arabic in the classroom, the students will work toward greater fluency in spoken and written Arabic. The course will include the reading and discussion of a short novel or a piece of Arabic drama, with discussion of pertinent cultural, historical and political dimensions. The course will emphasize growth in grammatical and stylistic sophistication.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: FA301.
Course: FA325
Title: MEDIA ARABIC
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course familiarizes advanced students of Arabic with various forms of popular media, including Arabic newspapers and magazines, television news, internet sites, and radio broadcasts. Students write a series of short essays on topical societal issues using the vocabulary and syntactical structures practiced in class.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FA202 and approval of department chair.
Course: FA342
Title: ARABIC DIALECT
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course familiarizes students of Arabic with one of the major dialects of Arabic spoken in the Arab world. Students learn the basics of speaking in the dialect, as well as sounds, forms, idiomatic vocabulary, and grammatical structures which characterize it. Possible dialects: Syrian (FA342S), Egyptian (FA342G), Palestinian (FA342P), Moroccan (FA342M), Omani (FA342O), Lebanese (FA342L), or others as set by the Arabic faculty. Can be repeated for a different dialect.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FA202 and approval of department chair.
Course: FA350
Title: WINDOW ON ARABIC CULTURE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Using English translations, course explores Arab culture from the Qur'an to current novels and films. Class discusses Arab indentities, intellectual contributions of Arabs, and Arab voices on key issues today. Counts as an upper level Humanities-Social Science course. (Taught in English)
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 or HE112.
Course: FA425
Title: ARABIC DISCOURSE IN SOCIETY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This advanced language course aims to acquaint students with various types of complex Arabic discourse, illustrating aspects of Arabic cultural history, modern Arab societies and cultural movements. Text selections and supplementary audiovisual materials relate to modern and historical political thought, religious thought, cultural criticism, historical investigation, philosophy and literature. Students read and discuss selections in Arabic, analyzing the texts' complex syntactical structures, and evaluating stylistic and rhetorical devices. Writing assignments focus on improving students' composing style, content, and argument structure.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FA202 and approval of department chair.
Course: FA426
Title: MODERN ARABIC LITERATURE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course, conducted completely in Arabic, explores samples of highly acclaimed modern Arabic literature from throughout the Arab world. Students read and analyze works by authors from a broad geographical area extending from Morocco to the Arabic Gulf, and extending in time from 1900 to the present day. Recurring themes in modern and contemporary literature, such as cultural and national identity, colonialism, religion, gender relations, and class conflict, are the bases of discussion of the texts and related writing assignments in Arabic. The course entails reading of short stories, a novella or chapters from a longer novel, and poetry.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FA301 and FA302, or approval of department chair.
Course: FC101
Title: BASIC CHINESE I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The first of a two course sequence using an integrated approach to develop learner's ability to understand, speak, read and write Standard Mandarin Chinese. Communicative skills are developed through various activities in and out of class. Romanized spelling and square characters are taught, as well as pronunciation, sentence structure, and basic vocabulary. Cultural exposure accompanies the development of communicative skills. If taken and passed at USNA, may be used as a free elective by Division I and II majors.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: FC102
Title: FIRST-YEAR CHINESE II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A continuation of FC101. If taken and passed, may be used in place of a 200 level humanities-social science elective in Division I and II majors.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FC101.
Course: FC201
Title: INTERMEDIATE CHINESE I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course continue from the two Basic Chinese courses and provide further training of the learners' all-round ability to understand, speak, read and write Standard Mandarin. While emphasis is still placed on communicative skills, the learners are expected to extend their vocabulary and grammatical knowledge to a more comprehensive level, to the extent that they could readily and appropriately apply this knowledge to the expression of their own ideas as well as the understanding of more native-style oral and written texts. More cultural exposure is involved to facilitate appropriate communication, and more characters are taught to consolidate reading and writing.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FC102.
Course: FC202
Title: SECOND-YEAR CHINESE II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A continuation of Second-Year Chinese I (FC201).
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FC201.
Course: FC301
Title: ADVANCED CHINESE I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The first of a two course sequence which transitions from controlled training in language skills to freer and more authentic communications in Mandarin Chinese. Class activities are purposefully organized and strictly guided. A larger amount of cultural content is loaded in various problem-solving tasks. Character reading and writing are enhanced by the use of dictionaries and by computer input of the Romanized Pinyin system. Daily practice of handwriting and memorization of more characters.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FC202.
Course: FC302
Title: THIRD-YEAR CHINESE II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A continuation of Third-Year Chinese I. See FC301 for a listing of topics.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FC301.
Course: FC350
Title: CHINESE CULTURE THROUGH FILM
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course, taught in English, offers an introduction to Chinese society and culture through feature films, documentaries, and readings. Each film is studied from various theoretical and analytical perspectives. Topics include Chinese historical events, aspects of Chinese culture and society, relationship between tradition and modernity, gender politics, and Chinese nationalism in the era of globalization. The course is one of Hum/SS electives and part of the Regional Studies courses at USNA. Knowledge of Chinese language is not required. Films have English subtitles.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 or equivalent.
Course: FC360
Title: 20TH-CENTURY CHINESE LIT
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course, taught in English, offers a study of modern Chinese identity through literature. The course materials include short stories, plays, poems, and novels by Chinese writers, as well as historical narratives, biographies, and literary criticism by Western scholars. The objectives of the course are to understand history, society and culture of 20th-century China; to learn different critical methods and strategies for analyzing and finding value in literary texts; to understand the concept of the self in traditional and modern Chinese thought, and the relationship between the individual self and Chinese national identity. The course is one of Hum/SS electives. Knowledge of Chinese is not required.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: HE112 or equivalent.
Course: FC401
Title: CHINESE LANGUAGE & CULTURE I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course continues from FC302 to further enhance midshipmen's exposure to Chinese vocabulary, grammar, discourse structure, communicative skills, character reading and writing, as well as their knowledge of Chinese culture. Through a rich variety of topics such as the origin and structure of Chinese characters, homophones and idioms, traditional and simplified characters, the origin of the name of the country, women and marriage, education, birth-control, human rights, religion, myths, and folk tales, midshipmen increase their understanding of China's history and modern life, while gradually moving to comparatively higher levels of proficiency in spoken and written Chinese.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FC302 or equivalent.
Course: FC402
Title: CHINESE LANGUAGE & CULTURE II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course continues from FC401 to further enhance midshipmen's exposure to Chinese vocabulary, grammar, discourse structure, communicative skills, character reading and writing, as well as their knowledge of Chinese culture. Through a rich variety of topics such as the origin and structure of Chinese characters, homophones and idioms, traditional and simplified characters, the origin of the name of the country, women and marriage, education, birth-control, human rights, religion, myths, and folk tales, midshipmen increase their understanding of China's history and modern life, while gradually moving to comparatively higher levels of proficiency in spoken and written Chinese.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FC401 or equivalent.
Course: FC403
Title: CHINESE LANGUAGE & CULTURE III
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: FC403 continues from FC402 to further increase midshipmen's exposure to Chinese vocabulary, grammar, and discourse structure. The course further develops midshipmen's speaking and character recognition skills, as well as knowledge of Chinese culture. Through a rich variety of topics including the origin and structure of Chinese characters, pragmatics, language policies, national identity, and women and marriage, midshipmen gradually move to a more advanced level both in their ability to use Chinese and in their readiness to deal with various cross-linguistic and cross-cultural tasks.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FC402 or equivalent level by validation.
Course: FC404
Title: CHINESE LANGUAGE & CULTURE IV
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: FC404 continues from FC403 to further develop midshipmen's ability in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and their understanding of Chinese culture. Through a rich variety of topics such as education, population policy, human rights, religion and popular culture, midshipmen gradually move to a more advanced level both in their ability to use the target language and in their readiness to deal with various cross-linguistic and cross-cultural communication tasks.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FC403 or equivalent level by validation.
Course: FC411
Title: ADVANCED READING & WRITING I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: FC411 focuses on transition from oral communication about daily routines to reading and writing formal Chinese with sophisticated content and complex sentence structure. Midshipmen learn advanced vocabulary and strategies for more challenging material and engage in regular classroom discussion and composition writing in Chinese based on their reading assignments to enhance their reading and writing skills.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FC404 or equivalent level by validation.
Course: FC412
Title: ADVANCED READING & WRITING II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: FC412 continues from FC411 with the same focus on advanced reading and writing in formal Chinese. The course further enhances midshipmen's ability to process formal written materials with complex structure and more sophisticated ideas. Through reading and writing assignments, the course also prepares midshipmen for communicative tasks in various socio-cultural settings, with an emphasis on both linguistic and stylistic characteristics of formal Chinese.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FC411 or equivalent level by validation.
Course: FC413
Title: ADVANCED READING & WRITING IN CHINESE III
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: FC413, Advanced Reading and Writing in Chinese 3 continues FC412 at the advanced level with the same focus on reading and writing formal Chinese. The course further enhances midshipmen's ability to process formal written materials with complex structure and more refined and sophisticated ideas. Through reading and writing assignments, the course also prepares midshipmen for communicative tasks in various socio-cultural contexts of the target language.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FC412 or validation.
Course: FC414
Title: ADVANCED READING & WRITING IN CHINESE IV
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: FC414, Advanced Reading and Writing in Chinese 4 continues FC413 at the advanced level with the same focus on reading and writing formal Chinese. The course further enhances midshipmen's ability to process formal written materials with more complex structure and refined sophisticated ideas. Through reading and writing assignments, the course also prepares midshipmen for communicative tasks in various socio-cultural contexts of the target language with an emphasis on both linguistic and stylistic characteristics of formal Chinese.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: FC413 or validation.
Course: FC450
Title: STYLES OF DISCOURSE IN CHINESE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course consolidates knowledge and skills students have acquired through previous Chinese courses. It enhances their reading, writing, and aural-oral abilities through studies of different styles of discourses such as stories, advertisements, public notices, public speeches, letters, and interviews. Building on comprehension and expression at the level of single sentences, emphasis is placed on various discourse organization mechanisms such as narratives with sequential or cause-effect arrangements, descriptions of physical environments and personal emotions, and arguments of positions and opinions in different contexts.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FC302 or equivalent.
Course: FC460
Title: CHINESE IN MEDIA
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course develops students' Chinese proficiency at a more advanced level, through work with various forms of Chinese media, including newspaper reports, internet news, TV excerpts and other audio-visual materials. Students expand their vocabulary, enrich their knowledge of grammatical structures and idiomatic expressions, gain greater exposure to written-style Chinese, and increase their comprehension and production of narration, description, and argumentation in both speaking and writing.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FC401 or FC450 or equivalent.
Course: FE210
Title: INTRODUCTORY ECONOMICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A course in elementary economic theory with applications to contemporary problems. Topics include determination of GDP, price theory and market equilibrium, monetary and fiscal policy, unemployment, inflation and international trade.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: FE220
Title: ACCOUNTING
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of accounting. This course will emphasize how general-purpose financial statements communicate information about the business corporation¿s performance and position for users external to management. Approximately half of the course emphasizes how the accountant processes and presents the information and includes exposure to recording transactions, adjusting balances, and preparing financial statements for service and merchandise firms according to established rules and procedures. The remainder of the course examines major elements of the statements of the cash, receivables, inventory, long-lived assets, depreciation, payroll, bonds, and other liabilities and stocks. FE220 is designed for the student who has no prior exposure to accounting. The course covers a wide range of accounting topics. The central objective of the course is to assist students in developing an understanding and appreciation for basic accounting. Cannot be taken for Humanities/Social Science elective.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: FE301
Title: FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A study of the theory and techniques of financial analysis applied in the federal government and industry.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FE210.
Course: FE310
Title: ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Economic Geography provides a systematic understanding of economic growth and the issue of finite limits to improve living standards around the world. The course studies population growth, economic development in underdeveloped countries, pollution and resource depletion, food production and agriculture, patterns of land use, economic justice, Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), social development, the role of government and multinational/international commerce. The course will develop an understanding of the link between the world economy and geography in relation to globalization and economic development.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FE210 or permission of department chair.
Course: FE311
Title: HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Traces the evolution of economic doctrine from the ancients to modern day with emphasis on the period since the 18th century. Reviews the contributions to economic knowledge by Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, Marx, Mill, Marshall, Keynes and others. Various schools of thought, including mercantilism, classical, neo-classical, historical, institutionalism and Keynesianism are examined.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FE210.
Course: FE312
Title: MACROECONOMICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A course on the theories of the aggregate level of income, employment and the price level. Includes discussion of determinants of economic growth, the interaction of the domestic economy with the world economy, and the formulation and impact of monetary and fiscal policy.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FE210.
Course: FE314
Title: INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND POLICY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Study of trade policy, institutions that shape trade policy and the impact of those policies on actual trade patterns, international capital flows and economic conditions and growth in different countries. Covered topics include: different exchange rate regimes and international monetary systems, role of the World Bank and the IMF, protections policies in the form of tariffs, quotas, voluntary exchange restraints and anti-dumping duties, multilateral free trade agreements and regional trade agreements and unions such as NAFTA, APEC and the European Union. (Spring.)
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: FE210 or FP210 or permission of the Economics department chair.
Course: FE315
Title: ECONOMICS OF DEVELOPING NATIONS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Study of the economic characteristics, problems and policies of developing nations, covering economic growth patterns in low income nations, their changing role in the international economic order and the different economic routes being employed toward economic progress. Individual country case studies may also be presented and differences between countries will be analyzed.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FE210 or permission of the department chair.
Course: FE320
Title: COST ACCOUNTING
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A study of concepts and techniques of cost accounting. Primarily concerned with the derivation of production cost arising from materials, labor, services employed and overhead. Cannot be taken for HUM/SS credit. Not offered every year.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: FE220.
Course: FE321
Title: COMPARATIVE SYSTEMS AND TRANSITIONAL ECONOMIES
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The study of the structure and performance of alternative forms of economic organization, capitalist, socialist/communist, and mixed economic systems, and the study of the conversion of socialist systems to capitalism with particular focus on eastern European countries and the former Soviet republics. Not offered every year.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: FE210.
Course: FE331
Title: ECONOMIC STATISTICS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Survey of descriptive and inferential statistical techniques involving more than one variable. Strong emphasis on regression analysis and use of computers.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FE210 and (SM230 or SM239 or SM219).
Course: FE334
Title: FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A study of financial institutions and instruments covering their development and role within the economy and financial system. The forces creating the rapid changes of financial institutions and instruments in the 1980s and 1990s are explored, as well as the regulation of financial institutions and markets.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FE210 or approval of department chair.
Course: FE335
Title: ECONOMICS OF NATIONAL DEFENSE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The application of economic analysis to defense decision-making and the consequences of defense decisions for weapons; volunteers vs. conscription; leaders vs. resource managers; competitive vs. monopoly contractors; pay vs. non-pay factors in reenlistment.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FE210 or approval of department chair.
Course: FE337
Title: ECONOMICS OF THE DEFENSE INDUSTRIAL BASE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Application of economic principles to issues relating to military procurement and contracting, conversion of military industrial capacity to peacetime uses, wartime mobilization of industrial capacity, strategic stockpiling and economic warfare.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FE210.
Course: FE341
Title: MICROECONOMICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course builds upon the fundamentals of microeconomics introduced in FE210, with a particular focus on the optimizing behavior of both firms and individuals. Focus will be not only on learning key microeconomics models, but also applying these models to public policy issues.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FE210 or permission from Department Chair.
Course: FE342
Title: ECONOMIC METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Application of microeconomic principles and analytical tools to the costing of investment projects in both private and public/military contexts.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FE210.
Course: FE345
Title: ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course develops guiding economic principles for decision-making in the environmental arena. Important topics include population growth and the environment, the economics of pollution control, measuring environmental benefits, use and management of renewable and non-renewable resources, environmental justice, and the politics of environmental policy. Not offered every year.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FE210 or permission from Department Chair.
Course: FE354
Title: DEVELOPMENT OF THE U.S. ECONOMY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Economists, politicians, and the news media often draw conclusions about policies today based on their opinions of what happened in the past. This course will use the tools of economics to rigorously analyze the development and evolution of the United States' economy, markets, insitutions, and standard of living. Topics to be studied may include the American Revolution, slavery, the Civil War, Westward expansion, and the Great Depression.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FE210 or approval of department chair.
Course: FE400
Title: ADVANCED MICROECONOMIC THEORY
Credits: 4-0-4
Description: Advanced topics in modern microeconomics. Topics may include dynamic analysis, risk and decision making under uncertainty, general equilibrium analysis, welfare economics, game theory and strategic behavior, principal-agent problems, collective action and social dilemmas, and rational and "irrational" choice.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FE331, FE341.
Course: FE405
Title: ADVANCED MACROECONOMIC THEORY
Credits: 4-0-4
Description: This course is designed as an advanced treatment of modern macroeconomics and policy analysis.  Throughout the course we emphasize the role that imperfections play in the labor, product and financial markets in short, medium, and long run macroeconomics.  The players in the economy -- the central bank, governments, employers, employees, and financial market institutions ¿ operate strategically within a set framework.  The model that we will develop and use is a mainstream monetary macro model used in current research and central banks for policy analysis.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FE312, FE331, FE341.
Course: FE411
Title: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND GROWTH
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course provides a rigorous study of the current issues facing developing countries on both the individual and aggregate level. Discussed topics include economic models of growth, impact of physical and human capital investment, poverty and population growth, trade and globalization, government institutions, international capital flows, foreign aid , growth during times of structural change and reconstruction investment in war-torn societies. Individual country case studies may also be presented and social, political and historical differences between countries will be analyzed.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FE312.
Course: FE412
Title: INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND FINANCE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A rigorous examination of current international issues in a theoretical and empirical framework. Topics include motivations for trade; trade versus protectionism; the multinational enterprise; exchange rate issues and the international monetary systems and the role of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FE312 or FE341.
Course: FE422
Title: LABOR ECONOMICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course analyzes theories of labor markets and evidence on whether and how labor market theories successfully analyze outcomes. The core material explores labor demand by profit-maximizing firms, labor supply decisions made by rational workers, and equilibrium patterns of employment and wages. Topics may include: the analysis of human capital, migration, the economics of discrimination, effects of unions on employment and wages, effects of legislation (such as minimum wages and payroll taxes) and recent trends in wage inequality.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FE341.
Course: FE431
Title: PUBLIC FINANCE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course examines the role of government in a market economy including the use of government expenditures and taxation to change the allocation of resources and/or to change the distribution of income. Emphasis is given to the formation and analysis of public policies in education, health care, social security, welfare, and the environment. Proposals for tax reform and how to address long-term fiscal challenges are analyzed. This course counts as a 400-level elective for economics majors (FEC) and as an economics major elective for the quantitative economics major (SQE).
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FE341.
Course: FE435
Title: MACROECONOMIC FORECASTING
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: As a forward-looking discipline, economists use forecasting as the basis for private sector decision making. Moreover, businesses and governments forecast future revenues and costs. Macroeconomic Forecasting examines the modern, quantitative, statistical-econometric techniques of producing and evaluating forecasts of macroeconomic variables. The course introduces the fundamental techniques to analyze trend, seasonality and cyclical fluctuations, univariate times series methods,and the development of econometric models of the economy.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FE312 and (SM219 or SM230).
Course: FE436
Title: BUSINESS CYCLES
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An advanced treatment of the empirical and theoretical issues surrounding business cycles. Topics include empirical regularities of cycles, models of inventory cycles, labor and credit markets, technology shocks, and the international transmission of cycles. Simulation-based methods of analyzing such models, and the role of fiscal and monetary policy in economic stabilization, are included.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FE312.
Course: FE437
Title: MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An advanced study of topics in monetary economics and their application to macroeconomic issues. Consideration of the role of money as a medium of exchange in commodity and fiat systems. Theories of money demand and empirical measures of the money supply. Development of macroeconomic models of money and the effect of monetary policy on inflation, unemployment and economic growth.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FE312.
Course: FE438
Title: ECONOMICS OF FINANCIAL CRISES
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course explores in depth the causes and consequences of economic and financial crises in general, the contagion of such crises into other countries, and the policies used or proposed to prevent similar crises in the future. It examines numerous historical crises, both theoretically and empirically, in hopes of drawing parallels that may help to guide future economic policy. The course critically examines comments made by so called ¿market experts¿ concerning the crisis and the government¿s response. It also provides a framework for understanding the likelihood of future crises and potential solutions.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: FE210 or FE210Q; FE341 or FE341Q; FE312 or FE312Q.
Course: FE445
Title: ECONOMETRICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Quantification of basic economic theory; multiple regression, correlation and identification techniques for the construction and testing of economic models and a study of selected alternative models of particular economic interest.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FE341, Calculus II, and (FE331 or SM339).
Course: FE450
Title: GAME THEORY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Game theory is the study of strategic behavior in situations where decision makers are aware of the interdependence of their actions. While game theory is widely applicable in social and biological sciences, this course introduces the basic notions of game theory with emphasis on economic applications such as auctions, oligopoly pricing, and entry deterrence. In particular, the course introduces students to the fundamental problems and solution concepts of non-cooperative game theory by examining both simultaneous and sequential move games, static and dynamic games, and games with imperfect, and asymmetric information. This course counts as a 400-level elective for economics majors (FEC) and as an economics major elective for the quantitative economics major (SQE).
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FE341.
Course: FE460
Title: PUBLIC POLICIES TOWARD BUSINESS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An examination of public regulation of private enterprise in the U.S. with emphasis on the rationale for and application of antitrust policy and direct regulation.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FE341.
Course: FE461
Title: INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Industrial organization is the study of industry and firm behavior. Using microeconomic and game theory tools, this course explores the relationships among firms in an industry or across industries by examining the nature of strategic interaction among firms. The course will utilize available computer software to study theoretical models and empirical evidence for a wide variety of market phenomena such as price wars, patent races, price-fixing conspiracies, mergers, and advertising campaigns. It will consider public policies that affect the structure of markets and the behavior of firms, particularly antitrust laws, which try to create a balance between the benefits of coordination and consolidation and the detriments of market power. This course counts as a 400-level elective for economics majors (FEC) and as an economics major elective for the quantitative economics major (SQE).
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FE341.
Course: FE462
Title: INFORMATION ECONOMICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An exploration of the basic theory of information in economics, with special reference to the valuation of information. Students apply microeconomics in solving problems in the allocation, distribution, storage, and transportation of information. Students learn the unique features of markets for information, and the institutional and regulatory environment within which information markets function.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FE341 or FE341Q.
Course: FE475
Title: RESEARCH SEMINAR IN ECONOMICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The Research Seminar in Economics is an introduction to the practical work done by professional economists. Each student applies his/her knowledge of economic theory and quantitative methods to formulate a hypothesis in economic terms, investigate previous research in the specific topice, statistically test its validity, and interpret the policy implications of the results. As the final course in the economics major sequence, the Research Seminar helps to integrate material from several courses, introduces students to the sources of the relevant economics literature, provides practice in reading and critically evaluating quantitative research results, develops competence in use of the computer, and provides a forum for presenting and evaluating the results of student projects.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FEC major or permission of department chair.
Course: FE500
Title: HONORS RESEARCH SEMINAR I
Credits: 2-0-2
Description: Examination of techniques and methodology of social science research; students will choose topics for development in FE506.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C FECH major.
Course: FE506
Title: HONORS RESEARCH PROJECT
Credits: 1-6-4
Description: Directed independent research on topics chosen in FE500. Emphasis on empirical work using microcomputers.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C FECH major.
Course: FF101
Title: BASIC FRENCH I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Develops basic communicative skills, with an emphasis on speaking and listening comprehension.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: FF102
Title: BASIC FRENCH II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Develops basic communicative skills, with an emphasis on speaking and listening comprehension.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FF101.
Course: FF201
Title: INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Continues development of oral, reading, and writing skills using real-life situations. Emphasizes practical, everyday culture of French-speaking world.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FF102.
Course: FF202
Title: INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Continues development of oral, reading, and writing skills using real-life situations. Emphasizes practical, everyday culture of French-speaking world.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FF201.
Course: FF301
Title: ADVANCED FRENCH WITH CIVILIZATION READINGS I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Develops fluency in conversation and facility in reading and writing. Topics emphasize main aspects of Francophone Literatures and Cultures. Taught in French.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FF202.
Course: FF302
Title: ADVANCED FRENCH WITH CIVILIZATION READINGS II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Develops fluency in conversation and facility in reading and writing. Topics emphasize main aspects of Francophone Literatures and Cultures. Taught in French.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FF202.
Course: FF411
Title: DEVELOPMENT OF FRENCH CIVILIZATION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: From the origins to World War II.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FF302 or approval of department chair.
Course: FF412
Title: MODERN FRANCE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: All aspects of contemporary France: geography, economy, institutions, society, politics and culture.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FF302 or approval of department chair.
Course: FF421
Title: REPRESENTATIVE READINGS IN FRENCH LITERATURE I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Class discussions of works by leading writers of various periods. Program includes film versions of several titles. Taught in French.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FF302 or approval of department chair.
Course: FF422
Title: REPRESENTATIVE READINGS IN FRENCH LITERATURE II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Class discussions of works by leading writers of various periods. Program includes film versions of several titles. Taught in French.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FF302 or approval of department chair.
Course: FF432
Title: FRANCE AND THE ARAB WORLD
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: France and the Arab World engages midshipmen in reading, writing, and discussion about France's ties to the Arab world, including colonization and post-colonial political and cultural connections to North Africa and the Middle East. Topics include French immigration policy and North African communities within France, Francophone literature of the Arab world, and the role of spoken and written French in North Africa and Lebanon. Materials include the articles from the Francophone press, fictional narratives, first person memoirs, documentaries, and feature films. Guest speakers in the classroom offer additional insider views and first hand experience of Francophone Arab countries. Conducted entirely in French.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FF302 or approval of department chair.
Course: FG101
Title: BASIC GERMAN I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A beginning course designed to develop communication skills by exposing the student to authentic spoken and written German from the first day of class. The course, aside from stimulating interest in German culture and tradition through authentic materials, prepares the student to cope with real language situations effectively. Equal emphasis is placed on receptive and productive language skills, as well as on communication strategies. Course materials include computer software, video segments (an ongoing story) and authentic film clips.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: FG102
Title: BASIC GERMAN II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Emphasizes the spoken language.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FG101.
Course: FG201
Title: INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Continuation of FG101. Intermediate German sharpens the students' spoken and written communicative skills while fostering grammatical competence and providing insights into the social, cultural, and political realities of the contemporary German-speaking world through multimedia, on-line, and print materials. Classroom activities emphasize the personalized creative use of German in arange of student-centered situations and contexts, including role-playing, debates, and oral reports on cultural topics and current events.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FG102.
Course: FG202
Title: INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Continues development of oral, reading and writing skills. Includes area and cultural topics.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FG201.
Course: FG310
Title: INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY GERMANY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An introduction to the geography and political, economic and social systems of the Republic of Germany, in German. Stresses development of advanced German language skills.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FG202.
Course: FG320
Title: INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LITERATURE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: In German. Stresses development of advanced German language skills.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FG202.
Course: FG411
Title: DEVELOPMENT OF GERMAN CIVILIZATION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Contemporary German society, institutions and national policies.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FG310 or approval of department chair.
Course: FG412
Title: MODERN GERMANY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Reviews main currents of postwar German political history, culture and society.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FG310, FG320 or approval of department chair.
Course: FG421
Title: REPRESENTATIVE READINGS IN GERMAN LITERATURE I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Analysis and discussion of works of leading writers of various periods.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FG320 or approval of department chair.
Course: FG422
Title: REPRESENTATIVE READINGS IN GERMAN LITERATURE II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Analysis and discussion of works of leading writers of various periods.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FG320 or approval of department chair.
Course: FJ101
Title: BASIC JAPANESE I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Beginning Japanese I introduces the contemporary spoken and written Japanese. Emphasis is on developing basic communication skills in listening, speaking, reading and writings. All Kana letters and some Kanji characters are introduced.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: FJ102
Title: BASIC JAPANESE II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Beginning Japanese II introduces the contemporary spoken and written Japanese. Emphasis is on developing basic communication skills in listening, speaking, reading and writings. All Kana letters and some Kanji characters are introduced.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FJ101.
Course: FJ201
Title: INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Intermediate Japanese I aims at further development of communication skills in spoken and written Japanese. More Kanji characters are introduced to prepare students to read authentic written materials such as memos, advertisements, and letters.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FJ102.
Course: FJ202
Title: INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Intermediate Japanese II continues development of communication skills in spoken and written Japanese. Instructions and course materials are presented in Japanese.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FJ201.
Course: FJ301
Title: ADVANCED JAPANESE I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Advanced Japanese I introduces more sophisticated vocabulary and more complex sentence structures required for effective interpersonal communication and interpretation of written texts.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FJ202.
Course: FJ302
Title: ADVANCED JAPANESE II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Advanced Japanese II aims at further development of communication skills. Emphasis is on inculcating knowledge of and sensitivity to the cultural and social context of the language use.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FJ301.
Course: FJ350
Title: JAPANESE CULTURE THROUGH FILM
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course explores Japanese culture through films. A major goal of the course is increasing students¿ knowledge and understanding of Japanese culture. We will explore various cultural topics, including lifestyles (housing, food), social structure (class, occupation), cultural practices (customs, communication styles), and cultural perspectives (values, norms). Midshipmen will also examine their thoughts, feelings, and attitudes toward Japanese culture to uncover perceptions in cultural differences. FJ350 is taught in Japanese.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: FJ202 or instructor's approval.
Course: FJ411
Title: ADV JAPANESE TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETATION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Designed for students pursuing a Japanese minor after starting at an advanced level, this course introduces translation and interpretation of original Japanese literary texts. The texts are selected from various genres, including poems, short stories, and folktales, written in different periods from the 8th to the 20th century. Course content includes brief discussion of the Japanese literary tradition, an introduction to the Old Japanese language and regional dialects, and discussions on social and psychological meanings of the Japanese cultural artifacts and phenomena. The course is conducted in Japanese.
Offered:
Requisites: Prerequisite: FJ202 and by instructor approval
Course: FJ412
Title: ADVANCED JAPANESE CONVERSATION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course aims at further development of communication skills, particularly in listening and speaking. Reading and writing skills are integrated to reinforce the development of listening and speaking skills. Goals include: 1) expression of the student¿s own ideas on selected topics in a coherent and cohesive manner, 2) listening for information to take notes, 3) improving practical ability to read and present extracted information in Japanese. Class will be conducted in Japanese.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: FJ202 or approval of department chair.
Course: FJ420
Title: JAPANESE COMMUNICATION AS A CULTURAL PRACTICE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course provides an in-depth examination of Japanese conversation and culture. Topics that may be covered include: taking turns, appropriate strategies for listening, showing agreement/disagreement, style shifting, telling a story/narrative, and identity construction. For each topic, connections are made to appropriate cultural and conversational actions needed for communication in Japanese. FJ420 is taught in Japanese.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: FJ202 or instructor's approval.
Course: FJ425
Title: MEDIA STUDIES IN JAPANESE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The course teaches advanced reading and writing techniques by analyzing newspaper articles, periodicals, TV news and documentaries. The lectures include useful translation strategies and techniques.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FJ202.
Course: FL220
Title: LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Explores the nature and structure of language, including the study of sound systems (phonetics and phonology), patterns of word formation, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics (meaning in social context). Other topics include cross-cultural differences, language and social identity, the nature of textuality and writing, language processing, and first and second language acquisition.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: HE112.
Course: FL301
Title: INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course explores how different cultures filter and communicate experience through their unique views. As military professionals encounter problems in contact with foreign cultures, communicating effectively with people of different cultural and ethnic backgrounds has become a professional asset. The goal of this course is to increase cultural awareness and competency and to teach communication skills useful for meaningful interaction with foreign cultures. Students will improve communication skills needed today to participate effectively in the growing global community as well as cultural diversity of American society.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HE111.
Course: FL302
Title: INTRO TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology for Military Application introduces midshipmen to the concept of culture from an anthropological perspective for practical applications in military operational environments. It is designed to meet the needs of midshipmen by developing their awareness of and sensitivity to the complexity of culturally motivated behavior.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: HE111
Course: FP130
Title: U. S. GOVERNMENT AND CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Basic concepts of American democracy, the Constitution, political process, structure and functions of national government and factors influencing its operation; emphasis on legal and ethical demands placed on government officials, both civilian and military, as defined by the Constitution and statute.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: FP130X
Title: U. S. GOVERNMENT AND CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The basic concepts of American democracy and the Constitution placed in a comparative context for midshipmen from foreign countries.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: This version of FP130 is for foreign nationals.
Course: FP210
Title: INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Approaches to analysis of international relations; nature and evolution of international political systems; foreign policy decision making; roles of non-state actors; diplomacy and war; Third World economic development; and international institutions.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP220
Title: POLITICAL SCIENCE METHODS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A discussion of the philosophy of science for the political scientist; instruction in research methods with emphasis on scientific method and quantitative techniques.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP230
Title: INTRO TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Introduces midshipmen to the study of politics in other societies. A course in comparative politics offers students a basic framework for analyzing other political systems. Key theoretical concepts, analytical tools and seminal works in the field are introduced to lay the foundation for advanced area studies coursework.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP310
Title: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL STRATEGIC STUDIES
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Examination of the global international system from the strategic perspective to enhance our understanding of the processes and dynamics of global changes and their impact on professional careers in the naval service.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP311
Title: ETHICS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: At the outset, the focus is on a study of the dominant theories of international relations, particularly Bismarkian realism and Wilsonian idealism. Then, using historical and fictional cases, passages from literature, and guest speakers, this course explores case studies that illustrate the ethical dilemmas that arise in the relations between states. By contrast with courses that treat ethical issues for an individual, this course deals with the acts of states and of other groups such as insurgency movements, non-governmental organizations, and international affiliations.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP313
Title: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL POLITICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Effects of information technology on both the national and international political systems; emphasis on changed weaponry, the vulnerability of cyberspace and other aspects of the information revolution on the relations among nations.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: FP210.
Course: FP314
Title: FORMULATION OF U. S. FOREIGN POLICY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Case study-based review of the content, formulation and execution of U.S. foreign policies since World War II, including decision-making processes, administration of policy and development of current policies.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP320
Title: ADV POLITICAL SCI METHODS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Advanced methods for the analysis of quantitative data in political science. Topics include models for binary, count, and ordinal outcomes. Methods are illustrated with published examples from all fields of political science, including studies of conflict, voter behavior, and public opinion. Prepares students to use appropriate methods for empirical research in Honors and Capstone classes.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP220 or approval of department chair.
Course: FP322
Title: COMPARATIVE EUROPEAN POLITICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Study of foreign and domestic policy issues and processes of major European political systems as well as NATO, the European Union, and the U.S.-European relationship.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP323
Title: COMPARATIVE LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Social, economic and political environments; regimes and government institutions and interest groups, political parties, students, church and armed forces; theories of Latin American political behavior with country case studies.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP324
Title: LATIN AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Latin American international subsystem; foreign policy making of Latin American states, United States, Europe, Japan and others; roles of non-state actors; international institutions; diplomacy and violence; and application of international theory.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP325
Title: AMERICAN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The theories and practices of Jefferson, Madison, Lincoln, Calhoun, Martin Luther King and other seminal American political thinkers; special emphasis on societal progress and public policy ambiguity under the banner of Liberty and Equality.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP326
Title: AMERICAN PRESIDENCY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An examination of the presidential selection process and of the nature of presidential power in both the domestic and international spheres, with a focus on the ways in which they are both enhanced and constrained by other actors in the political system, including Congress, the judicial branch, the bureaucracy, the media, and the public.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP328
Title: LEGISLATIVE PROCESS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Decision making in the U.S. Congress; constituencies and elections, role of party and committees, and interaction with executive and judicial branches, bureaucracy, interest groups and other actors.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP335
Title: NON-DEMOCRATIC POLITICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Examination of modern totalitarian and authoritarian regimes as distinct forms of political organization.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP340
Title: MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT AND IDEOLOGY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Introduces students to the components of contemporary political ideas and principles. Course distinguishes among philosophical arguments and social movements and emphasizes how distinction blurred during 20th century. Key concerns include social justice, equality, liberty and rights. Readings range from extremes of anarchism to debates about feminism and environmentalism.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP341
Title: POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Introduction to psychological concepts and approaches used to analyze politics. Topics covered include acquisition of personal political attitudes and beliefs; the dynamics of public opinion; theories underlying PsyOp (Psychological Operations), riots, revolutions and wars; and psychological sources of effective and defective decisions in small group settings such as juries, military commands and policy settings.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP345
Title: ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND SECURITY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Examines major environmental problems currently influencing U.S. domestic and security policies. Explores major theories and public policy controversies related to global warming, pollution, land, air, water degradation and scarcity, and biodiversity. Discusses enduring and novel ethical issues. Special emphasis placed on DoD environmental programs.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP350
Title: POLITICAL ECONOMY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course provides an understanding of the collective action taken by the state and the economy where individuals engage in self interested behavior. It deals with how the state uses power to make decisions about who gets what, when, and how; and how scarce resources are allocated and distributed through the market process. Topics include: the structure of political economy, state-market tensions, economic nationalism, Democracy and Capitalism, and International Trade and Finance.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FP130, FP210.
Course: FP355
Title: CIVIL-MILITARY RELATIONS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An examination of the interplay between civilians and the military in a liberal democratic society. The course blends of theory, practice, policy, sociology, history and political philosophy to examine the relationship of the professional military to the society which it serves. Employs a comparative approach with emphasis on case studies.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP356
Title: CONFLICT AND PEACEMAKING
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This seminar focuses on examining, discussing, and learning how to think critically about the nature of conflicts and the art of peacemaking in the post-Cold War world. It includes lectures, problem-centered learning approaches and discussion sessions. Interactions with experts and a visit to a foreign embassy assist midshipmen in gaining a perspective on conflict management and peacemaking.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP357
Title: POLITICS OF CHINA AND JAPAN
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An examination of the Chinese/Japanese political system with emphasis on the dynamic interaction of traditional and Marxist ideological forces.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP358
Title: POLITICS OF SOUTHEAST ASIA
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course presents a survey of Southeast Asian politics, including Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, and the Philippines. Democratization, political economy, the role of Islam, maritime piracy, and security issues will be examined.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP360
Title: MIDDLE EAST INTERNATIONAL POLITICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: FP360 addresses central issues pertinent to the Middle East such as the sources of conflict in the region, political and economic factors that promote peace and stability, the role of international organizations, and the role of non-state actors. The course also reviews the region's colonial past along with domestic circumstances that affect the influence of the Middle East on global affairs. A careful look at the Bush Doctrine and the rise of terrorism are included. The course counts as an FPSI elective.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP130 and FP210 (or permission of department chair).
Course: FP365
Title: AFRICAN COMPARATIVE POLITICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Analysis of political trends and constitutional development of African political systems; their relations with one another and outside world; attention directed to U.S. security interests in Africa.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP366
Title: AFRICAN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course presents a survey of key actors and relationships in African International Relations and emerging security issues.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: FP367
Title: POLITICS OF RUSSIA AND THE CIS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The development and disintegration of the contemporary Russian political system.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FP130 (FP210 highly recommended).
Course: FP368
Title: COMPARATIVE ASIAN POLITICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Systematic comparative approach to the study of political systems in East and Southeast Asia (with country cases selected from the Koreas, Taiwan, Malaysia, Myanmar, Indonesia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam); theoretical emphasis on ethnic conflict, economic development and democratization.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP369
Title: MIDDLE EASTERN POLITICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Comparative analysis of domestic politics, political economy, the role of religion, foreign policies, and elements of international relations of Middle Eastern political systems; theoretical emphasis on ethnic conflict, conflict resolution and democratic development.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP370
Title: FOREIGN POLICY OF RUSSIA AND CIS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Discussion of geopolitical, ideological, institutional, cultural and economic factors affecting foreign policy decision making in Russian and other members of Commonwealth of Independent States; regional and global issues of security, democracy and free market economics.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP130 (FP210 highly recommended).
Course: FP371
Title: ASIAN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Analysis of interstate relations of selected East and Southeast Asian states; concentration on regional organizations, security alliances and bilateral arrangements.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP372
Title: POLITICAL PARTIES, CAMPAIGNS AND INTEREST GROUPS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Study of dynamics of group politics in the U.S. political system; emphasizes roles played by parties, interest groups, public opinion and elections in the U.S. political process.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP375
Title: POLITICS AND THE MEDIA
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A comprehensive analysis of how print, electronic and computer-based mass media choose, cover, and disseminate information about American politics and government. Analysis of contemporary media from the perspective of subjects, disseminators and consumers of the news.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP384
Title: POLITICS OF IRREGULAR WARFARE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Theoretical, historical and policy examination of low-level political-military confrontation; viewed from several perspectives, such as revolutionary, policy-making, military and nation-state; focus on U.S. response to LIC.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FP130, 2/C.
Course: FP397
Title: CRIMINAL LAW AND JUSTICE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An examination of both (1) the criminal justice system and the requirements of due process as mandated by the Constitution (double jeopardy, coerced confessions, plea bargaining, etc.) and (2) the criminal law -- the nature of criminal intent, the criminal act, the defenses (self-defense, insanity, etc.) as illustrated in such common law felonies as murder, rape, robbery, and battery.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP130, 2/C.
Course: FP403
Title: ADVANCED RESEARCH SEMINAR IN WASHINGTON
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Intensive hands-on introduction to unique research resources of Washington, D.C., such as Library of Congress computer system, Federal Elections Commission Data Base and others; research design, field trips to Washington for data base use and elite interviewing.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C FPS major.
Course: FP407
Title: INTELLIGENCE AND NATIONAL SECURITY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Examination of nature, significance and development of intelligence including collection, counterintelligence, clandestine and covert action and evaluation; includes current issues and case studies.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FP130, FP210, and 1/C or 2/C standing.
Course: FP408
Title: INTERNATIONAL LAW
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Survey of public law of nations including jurisdiction, citizenship, nationality, human rights, and treaty law. This course places special emphasis on the law of the sea, the law of war, and the legal issues involving the use of force by states.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP210.
Course: FP413
Title: CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: FEDERAL SYSTEM
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An analysis of key Supreme Court decisions interpreting the power of the judiciary, the executive and congress under the Constitution; nation-state relations; the commerce power; economic liberties.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP414
Title: CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: CIVIL LIBERTIES
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An analysis of leading Supreme Court decisions in the areas of speech, press, and religion; equal protection of minorities and women; privacy.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP420
Title: PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Analysis of U.S. public policy toward social and economic problems, including nature of social choice; survey of selected policy areas, such as health care, education, housing and economic and social welfare.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP421
Title: NATIONAL SECURITY POLICY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Examination of interaction of domestic and foreign political and military considerations in the formulation and execution of national security policy; use of case studies and review of current strategic policies.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP130, FP210.
Course: FP430
Title: POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Study of Western political philosophy, with emphasis on roots of democracy and the meaning of justice; explores relationship between individual and society, as well as the sources of a state's power and authority; examines works of major thinkers from Plato to the present.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FP130, FP210.
Course: FP437
Title: INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: International organizations in world politics; attention given to control of conflict and violence, economic cooperation and management of global resources; major focus on the United Nations; discussion of selected regional issues and other organizations.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FP130 and FP210.
Course: FP440
Title: POLITICS OF CENTRAL EUROPE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Analysis of the politics of Eastern Europe from a comparative prospective; the struggle for national identity and economic development in the post-communist environment.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FP130.
Course: FP450
Title: INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course examines the histrical and theoretical foundations of contemporary international political economy. It explores the evolving association between government and economics stressing the roles of mercantilism, liberalism and globalization. It explores the political and economic influence of US national agencies as well as international organizations during the latter half of the 20th century.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP210 or instructor permission.
Course: FP468
Title: PALESTINIAN - ISRAELI CONFLICT
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The conflict between Arabs and Jews over Palestine is one of the most important factors shaping Middle East politics. The impact of this conflict affects local Arabs and Jews, regional actors and global partners. To date, the Palestinian-Israeli conflict has produced a series of wars and recurring patterns of violence. This course identifies key actors and motivations in the conflict as well as the conflict's intractability. Peace processes are also a topic of discussion.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP369 or approval of department chair.
Course: FP469
Title: ISLAM AND POLITICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course provides an overview of the relationship between Islam and politics. It covers important political developments in Muslim history: starting with the Prophet Muhammad's time, the establishment of the early Muslim community, the development of the Caliphates, the role of the Shari'ah (Islamic Law), the decline of Islamic societies, and their revival in modern times. Additional attention is given to selected topics, such as contemporary Islamic movements, the status of minorities in Islamic societies, the role of women, and the question of violence.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FP360 or FP369 or approval of department chair.
Course: FP471
Title: CAPSTONE SEMINAR
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The capstone seminar in Political Science provides a directed research experience designed to pull together key elements of the area of concentration. Midshipmen prepare a comprehensive research paper that demonstrates their mastery of substantive knowledge and competence in applying writing and research skills.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C FPS majors only.
Course: FP480
Title: IT RESEARCH SEMINAR (FP)
Credits: 3-0-3
Description:
Offered:
Requisites:
Course: FP500
Title: HONORS ADVANCED RESEARCH DESIGN
Credits: 2-0-2
Description: Advanced research techniques: individual design guidance with special reference to advanced statistical techniques as well as methodological approaches. Literature review and presentation to the faculty.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FPS 2/C honors students only. Honors Director permission required.
Course: FP505
Title: HONORS SENIOR SEMINAR
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An advanced research seminar to carry out the research to culminate in a senior honors thesis.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FP500, 1/C FPSH major.
Course: FP510
Title: HONORS SENIOR THESIS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: An advanced research seminar allowing students to complete the research that will culminate in their senior honors thesis.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C FPSH major.
Course: FR101
Title: BASIC RUSSIAN I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The first of a two course introduction to Russian culture and daily life through the use of communicative approaches to language, with emphasis on listening comprehension and speaking. The courses develop basic reading and writing skills, and provide insights into contemporary society and behavioral norms. If taken and passed at USNA, may be used as a free elective by Division I and II majors.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: FR102
Title: BASIC RUSSIAN II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A continuation of FR101. If taken and passed, may be used in place of a 200 level humanities-social science elective in Division I and II majors.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FR101.
Course: FR201
Title: INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Continues development of oral, reading and writing skills with the emphasison spoken Russian. Includes area and cultural topics.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FR102.
Course: FR202
Title: INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Continues development of oral, reading and writing skills with the emphasison spoken Russian. Includes area and cultural topics.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FR201.
Course: FR330
Title: ADVANCED RUSSIAN WITH CIVILIZATION READINGS I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Further development of communicative skills in Russian. Emphasizes listening, speaking and reading. Knowledge of main socio-cultural periods from 9th through 20th centuries.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FR202.
Course: FR340
Title: ADVANCED RUSSIAN WITH CIVILIZATION READINGS II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Further development of communicative skills in Russian. Emphasizes listening, speaking and reading. Knowledge of main socio-cultural periods from 9th through 20th centuries.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FR202.
Course: FR350
Title: RUSSIAN LIT & CULTURE IN TRANSLATION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course uses English translations of classic Russian texts which impact the way Russians behave and think about themselves today. Through Russian literature, music and film, students gain deep insights into Russian culture. Counts as an upper level Humanities-Social Science course.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: FR411
Title: DEVELOPMENT OF RUSSIAN CIVILIZATION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: From the 10th century to World War II.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: FR340 or approval of department chair.
Course: FR412
Title: MODERN RUSSIA
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The Soviet Union since World War II; social, cultural, economic patterns; technology, armed forces; national policies.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FR340 or approval of department chair.
Course: FR460
Title: ADVANCED RUSSIAN THROUGH FILM
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course uses film as a medium for developing advanced Russian language proficiency while increasing awareness and understanding of Russian culture. Drawing from the canon of well-known Russian film classics, dating from the Soviet period to the present day, the course will explore Russian culture and identity. The canon of popular film will provide students with insight into the evolution of Russian life and society in the Soviet and post-Soviet period. The goal of the course is to help midshipmen improve language skills in all areas, speaking, reading, oral comprehension, and writing, enabling midshipmen to become literate and effective communicators in Russian.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prerequisite: FR340
Course: FS103
Title: BASIC SPANISH I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The first of a two course sequence emphasizing the development of listening and speaking skills in the context of grammar review and with a focus on sophisticated verbal constructions. Both semesters underscore exposure to real cultural materials (readings, video, Internet). The course also incorporates episodes from the video series Destinos.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: One year of senior high school Spanish or approval of department chair.
Course: FS104
Title: BASIC SPANISH II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The continuation of the two course sequence FS103-104 emphasizing the development of listening and speaking skills in the context of grammar review and with a focus on sophisticated verbal constructions. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary building, narration in the past, acquisition of idiomatic constructions, and advanced sentence structures requiring the subjunctive. Both semesters underscore exposure to real cultural materials (readings, video, Internet). The course also incorporates episodes from the video series Destinos.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FS103.
Course: FS201
Title: INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Intermediate Spanish I continues the development of all four language skills--speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing--begun in Basic Spanish. Emphasizes expansion of both active and passive vocabulary, use of more complex language structures and the development of cultural literacy. Taught in Spanish.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FS104.
Course: FS202
Title: INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Intermediate Spanish II continues the development of all four language skills--speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing--begun in Intermediate Spanish I. Emphasizes expansion of both active and passive vocabulary, use of more complex language structures and the development of cultural literacy. Taught in Spanish.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FS201.
Course: FS301
Title: ADVANCED SPANISH WITH READINGS ON CONTEMPORARY SPA
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Develops linguistic proficiency in speaking and writing with readings and videos on Contemporary Spanish-American culture. Includes grammar reviews, internet searches, computer-based materials, newspaper articles, and literary selections that address current issues involving Spanish-speaking nations in this hemisphere.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FS202.
Course: FS304
Title: ADVANCED SPANISH WITH READINGS ON CONTEMPORARY SPA
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Develops linguistic proficiency in speaking and writing with readings and videos on contemporary Spain. Includes grammar reviews, Internet searches, computer-based materials, newspaper articles, and literary selections that address current issues in Spain since Franco. Also includes naval terminology.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: FS202.
Course: FS412
Title: CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Past and current social, economic, cultural and political patterns and problems.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FS301 and FS304, or approval of department chair.
Course: FS413
Title: SPANISH CIVILIZATION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Culture and civilization of Spain from the Roman period through the 20th century supplemented by videos, readings and classroom discussion.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FS301 and FS304, or approval of department chair.
Course: FS421
Title: SPANISH LITERATURE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Representative works such as The Cid and Don Quixote reflecting the culture, ethics and values of Spain in its major literary periods.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: FS301 and FS304, or approval of department chair.
Course: FS422
Title: SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Novels, stories, essays, poetry and plays reflecting the culture, ethics and values of major Spanish American countries from the colonial era to the present.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FS301 and FS304, or approval of department chair.
Course: FX101
Title: ENGLISH FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Alternative to common plebe year courses HE111. Emphasizes writing, American culture and values.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Approval of department chair.
Course: FX102
Title: ENGLISH FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Alternative to common plebe year course HE112. Emphasizes writing, American culture and values.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: FX101.
Course: HE044
Title: PRACTICAL WRITING LABORATORY
Credits: 0-2-1
Description: This course provides intensive, focused instruction in writing grammatically correct and rhetorically effective prose.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Recommendation of ADAA; Coreq: HE344.
Course: HE101
Title: PRACTICAL WRITING
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The study and practice of grammatically correct and rhetorically effective expository prose, supplemented by the analysis of essays by professional writers. For students selected by English Department.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Placement by the department chair.
Course: HE111
Title: RHETORIC AND INTRO TO LITERATURE I
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The first of a two course sequence stressing the writing of rhetorically effective and grammatically correct expository prose. During the first semester students read essays, short stories and plays, and they write brief essays. During the second semester students read novels and poetry and write longer essays.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: HE112
Title: RHETORIC AND INTRO TO LIT II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Continuation of HE111. See HE111 for a listing of topics.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: HE111.
Course: HE217
Title: EARLY WESTERN LITERATURE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A balanced survey of the Western literary tradition and its backgrounds, from the ancient Greece through the Middle Ages. Readings may include classical Greek and Roman epic, drama, and philosophy; selections from the Bible; and medieval poetry, drama and philosophy.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: HE218
Title: ANGLO-AMERICAN LITERATURE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A balanced survey of British and American literary history from the Renaissance thru the early twentieth century.. The course emphasizes the movements that have shaped our tradition: Renaissance humanism, empiricism and skepticism, Romanticism and transcendentalism, realism and naturalism, and modernism.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: HE222
Title: THE BIBLE AND LITERATURE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The Bible and its influence on European and American literature. Emphasis will be placed on modern biblical literary-critical methodology and on the symbolic richness of derivative literature from Dante to Nikos Kazantzakis.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: HE224
Title: LITERATURE AND SCIENCE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The interrelationships among science, technology, and literature. The course considers both the impact of science on literature and the implications of science as reflected in literary responses.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: HE250
Title: LITERATURE OF THE SEA
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Study of sea literature from the epic to the novel, with an emphasis on literary qualities, human relationships with the sea, and problems of command.
Offered: Spring, Summer
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: HE260
Title: LITERATURE OF WAR
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A multi-genre survey of war and its consequences as represented in classic and contemporary literature with an emphasis on such issues as individual responsibility, leadership, societal values, and military culture.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: HE301
Title: PATTERNS IN DRAMA
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A study of drama, emphasizing reading, viewing, and analyzing dramatic literature and performance.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE302
Title: FORMS OF POETRY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A study in the analysis of poetic form and expression.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE306
Title: TYPES OF FICTION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A study of the novel and short story with particular emphasis on the conventions, techniques, and innovations in the form.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE307
Title: TOPICS IN FILM AND LITERATURE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A study of American, European, and world film in conjunction with relevant literary works.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE313
Title: CHAUCER AND HIS AGE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The literary and philosophical traditions of Chaucer, the Gawain poet, and other contemporaries, including early and late medieval writers from England and the continent.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE314
Title: THE RENAISSANCE MIND
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Literature and thought of the period bracketed by the two great English epics, Spenser's Faerie Queene and Milton's Paradise Lost. The course includes a continental perspective, with readings from such authors as Machiavelli, Rabelais, Cervantes, Montaigne and Castiglione.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE315
Title: RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The literature of the period 1660-1780. Readings may include the plays, novels, satires, and poetry of such writers as Behn, Dryden, Swift, Defoe, Fielding, Pope, Steele, Sheridan, and Johnson.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE317
Title: THE ROMANTIC PERIOD
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Literature and culture of the Romantic period in Britain from the 1780s to the 1830s. Readings may include works by such writers as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Austen, the Shelleys, Byron, and Keats.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE318
Title: MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The literature of Great Britain and Ireland since 1900. Readings may include the novels of Conrad, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, and Lessing; the plays of Shaw, Synge, O'Casey, and Pinter; the poetry of Hardy, Yeats, Eliot, Auden, and Dylan Thomas.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE319
Title: VICTORIAN LITERATURE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: British literature from the 1830s to the end of the nineteenth century. Readings may include works from such authors as Dickens, the Brontes, George Eliot, Hardy, Tennyson, the Brownings, Arnold, Carlyle, and Darwin.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE320
Title: CONTEMPORARY BRITISH LIT.
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: British Literature from 1945 to the present day. Reading may include the novels of Orwell, Greene, Murdoch, Naipaul, Barnes, Ishigura, and Zadie Smith; the plays of Beckett, Pinter, Orton, Stoppard, Churchill, and Friel; and the poetry of Larkin, Heaney, Hughes, Gunn, and Motion.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE326
Title: AMERICAN LIT, 1607-1860
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A survey of American literature including the Native American tradition from European settlement to the Civil War, emphasizing the relationship between the emerging culture and literature. Readings may include works from such authors as Bradford, Bradstreet, Franklin, Wheatley, Cooper, Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, and Douglass.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE328
Title: AMERICAN LIT, 1860-1914
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A survey of American literature from the Reconstruction through the Gilded Age, emphasizing the rise of realism and naturalism. Readings may include works from such authors as Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Howells, Crane, Dreiser, Chesnutt, Chopin, James, and Wharton.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE329
Title: AMERICAN LIT, 1914-1945
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A survey of American literature between the wars. Readings may include works by such authors as Stein, Eliot, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Hughes, Hurston, Larsen, O'Neill, Steinbeck, West, and Wright.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE330
Title: AMERICAN LIT, 1945-PRESENT
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A survey of American literature and culture since World War II. Readings may include works by such authors as Ellison, Ginsberg, Lowell, Bishop, Baraka, Heller, Pynchon, Bellow, Plath, Sexton, Rich, Roth, Updike, DeLillo, Mamet, McCarthy, and Morrison.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE333
Title: SHAKESPEARE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A study of a representative sample of Shakespeare's tragedies, histories, and comedies. Readings may also include works by Shakespeare's contemporaries.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE340
Title: AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A survey of representative African-American literature from such figures as Wheatley, Toomer, Hughes, Hurston, Wright, Ellison, Baldwin, Baraka, Brooks, Hayden, Wilson, and Morrison.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE343
Title: CREATIVE WRITING
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An introduction to the writing of prose, poetry, and drama.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE344
Title: PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A study of advanced methods of presenting information in a wide variety of forms. Assignments may include preparing articles, reports, and military documents. Students may be asked to design and present a persuasive or analytical speech.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE353
Title: TOPICS IN CONTINENTAL LIT.
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course explores the variety of works produced from the Renaissance to the rise of the European Community, emphasizing the exchanges between social and literary history and the interactions between cultures.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE355
Title: TOPICS IN MULTI-ETHNIC LITERATURE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course considers literature that raises questions of race and ethnicity, postcolonial responses to hegemonic culture, canon formation, and shifting definitions of nation and subjectivity. Readings may include the works of Achebe, Cisneros, Coetzee, Gordimer, Marquez, Rushdie, and Tan among others.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE360
Title: SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An open-topics literature course. Specialized offerings vary from semester to semester.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HE111 and HE112.
Course: HE442
Title: LITERARY THEORY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A survey of key problems, figures, and texts in the history of literary and cultural thought. Required of all honors English majors.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: one 300-level English course.
Course: HE461
Title: STUDIES IN A LITERARY PERIOD
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: In-depth study of a limited period in literary history. For example: the Augustan period, the beginnings of Romanticism, the fin de siecle, and the 1960s in American literature.
Offered: Fall, Spring]
Requisites: Prereq: one 300-level English course and permission of the department chair.
Course: HE462
Title: STUDIES IN A LITERARY PROBLEM
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: In-depth study of a problem that cuts across traditional divisions of nationality, historical period, or genre. For example, myth and symbol in literature, literature and science, the concept of the hero.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: one 300-level English course and permission of the department chair.
Course: HE463
Title: STUDIES IN LITERARY FIGURES
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Extensive reading in the works, biography, and criticism of major figures in world literature. For example: Milton, Wordsworth, George Eliot, Dickens, Dostoevsky, O'Neill, Melville, Faulkner, Stevens, Morrison.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: one 300-level English course and permission of the department chair.
Course: HE467
Title: STUDIES IN A LITERARY GENRE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Study in a special genre. For example, the epic, the autobiographical novel, science fiction, imagist poetry.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: one 300-level English course and permission of the department chair.
Course: HE503
Title: SEMINAR IN ARTS & LITERATURE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An interdisciplinary honors seminar concerning a special topic in literature and the arts.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C Honors English majors or by permission of the department chair; Coreq: HE521.
Course: HE504
Title: SEMINAR IN AN ADVANCED TOPIC
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A concentrated honors seminar exploring individual literary works or issues.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C Honors English majors or by permission of the department chair; Coreq: HE522.
Course: HE521
Title: HONORS SUPPLEMENT I
Credits: 1-0-1
Description: Focused study of a topic generated in HE503.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HE503.
Course: HE522
Title: HONORS SUPPLEMENT II
Credits: 1-0-1
Description: Focused study of a topic generated in HE504.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HE504.
Course: HH104
Title: AMERICAN NAVAL HISTORY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course examines the antecedents, origins and development of the United States Navy and Marine Corps within the framework of America's growth as a continental and, eventually, global power, with particular emphasis on the development of naval and maritime strategy.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: HH215
Title: THE WEST IN THE PREMODERN WORLD
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course analyzes the historical evolution of ethical thought and its impact upon European society and culture from Antiquity to the Enlightenment in a comparative context of world religions and values. By studying the cultural expressions of Western ethical concerns, ideals and aspirations in light of other civilizations, this course broadens knowledge of the West's global context, cultivates the development of critical thinking about human beings and their societies, and deepens understanding of the competing values, institutions, and challenges of the modern West. The course fulfills the graduation requirement listed on matrices as HH2XY.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: HH215A
Title: ASIA IN THE PREMODERN WORLD
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course is designed to provide an alternative to HH215 The West in the Pre-Modern World. It introduces students to pre-modern Asian civilization, including China, India, Japan and Southeast Asia. This course traces the dynamic manifestations of cultural, political, military and intellectual patterns, and examines them through a global perspective. Students will study ancient Asian societies, cultures, and ethical thought in comparison with other world traditions including Classical, Judeo-Christian and Islamic cultures. The course fulfills the graduation requirement listed on matrices as HH2XY.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: HH215M
Title: THE MIDDLE EAST IN THE PREMODERN WORLD
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course is designed to provide an alternative to HH215 "The West in a Global Context". It introduces students to pre-modern Middle Eastern civilizations. This course traces the dynamic manifestations of cultural, political, military and intellectual patterns, and examines them through a global perspective. Topics include Middle Eastern ways of war. Moreover, students will encounter ancient Middle Eastern sages and their ethical ruminations not only in their own regard, but also in comparison with their counterparts in other world traditions including Classical, Asian, Judeo-Christian and Islamic cultures. The course fulfills the graduation requirement listed on matrices as HH2XY.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: HH216
Title: THE WEST IN THE MODERN WORLD
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Focusing chiefly on the period from the 18th century to the present, this course analyzes the most significant political, social, intellectual and economic trends that have shaped contemporary societies. HH216 examines the global impact of European and American cultures over the past three centuries and explores the most important reactions to modernity in both Western and non-Western societies. In doing so, the course situates the West in a global context and prepares students to think critically and comparatively about a changing world.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: HH262
Title: PERSPECTIVES ON HISTORY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A methodology course in which majors acquire the basic technical skills required for research and writing in subsequent courses in history and other humanities and social sciences disciplines. May be repeated only to remove a D or F.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 3/C HHS major; Coreq: HH215 or HH215A.
Course: HH311
Title: ATHENS: MILITARY DEMOCRACY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Examines the origins of Western democracy in 5th-century B.C. Athens. Focus is on the problems of democratic constitutions in settling foreign policy, surviving extended wars, administering foreign territories and dealing with questions of inequality at home.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH215 or HH215A.
Course: HH312
Title: IMPERIAL ROME
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Study of the most successful of Western states with emphasis on models for bureaucratization, military defense and the incorporation of various ethnic groups.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH215 or HH215A.
Course: HH315
Title: THE AGE OF CHIVALRY AND FAITH
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Surveys the history and culture of western Europe between about A.D. 1050 and about A.D. 1300, the period generally known as the High Middle Ages. The course traces the emergence of two self-defined medieval aristocracies: those who fight (the knighthood) and those who pray (the Christian clergy). Special attention is paid to developments in the socio-political systems of the age, kingship and lordship; to the culture of the medieval aristocracy, chivalry; to movements of religious enthusiasm; and to the evolution of the Catholic Church into a papal monarchy.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH215 or HH215A.
Course: HH316
Title: AGE OF RELIGIOUS WARS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Focuses on the emergence of modern civilization (1500-1763) from the discoveries and rediscoveries of the Renaissance, the sweeping changes brought by the Reformation and Counter-Reformation and the excitement of both scientific and political revolution.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH215 or HH215A.
Course: HH321
Title: REVOLUTIONARY RUSSIA--PETER THE GREAT TO LENIN
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A study of Russian history from the founding of Moscow to 1917, examining the domestic and external forces responsible for shaping the structure of Russian society and culture.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH322
Title: THE RISE AND FALL OF SOVIET COMMUNISM
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An examination of the Revolution of 1917 and the development of the Soviet Union, emphasizing the institutions and policies adopted to meet domestic and foreign problems.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH326
Title: IRELAND AND THE IRISH
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course presents the history of Ireland from the early Christian era to the present, with concentration on the past two centuries. The Great Famine, the independence movement, and the recent "Troubles" are examined in depth. Themes include Ireland's status as Britain's first colony, the role of literature and religion in forming Irish identity, and the "diaspora" of Irish people abroad.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH327
Title: GERMANY AND THE NAZI EXPERIENCE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Focuses on the antecedents of national socialism, including the Second Reich and World War I eras, the Nazi experience itself, and the legacy it bequeathed to today's German state.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH329
Title: MODERN FRANCE: NAPOLEON TO DEGAULLE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course examines France from the revolutionary upheaval of the late 18th century through its role in the Western world since World War II. Roughly the first half of the course will deal with the revolutions of 1789 and 1792 and their impact upon 19th-century France. The second half of the course will consider the experience of France in the 20th century and the changes forced upon the nation by two world wars fought on French soil.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH330
Title: IMPERIAL ENCOUNTERS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Great Britain from 1750 to the present. Begins with an analysis of Britain's political and social institutions. It then examines the changes brought about by industrialization at home, revolutions abroad and expansion of the empire. At its end, the course highlights the simultaneous eclipse of Britain as a world power and the increasing prosperity of the masses of the British people.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH331
Title: ART AND IDEAS IN MODERN EUROPE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Explores the transformation of culture in the modern world. Examines how artists and intellectuals reacted to the long-range impacts of the democratic and industrial revolutions. Emphasis is placed on development of the fine arts in relation to pivotal ideas from 1750 to present.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH337
Title: TOPICS IN EUROPEAN HISTORY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An open topics history course. Topics vary from semester to semester and cover a variety of specialized themes or eras in European history which are unique or too unusual to be integrated into the regular curriculum.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: HH345
Title: COLONIAL AMERICA
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Examines the ways in which three diverse cultures--Indian, European, and African--converged on the North American land mass before the American Revolution; topics include French, Spanish, and English exploration and settlement patterns, European-Indian encounters, gender, witchcraft, religion, slavery and race, the family, political ideas and institutions, and war and warmaking.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH346
Title: REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA AND THE EARLY REPUBLIC
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Covers the remarkable transformation in American society from 1760 to 1820 as thirteen separate and distinct colonies struggled ideologically, militarily, and politically to establish a governmental and social system that would suit the needs of a large, diverse, and rapidly expanding population. The background to the Revolution, the actual conduct of the war, and the construction of state and national governments are treated in detail.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH347
Title: CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An examination of the political, economic and social developments from the origins of the Civil War to 1896, including the wounding of the nation in a civil war and the subsequent reunification.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH349
Title: EMERGENCE OF MODERN AMERICA 1896-1945
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Examination of political, social, intellectual, diplomatic and economic aspects of American history from the Spanish-American War to the end of World War II. Special emphasis is placed on Progressivism, the emergence of the U.S. as a great power in World War I, the Depression and the New Deal, and World War II.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH350
Title: UNITED STATES SINCE WORLD WAR II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A detailed examination of American history since 1945, including the onset of the Cold War in the 1950s, the domestic and foreign policy issues of the 1960s, Vietnam, Watergate and the Reagan era.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH352
Title: FILM AND AMERICAN SOCIETY
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course explores the relations between motion pictures and the political/cultural life during the period 1930-1943. Films are studied as documents of an era and the extent to which they offer insights for historical understanding are considered.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH353
Title: AMERICAN SOCIAL HISTORY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An examination of American life and culture and the forces that have shaped them, emphasizing mass media, popular entertainment, religious movements and technological advances.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH354
Title: AMERICA IN WORLD AFFAIRS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Surveys U.S. foreign relations from the colonial era to recent times, focusing on America's transformation from a colony to a preeminent world power. Examines the causes and international consequences of this dramatic shift, with particular emphasis on the twentieth century--the era of America's greatest influence on world affairs.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH355
Title: ART AND IDEAS IN AMERICAN SOCIETY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Examines the growth and development of intellectual concepts and artistic creativity in America from colonial times to the present. Emphasizes both the peculiarities of American creative and intellectual accomplishments and the place of those achievements in the broader Western tradition.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH357
Title: TOPICS IN U.S. HISTORY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An open topics history course. Topics vary from semester to semester and cover a variety of specialized themes or eras in American history which are unique or too unusual for integration into the regular curriculum.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: HH360
Title: U.S. SECTIONAL HISTORY: THE SOUTH
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Surveys the growth and development of the American South with specific attention to the plantation economy and slavery, the Confederate experience, the rise of segregation and the Second Reconstruction.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH361
Title: HISTORY OF EAST ASIA
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An analysis of contemporary Asian problems which considers their cultural and institutional origins, their 19th-century development under the impact of western influence and their culmination in contemporary Asian nationalism.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH362
Title: HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE EAST
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A long-range historical approach to the Middle East's role in world affairs and the development of its cultural, political and military institutions. Emphasis is placed on strategic and diplomatic considerations.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH363
Title: MODERN LATIN AMERICA
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The evolution of Latin American societies from independence to the present will be studied. Analyses of social and political issues like slavery, race, immigration, popular religion, militarism, dictatorship, and revolution will be the focus of the course. Particular emphasis will be placed on Argentina, Mexico, Brazil, Peru, Chile, and Cuba.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH364
Title: HISTORY OF AFRICA
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A survey of social, cultural and political developments on the African continent from the era before European colonization to the present.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH365
Title: PRE-COLUMBIAN AND IBERIAN EMPIRES
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Pre-Columbian empires like Olmec, Maya, Aztec, and Inca are studied through examinations of their cosmologies, styles of warfare, expansion, imperial consolidation, and collapse. Spanish and Portuguese conquests in America will also be studied by focusing on military campaigns, imperial policies, race, ethnicity, slavery, and chruch-state relations through the Independence Era
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH215 or HH215A.
Course: HH367
Title: TOPICS IN REGIONAL HISTORY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An open topics history course. Topics vary from semester to semester and include a wide variety of specialized themes or eras in non-Western history which are too unique or unusual to be integrated into the regular curriculum. Examples of topics include the History of the Mongols, and the Balkans.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH371
Title: HISTORY OF FILM 1895-1968
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course examines the history of film from the first showing of motion pictures projected on a screen by the Lumieres in France in 1895. It will consider the origins and development of the film industry in the United States and abroad, the development of film techniques, the growth of the studio and star system, the introduction of sound, and efforts to deal with the rise of television. It will consider films both as an entertainment product for an international market and a source of national expression. Issues of censorship and control will, therefore, be a part of the course. (The arbitrary end date of 1968 is the introduction of the present film rating system in the United States.)
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: HH372
Title: THE GOLDEN AGE OF PIRACY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The Golden Age of Piracy explores the figure of the pirate from the sixteenth century to today. Students learn about the differences between the "mythical pirate" familiar to today's public and the "historical" pirate of the early-modern era, and determine how and why this "real" pirate has become distorted over time. Students also learn about contemporary piracy and the role of the US Navy in dealing with this growing problem. Students augment their knowledge of historiography and social scientific theory; work with early-modern primary source materials; engage in case-studies in asymmetric, irregular, and unconventional warfare; study the evolution of privateering and naval warfare; and refine their analytical skills.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: HH373
Title: HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course examines the history of Christianity from its origins to the present. It will pay particular attention to problems of authority and text; to the development of doctrine and practice; and to the relationship between religious and political institutions. Because Christianity grew into a global religion with a variety of forms in practice, belief, and organization, this course will also pay close attention to the inculturation of Christianity -- that is, its adaption to and accommodation of various cultures -- as it spread and developed.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HH215.
Course: HH376
Title: HISTORY OF ENGINEERING
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Examines the history of engineering since the medieval period. Topics will include the effects of national culture on engineering practice; the epistemology of engineering including case studies of engineering designs; the rise of science-influenced modern engineering; the creation of the engineering profession; the external factors that have shaped engineering and engineers; the changing nature of engineering education; engineering specialization and the practice of engineering; and the evolution of engineering culture.
Offered:
Requisites: Co-req: HH216
Course: HH377
Title: TOPICS IN THEMATIC HISTORY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An open topics history course. Topics vary from semester to semester and are often team-taught. A variety of historical themes dealing with long term developmental processes will be subjected to detailed analyses. Examples of topics include piracy, the development of national identities and the growth of capitalism.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH378
Title: HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY IN PEACE AND WAR
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Examines the social and historical implications of changing technology: how humans, their ideas, and the environment shaped and were in turn shaped by technological innovation. The course will devote approximately equal time to the study of civilian sector technologies and military technologies, beginning with the Middle Ages and concluding in the early 21st century. In addition, the course will review and develop student familiarity with competing theories of socio-technological change.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: None Coreq: HH215 or HH216
Course: HH379
Title: HISTORY OF IT REVOLUTIONS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Every age in human history has been an "information age" because in each historical period technologies were devised to gather, process, and disseminate information. This course identifies the most dominant information technologies from the printing press to the palm pilot and attempts to assess their broad historical implications. Special attention will be given to the military-IT nexus.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: HH104 and FP130.
Course: HH380
Title: HISTORY OF SCIENCE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: History of Science provides a survey of the history of science from the early Greek natural philosophers through the advent of 20th century "big science", with emphasis on early modern science, including the 17th century scientific revolution, 18th century Enlightenment science, and the post-Enlightenment rise of the modern physical and natural sciences.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH381
Title: WARFARE IN THE MIDDLE AGES, 500-1500
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Examines the evolution of warfare and military institutions in western Europe from the decline of the Western Roman Empire through the Middle Ages (ca. 1500). While tactics, strategy, and logistics are examined, the course seeks to place the history of medieval warfare into a political and societal context and show how political, social, technological, cultural, religious, and economic developments shaped and reshaped the way war was waged during the Middle Ages.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH215 or HH215A.
Course: HH382
Title: WARFARE IN THE AGE OF SAIL, 1500-1815
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course examines the theory, practice, and nature of warfare on sea and land, both in Europe and European colonies, from about 1500 through the era of Napoleon. Tactical, logistical, technological, and professional developments of Western navies and armies are studied in their political, economic, social, and cultural contexts. The course particularly explores the fundamental questions: What role did Western weapons and warfare, particularly warfare at sea, play in the development of Europe's various empires and Europe's eventual global dominance? Important topics include the rise of gunpowder weapons, the "Military Revolution," the rise of national armies and navies, maritime empires, and the lives of sailors and soldiers.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH383
Title: THE AGE OF TOTAL WAR, 1815-1945
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Surveys the dimensions of warfare and civil-military relations from the end of the Napoleonic era through World War II.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH384
Title: RECENT MILITARY AND NAVAL HISTORY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Surveys the dimensions of warfare and civil-military relations from the end of the World War II to the present.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH385
Title: THE U.S. MARINE CORPS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The historical development of the U.S. Marine Corps is examined by tracing the evolution of its roles and missions, organization, capabilities, and institutional culture. Emphasis is placed on how the Marine Corps has perceived its role in American Society, and how it has been perceived by American society.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: HH216.
Course: HH462
Title: SEMINAR IN ADVANCED STUDIES
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Offers midshipmen with a solid base in historical studies an opportunity to pursue the discipline at a level of greater sophistication. Taught in small, intensive seminars; individual sections will engage in a detailed examination of a selected historical topic. Each section will focus on a particular event or problem in history and on the interpretative debates surrounding it.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C HHS major or permission of department chair.
Course: HH480
Title: IT RESEARCH SEMINAR (HH)
Credits: 3-0-3
Description:
Offered:
Requisites:
Course: HH507
Title: HONORS HISTORIOGRAPHY
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Focusing on the interpretive debates surrounding a particular event or problem in history, students will learn to critically evaluate secondary texts, to discriminate between conflicting interpretations, and to make judgments regarding the merits of different analyses. Prereq: Admission to the honors program in history.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Admission to the Honors Program in history.
Course: HH508
Title: HONORS COLLOQUIUM
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Students will propose, conceptualize, and refine their 1/C independent research projects. In the process, they will test different historical interpretations, and evaluate different philosophies of history. They will submit a series of short essays culminating in a precis specifiying both the topic of their Honors research projects and the arguments these projects will advance.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: HH507.
Course: HH509
Title: HONOR SENIOR THESIS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: With the guidance of a faculty adviser, students prepare analytical research papers interpreting an historical topic of their choice. Each student makes an oral presentation of the finished paper before the faculty-student Honors Committee and external readers.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: HH507, HH508.
Course: HH512
Title: HONORS THESIS READINGS
Credits: 2-0-2
Description: After selecting a research topic and advisor, history honors students will engage in intensive reading of primary and secondary works related to the topic.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: HHSH major.
Course: IC210
Title: INTRO TO COMPUTING
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Introduction to algorithmic development, problem solving and software design. Principles and concepts to provide foundational knowledge and experience upon which later computing courses will build. This is the first course for computer science and information technology majors.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: IC211
Title: OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course builds on the procedural programming skills developed in the prerequisite course and introduces the student to object oriented programming and design principles using Java. Object oriented topics such as classes, inheritance, information hiding, polymorphism and dynamic binding are presented and used to create robust, reusable, and maintainable software. The fundaments of Java are presented along with exception handling, I/O, event driven programming, simple GUIs and generics.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: IC210 or SI204.
Course: IC220
Title: COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE & ORG
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course introduces students to performance metrics, instruction set architectures, assembly language, logic design, memory hierarchies, and pipelining.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: IC210 or SI204 or permission of department chair.
Course: IC221
Title: SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: The study of an application's interface with the operating system. The operating system is treated as an information resource, and as a facilitator for information flow between processes, including those executing on separate machines. Topics include: process management, multiprogramming, and the basic concepts necessary to understand the design and operation of computer communication networks.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: (IC210 or SI204 or permission of department chair); Coreq: IC220.
Course: IC312
Title: DATA STRUCTURES
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course examines abstract data types (ADT), data structures, data representation and information management including storage structures, allocation and collection. ADTs and data structures presented include lists, stacks, queues, trees, heaps, priority queues, maps, dictionaries and graphs. Sorting and searching techniques, hashing and graph algorithm analysis are also covered.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: (IC211 or permission of department chair); Coreq: SM242.
Course: IC322
Title: COMPUTER NETWORKS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: The course presents the fundamental theoretical concepts, characteristics and principles of computer communications and computer networks, and analyzes and assesses these foundational concepts with respect to network performance and network design.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: (IC221; Coreq: SM242) or permission of department chair.
Course: IC470
Title: SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: An introduction to the basic principles of software engineering.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: IC312.
Course: IC480
Title: RESEARCH SEMINAR/CAPSTONE
Credits: 1-4-3
Description: This is a capstone course that ties together concepts from the information technology and computer science curriculums to solve a practical problem. These team-oriented project solutions will include the requirements gathering, analysis, design and development of a computing system involving a large, multi-layer organization using appropriate information management and computing technologies.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: IT470 or Chair Permission.
Course: IT350
Title: WEB & INTERNET PROGRAMMING
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Web site design and management, clients and servers, client and server side scripting languages, web transmission protocols.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: IC210.
Course: IT360
Title: APPLIED DATABASE SYSTEMS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course introduces the principles underlying Database Management Systems (DBMS) with a special emphasis on database management system structure and function when integrated with web-based database applications.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: IC312 and IT350.
Course: IT430
Title: INFORMATION ASSURANCE AND NETWORK SECURITY
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course is an introduction to the theoretical and practical facets of Information Assurance (IA) to include: Department of Defense (DoD)/Department of the Navy (DoN) policies and directives, Trusted systems, Access mediation, Cryptography, Public Key Infrastructure (PKI), Information Warfare, Network security and Database security. Laboratory work will include student exercises demonstrating information assurance concepts culminating in a vulnerability analysis of given systems.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: IC322 or IT340.
Course: IT432
Title: ADV INFORMATION ASSURANCE AND NETWORK SECURITY
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course provides an introduction to topics in secure system design, including: cryptography, operating system security, and language based security. Where the IT430 course focuses primarily on securing an existing system, this course studies how to design a system to meet security goals. Students will design and implement components of a secure system.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: IT430 or permission of department chair.
Course: IT452
Title: ADV WEB & INTERNET SYSTEMS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: Web server design and configuration, search engine design and usage, web security and authentication, servlet implementations, web collaboration mechanisms, web services, and knowledge representation on the web.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: IT350.
Course: IT460
Title: HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: An introductory course emphasizing interactive software design, development and evaluation using a human-centered approach. Topics include aspects of human sensation, perception and cognitive psychology.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: IC312 or IT350.
Course: IT462
Title: ADV DATABASE SYSTEMS
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course will discuss advanced issues in database systems, including parallel, distributed and peer-to-peer databases, data warehousing and data mining, XML and service-oriented architectures. The course incorporates hands-on exercises using commercial database systems and products, as well as a web-database project.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: IT360 or SI440.
Course: IT470
Title: ENTERPRISE COMPUTING
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course develops architectures and concepts for the development of multi-tier (typically 3 tiered) distributed applications for an entire organization or enterprise. This includes a user interface called the client tier or tier 1, a server component which is controlled by the organization and provides for interaction with and data collection from the user (tier 2) and a database component that stores transactions and updates client profiles (tier 3). The course teaches advanced techniques for network programming as well as server management and programming.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: (IC322 or IT340) and (IT360 or IT420).
Course: NE203
Title: ETHICS AND MORAL REASONING FOR THE NAVAL LEADER
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course is structured around classical and contemporary writing in moral philosophy. Current and historical case studies are used to show how these fundamental ideas can be applied to the service of the professional military leader.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 3/C standing.
Course: NL110
Title: PREPARING TO LEAD
Credits: 2-0-2
Description: Midshipmen examine fundamental tenets of leadership in the context of the theories and principles of individual and group leadership during their first semester. Topics include self-knowledge, self-leadership, and team leadership as well as a Brigade Leader seminar on peer leadership. Midshipmen learn about themselves as leaders through inventories such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, StrengthsFinder inventory, and Values in Action survey which culminates in creating a personal life mission statement. The course instructors provide relevant personal and Fleet-based examples and emphasize interactive learning.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 4/C standing.
Course: NL200
Title: HUMAN BEHAVIOR
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An introduction to the science of psychology, this course covers the theories and principles of individual and group human behavior. Topics include learning, personality, social psychology, memory, human development, brain-functioning, health psychology and psychopathology. This course emphasizes research-based discoveries in the field of psychology. Students are prepared to critically evaluate behavioral science research and apply salient principles to leadership. Counts for Humanities-Social Science credit.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: none.
Course: NL211
Title: SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course focuses on human behavior in the social context. How individuals influence and are influenced by groups, as well as the field of group dynamics will be examined. Emphasis is placed on research-based findings in the areas of causal attribution, social perception, interpersonal attraction, attitudes and attitude change, group dynamics, prosocial behavior and aggression. Particular emphasis is given to application in the military setting. Counts for Humanities-Social Science credit.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: none.
Course: NL212
Title: PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGICAL SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: NL210 will introduce midshipmen to sociological social psychology, the study of interpersonal and group relationships. We will survey social psychological processes of cognition, emotion, identity, group processes, social structure, and symbolic interaction. Readings and lecture will address basic and applied research from both sociological and psychological social psychology to provide a broad and useful understanding of how people shape their world, relate to one another, and arrive at the ideas we use to understand each other. Particular emphasis is the application of principles of social psychology to military leadership challenges at the junior officer level. Midshipmen will only receive credit for either NL211 or 212.
Offered:
Requisites: 3/C standing.
Course: NL230
Title: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Sociology is the scientific study of society and the interactions among human beings. The purpose of this course is to provide a survey of the field of sociology and educate and inspire Midshipmen to examine contemporary situations that involve social interaction. Students will use sociological concepts, theories, and research to explain what is taking place, identify social threads and patterns across the situations, and determine the personal as well as the social significance of the analysis. Sociology demands that the student transcend the taken-for-granted, subjective world view and develop a sociological imagination by revealing the linkages and relationships among social facts and connect public issues to self awareness. Students will engage in the identification of common threads across social situations and determine the self and social significance of facts. The teaching and learning strategy involves reading, writing, discussions, presentations, and other active-learning, hands-on projects. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the basics of the field, to include micro, macro, and meso applications. Counts for Humanities-Social Science credit.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: NL110.
Course: NL306
Title: PERSONALITY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course offers an exploration of major influences on the development of personality from both theoretical and clinical perspectives. Theories covered include psychoanalytic, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic and biopsycosocial. This course addresses contemporary research and practice relative to assessment and understanding of personality traits, styles and disorders. Midshipmen will examine their own personality assets and liabilities and implications for leadership. Counts for upper level Humanities-Social Science credit.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: NL200.
Course: NL310
Title: LEADERSHIP: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Students examine the theory and research of the contingent and dynamic process of leadership. Students refine and further develop their understanding of personal strengths, values, and growth opportunities in the context of team, group, and organizational leadership, as well as through the creation of a leadership vision and professional development plan. The course combines literature from the fields of social psychology, organizational behavior, and group dynamics to help students understand the factors that influence leadership in a military context.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 2/C standing.
Course: NL311
Title: PSYCHOLOGY OF LEADERSHIP
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This is an intensive and experientially-focused course that emphasizes leader self-analysis and skill development. Areas covered include personnel management, team development and performance enhancement at both individual and group levels. Research findings from industrial/organizational consultation, learning, motivation, social behavior, group dynamics, personality, counseling, social perception and interpersonal influence will provide the undergirding for developing knowledge, attitudes and skills which contribute to effective leadership. Counts for upper level Humanities-Social Science credit.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 3/c standing or higher.
Course: NL312
Title: ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Explores the origins, symptoms, diagnosis and management of psychological disorders. Midshipmen gain an understanding of the root causes of psychological disturbance, including personality disorders. The cognitive, emotional, behavioral and cultural manifestations of these disorders are explored. Strategies for effective prevention and management of psychopathology in operational environments are addressed. Midshipmen also learn techniques for rapid assessment and triage of psychiatric crises. Counts for upper level Humanities-Social Science credit.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: NL313
Title: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF CRIME
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Why do individuals commit crime? Is the impetus genetic, environmental or a matter of free will? This course explores the biological and behavioral origins of criminal activity in society and examines how the justice system deals with such behavior. Special consideration is given to mentally ill defendants and use of the insanity defense. Students conduct case studies to diagnose the psychological and behavioral bases of criminal conduct in mock defendants, to recommend appropriate punishments and treatment, and to assess rehabilitative potential. Counts for upper level Humanities-Social Science credit.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C standing and NL200; Coreq: NL400.
Course: NL335
Title: ARMED FORCES AND SOCIETY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course examines the American military as a social institution using sociological concepts, theories, and methods. The internal organization and practices of the armed forces and the relationships between the military and other social institutions comprise the field of study. To understand the armed forces and their place in society it is necessary to consider forces, past, present and future, that influence and shape the military. Topics include: military culture and socialization; race and gender, recruiting and retention; changes in military organization; marriage and military families; warfare, technology, and the media. Counts for upper level Humanities-Social Science credit.
Offered:
Requisites: NL230 recommended.
Course: NL340
Title: CHANGE MANAGEMENT
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course will explore the theories, practices and tools/techniques for managing change in an organizational environment. Applicable theories and strategic approaches to solving organization problems such as human performance technology, organizational development, and "Lean Six Sigma" will be analyzed and compared. The overarching goal of this course is to develop the knowledge, abilities and skills that will assist future Navy and Marine Corps officers to successfully implement change and transformation in a variety of military organizational environments in the Fleet. Counts for upper level Humanities-Social Science credit.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: NL310 or permission of department chair.
Course: NL360
Title: CULTURE AND LEADERSHIP
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course will explore the theories and concepts of culture from multiple perspectives in order to provide future military officers with a broad understanding of the role of culture and human terrain in communities, societies and in the armed forces. Students will develop knowledge, abilities and skills that will assist future officers to successfully operate in the context of complex military environments around the globe. The course will follow a pedagogical approach of classroom theory integrated with the case study method of analysis and fieldwork conducted both on the Yard and away from USNA. Counts for upper level Humanities-Social Science credit.
Offered: Summer
Requisites: Prereq: 2/C standing or permission of department chair.
Course: NL400
Title: LAW FOR THE JUNIOR OFFICER
Credits: 2-0-2
Description: This course provides a broad survey of military law applicable to the junior officer. Students examine operational law concepts including the Law of Armed Conflict and the Law of the Sea. The course also explores a variety of military justice topics including constitutional issues such as search and seizure and self-incrimination, judicial and non-judicial forums and the administrative separation of enlisted service members from the Navy and Marine Corps.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C standing or permission of department chair.
Course: NL420
Title: COMMUNICATING AS A LEADER
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course examines how leaders use verbal, nonverbal, written, and visual communications to convey their vision and influence both their seniors and subordinates. The students will study interpersonal communication theory, analyze the communications techniques and styles of historical leaders, interact with guest speakers, assess technological aids to communication, and gain practical experience through assigned projects.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: NL310.
Course: NL425
Title: ENGINEERING LEADERSHIP
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The purpose of this course is to study the concepts and context of leadership in the technical and industrial environment. The course combines lecture, readings about technical leadership, and real-world case studies. Programs such as Apollo, the Joint Strike Fighter, the Vision for Space Exploration, and significant failures of major engineering programs will be analyzed from the technical leadership perspective. This course will illustrate how management of such complex technological programs requires the melding of technical expertise, organizational theory, and leadership. The subject matter has relevance for military leaders as they are increasingly being called upon to lead and manage in technical and industrial environments. Counts for upper level humanities-social science credit.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: NL310 or permission of department chair.
Course: NL430
Title: LEADERSHIP IN GROUPS AND ORGANIZATIONS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course investigates models of leadership drawn from military sociology and organizational behavior. It provides an overview of the critical scholarship on how large, complex, formal organizations like the Navy function and examines the leadership process within such organizations. Topics include group formation and performance, organizational culture and change from the perspective of junior leaders, and the challenges and imperatives of leadership under changing organizational circumstances. Counts for upper level Humanities-Social Science credit.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: NL435
Title: PEACE WAR AND SOCIAL CONFLICT
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This upper division course examines the social and military aspects of war and peace. Using sociological theories, concepts and methods the course considers, at the macro level of analysis, war and combat as social conflict (origins and causes, events and processes, effects and outcomes). At the meso-level of analysis, the course addresses the dynamic effects of social structure in the processes of war, combat and peace. While the Modern Western experience occupies a considerable section of the course, non-Western analyses of war and peace, as well as other forms of social conflict and resolution are introduced.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C standing.
Course: NL440
Title: EXPERIENTIAL LEADERSHIP
Credits: 0-6-3
Description: Experiential Leadership provides a supervised, self-selected opportunity to experience, reflect, conceptualize and deepen an understanding of leadership in an applied context. The course seeks to extend and complement the student's understanding of leadership by leveraging coursework completed at USNA (e.g., NL110, NE203, NL310) with a focused and professionally guided real-world experiential activity outside of the Naval Academy. Various military and civilian-based internships are available; however, the exact nature of the experiential activity will be developed and coordinated with a designated faculty mentor/sponsor. Midshipmen enrolled in the course undertake a commitment to research, scope, and gain faculty approval of a learning plan with specific objectives before the experiential experience begins; communicate regularly with their faculty mentor during the experience in order to focus reflection and understanding; continually seek out challenges and active participation opportunities during their experiential activity; record (log) their experiences as they pertain to their learning plan objectives and deliver a major paper and presentation following their return which meets the approved learning plan objectives.
Offered: Summer
Requisites: Prereq: NL310 and permission of department chair.
Course: NL450
Title: SOCIAL INEQUALITY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course investigates the social and physical constructs of race, gender, and ethnicity in the context of social inequality in America. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding how these constructs, both singly and in combination, affect American society and culture. The course examines how the social institutions of marriage and families, work and employment, education, media, and the state create and maintain inequalities. Marxian and conflict theories, Weber's multidimensional model, and the structural-functionalism of Durkheim and Talcott Parsons are covered in depth. Application of key concepts, principles, and theories to the American military and Naval Service is a cornerstone of this course, as is the understanding of cultural diversity. Upon completion of this course, the successful student will possess a stronger and broader understanding of how social stratification affects American society, and how this stratification contrasts with stratification systems in other societies.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: 2/C Standing.
Course: NN101
Title: INTRODUCTION TO NAVIGATION
Credits: 1-2-2
Description: A comprehensive introduction to basic navigation concepts, voyage planning, and contact tracking on maneuvering boards. The course objective is to develop skills in the practical uses of the navigation chart. Midshipmen are introduced to the navigation chart format and associated plotting tools and techniques and learn the concepts of chart coordinates, while measuring and calculating distances, times directions and speeds. Reinforces navigation rules and ship handling skills learned in NS101. Includes at-sea labs on 108 foot Yard Patrol (YP) craft and shore-based bridge simulator labs, providing midshipmen hands-on experience navigating in and out of harbors.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: NN200
Title: NAVIGATION AND PILOTING
Credits: 1-2-2
Description: This course builds upon the foundation of navigation and seamanship skills established in NS101 and NN101 and honed while at-sea during 3/C summer training. Reinforces piloting skills through practice on 108 foot Yard Patrol (YP) craft and in shore-based bridge simulator labs, providing midshipmen with hands-on experience navigating in and out of harbors, and introduces them to the principles of radar and electronic navigation, weather for the mariner, tides and currents, and voyage planning.
Offered: Fall, Summer
Requisites: Prereq: NN101.
Course: NN210
Title: BASIC NAVIGATION
Credits: 1-2-2
Description: A comprehensive introduction to basic navigation concepts, voyage planning, and contact tracking on maneuvering boards. The course objective is to develop skills in the practical uses of the navigation chart. Midshipmen are introduced to the navigation chart format and associated plotting tools and techniques and learn the concepts of chart coordinates while measuring and calculating distances, times directions and speeds. Reinforces navigation rules and ship handling skills learned in NS101. Includes at-sea labs on 108 foot Yard Patrol (YP) craft and shore-based bridge simulator labs, providing midshipmen hands-on experience navigating in and out of harbors.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015, Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: NS101 (3/C standing).
Course: NN310
Title: ADVANCED NAVIGATION
Credits: 1-2-2
Description: This course builds upon the foundation of navigation and seamanship skills established in NS101 and NN210. It reinforces piloting skills through practice on 108 foot Yard Patrol (YP) craft and in shore-based bridge simulator labs, providing midshipmen with hands-on experience navigating in and out of harbors. It introduces Midshipmen to the principles of radar and electronic navigation, and voyage planning.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015, Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: NN210 (2/C standing).
Course: NP230
Title: INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An introduction to philosophy through close study of one or more classic works of philosophy, with an emphasis on examining philosophical conceptions of leadership. In recent semesters, these have included Plato's Republic (and other dialogues of Plato), Descartes' Meditations on First Philosophy, Kant's Prolegomena to any Future Metaphysics and historical essays (including "Perpetual Peace"), Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil, and selections of essays on political and military leadership by Plutarch, Machiavelli, Locke, Hegel, Kierkegaard, and other modern and contemporary philosophers. The emphasis of the course is on careful reading and analysis of the text, and on seminar discussion among the class participants (what Plato described as "dialectic" and reckoned in the Republic to be among the chief prerequisites for sound military and political leadership), together with several substantial writing assignments, and written mid-term and final examinations. Counts for Humanities-Social Science credit.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: None; Coreq: NE203.
Course: NP232
Title: MILITARY ETHICS: THE CODE OF THE WARRIOR
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Why do warriors fight? How do they fight? What should bring a warrior honor? What should bring them shame? What is really worth dying for? There have been special warrior cultures in countless societies across the globe, through every era in history. Were these warriors just killers, or did they have their own unique codes of behavior? This course explores several warrior traditions: the Ancient Greeks, the Vikings, the Romans, the Celts, Knights and Chivalry, African Tribesmen, Native American Warriors, Chinese Warrior Monks, Japanese Samurai, and 20th Century warriors, and applies the lessons of their experience and warrior philosophy to the task of creating the ideal code for warriors of the new millennium. Counts for Humanities-Social Science credit.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: NP240
Title: PHILOSOPHY AT THE MOVIES
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course will examine perennial problems or themes in the history of philosophy through the medium of films. Topics we will explore: skepticism, personal identity, philosophy of mind, relativism, utilitarian and deontological ethics, the meaning of life, and the problem of evil.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: NE203 or 2/C standing.
Course: NP250
Title: LOGIC AND CRITICAL THINKING
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: First-rate officers need to be first-rate critical thinkers. Indeed, critical thinking is near the top of any list of skills needed for personal success, independence, self-understanding, and fulfillment in life. The primary objective of this course is to impart a functional ability to reason well--to improve your analytical skills and instincts (and thereby also your reading and writing skills), and to enhance your credibility as you demonstrate to others that you understand how reasoning works and that you can think rigorously, clearly, transparently, and self-critically. The course will develop your abilities to comprehend, analyze, and evaluate others' arguments, and to create strong arguments of your own.
Offered:
Requisites: Prereq: 3/C or higher
Course: NP335
Title: COMPARATIVE STUDY OF RELIGION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course is designed as an introduction to the study of religion through the examination and comparison of concepts and themes central to human cultures. Examples are drawn primarily from the ancient Near East (including ancient Israel and Iran), China, Japan, classical Greece and Rome, Southeast Asia, the Americas, Eurasia, Judaism, Christianity, Zoroastrianism, Buddhism, Manichaeism, Islam, Hinduism, and contemporary non-literate cultures. Students are challenged to think in broad comparative terms, bringing together both details and generic categories.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: NP336
Title: PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course provides a focused introduction to philosophical questions that arise about religion and in the pursuit of religious ideals. Whether you are a person of strong faith from any religious tradition or an agnostic or an atheist, you will enjoy investigating and debating questions and topics such as these: Arguments for the Existence of God, Do Miracles Occur?, What is the Source of Evil?, What Happens When We Die?, Faith and Reason, Faith and scientific Knowledge, Religious Pluralism, and the Relationship Between Religion and Ethics. One way or another, these issues affect us all. Counts for Humanities-Social Science credit.
Offered: Fall, Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C or 2/C or permission of department chair.
Course: NP340
Title: PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Everyone learns science from textbooks and tried-and-true lab experiments, but do you know how scientists really work? How they decide to count only certain things as "facts," and to regard only certain theories as "knowledge"? How they struggle to eliminate the subjective factor that is present in all human inquiry, in order to discover objective truths? In this course, you will examine these intriguing issues by reading some classic works of philosophers, historians, and sociologists of science; by comparing the processes of knowledge-generation in science with the analogous processes in other fields and in everyday life; and by studying specific current instances where the scientific information available to the public seems inadequate for enlightened decision-making. Leave behind the popular myths and stereotypes about scientists, and find out how their world really works! (*required for all General Science majors) Counts for Humanities-Social Science credit.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C or 2/C or permission of department chair.
Course: NP410
Title: PHILOSOPHY OF WAR
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course will begin with a careful philosophical analysis of the concept of war and then proceed to a critical investigation of its moral permissibility. In so doing, we will consider such questions as: what distinguishes war from other forms of violence and coercion; whether offensive or defensive wars are ever justified; whether the use of military force for humanitarian ends is legitimate; what weapons, tactics and strategies may be employed in fighting a war, and against whom may such weapons, tactics and strategies be used?
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: NE203.
Course: NP420
Title: PHIL FOUNDATIONS OF LIBERTY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Most of us believe that liberty is an important value. Indeed, many of us believe that it is the most important moral value. But we often do so without stopping to consider what liberty is and why we think it is so important. For example, is liberty the absence of something (interference) or the presence of something (control); is liberty something one necessarily wants more of or are there times when one might want less; can constraints on one's liberty be liberating or are they always limiting; should one be permitted to give up one's liberty or should one be forced to be free; does a commitment to individual liberty require a commitment to free markets or is a commitment to individual liberty compatible with other types of economic arrangements? Furthermore, what is the relationship between liberty and other things we value such as justice, equality, security, community, happiness and responsibility? Through the reading of classical and contemporary texts, this course will examine these and other related questions, not with the intent of achieving a final resolution, but rather with the intent of providing the student with a framework to thoughtfully consider and evaluate the relevant philosophical and moral issues. Emphasis throughout will be on class participation together with weekly writing assignments. Both a written mid-term and final examination will be given.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: NE203.
Course: NP430
Title: ETHICS AND IRREGULAR WARFARE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: The War on Terror has seen American personnel resorting to the nightmare palette of harsh responses to terrorism and insurgency: assassination, torture, secret detention, military tribunal. This course will seek answers to the moral questions occasioned by the last decade of war. How can a state justly fight nonstate actors employing terrorism and suicide attacks? Can there be a just insurgency? How can terrorism suspects be interrogated in a morally upright manner? Does torture work? Should irregular fighters like al-Qaeda operators get POW status or should they be treated as common criminals? Should they get civilian trials? Should they be Mirandized? Curriculum will include philosophical, historical, legal, and journalistic texts.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: NE203
Course: NS101
Title: FUNDAMENTALS OF SEAMANSHIP
Credits: 1-2-2
Description: This course provides the basic maritime background in general ship characteristics, ship handling, and international and inland navigational rules (i.e. Rules of the Road). Includes at-sea labs on 108 foot Yard Patrol (YP) Craft and shore-based bridge simulator labs, providing midshipmen with hands-on experience navigating in and out of harbors where midshipmen gain ship maneuvering experience and practical application of the navigation rules.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015, Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None (4/C standing).
Course: NS300
Title: NAVAL WARFARE
Credits: 0-2-1
Description: This course examines naval doctrine and the tactical decision making factors that influence warfare planning and operations. The course articulates operational concepts that govern the employment of naval forces by providing midshipmen with examples of tactics, techniques, and procedures. Surface, undersea, air, strike, and expeditionary warfare areas are examined throughout the course. Comprehensive war-gaming exercises provide midshipmen with the opportunity to plan and develop an operation in a tactical situation. Practical application of course material is exercised through the development of the commander's intent, mission analysis, and tactical decision making while planning potential courses of action for an in-depth joint operation.
Offered: Fall, Summer
Requisites: Prereq: 2/C standing or Physics major or Department Chair approval.
Course: NS421
Title: JO PRACTICUM (SURFACE WARFARE)
Credits: 0-2-1
Description: A course to provide information about the duties and responsibilities required of a junior officer in the surface warfare community. Instruction includes operational procedures and practical applications of leadership and management principles tailored to the surface force, as well as an introduction to the Division Officer at Sea qualification process. Labs include training in ship-handling and bridge watch-standing skills through the use of YPs and simulation software. Those entering surface warfare, surface warfare (nuclear), and any other surface warfare option upon graduation should take this course.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C standing.
Course: NS422
Title: JO PRACTICUM (SUBMARINE WARFARE)
Credits: 0-2-1
Description: A course to provide information about the duties and responsibilities required of a junior officer in the submarine warfare community. Instruction includes operational procedures and practical applications of leadership and management principles tailored to the submarine force. Topics include surfaced and submerged navigation, mission planning, and quality assurance. Those entering the submarine community upon graduation should take this course.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C standing.
Course: NS423
Title: JO PRACTICUM (NAVAL AVIATION)
Credits: 0-2-1
Description: A course to provide information about the duties and responsibilities required of a junior officer in the aviation community. Instruction includes operational procedures and practical applications of leadership and management principles tailored to the aviation community, descriptions of the aviation training pipeline, aviation preflight indoctrination, various naval aviation communities, squadron organization, division officer responsibilities, Naval Aviation Safety and Operating Procedures (NATOPS), and aircrew coordination training. Those entering Navy Pilot and Naval Flight Officer communities upon graduation should take this course.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C standing.
Course: NS424
Title: JO PRACTICUM (MARINE CORPS)
Credits: 0-2-1
Description: A course to provide information about the duties and responsibilities required of a junior officer in the Marine Corps. Instruction includes operational procedures and practical applications of leadership and management principles tailored to the Marine Corps. Instruction includes: tactics, techniques, and procedures of the Marine Corps; organizational structure and operational procedures; and practical applications of leadership principles tailored to the Marine Corps' Operating Forces. Particular emphasis is placed on combat and tactical decision-making to develop and enhance the midshipman's critical thinking ability, analytical skills, and bias for action. Additionally, all concepts are reinforced through demanding physical fitness routines designed to challenge the student physically as well as mentally. Those entering the United States Marine Corps, Marine Corps Pilot, Marine Corps Naval Flight Officer, and Navy Civil Engineering Corps communities upon graduation should take this course.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C standing.
Course: NS425
Title: JO PRACTICUM (SPECIAL WARFARE)
Credits: 0-2-1
Description: A course to provide information about the duties, responsibilities, and challenges facing a junior officer in the Naval Special Warfare (NAVSPECWAR) community. Instruction includes operational procedures and practical applications of leadership and management principles tailored to NAVSPECWAR. This course introduces students to the existing NAVSPECWAR command structure, capabilities and future trends, the intricacies of small unit mission planning, land navigation, SEAL swimming skills, weapons-handling, administrative responsibilities, reviews of pertinent historic case studies, and analyses of decision making. Labs include instruction in small unit tactics, small boat handling skills, various outdoor training activities, and guest lecturers to discuss leadership as a junior officer. Those entering the Naval Special Warfare community upon graduation should take this course.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C standing.
Course: NS426
Title: JO PRACTICUM (EOD)
Credits: 0-2-1
Description: A course to provide information about the duties and responsibilities required of a junior officer in the Special Operations/EOD community. Instruction includes operational procedures and practical applications of leadership and management principles tailored to the Special Operations community. Practical exercises include dive locker training, underwater training and small boat handling skills in preparation for Dive School. Those entering the Special Operations/Explosive Ordnance Community should take this course.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C standing.
Course: NS427
Title: JO PRACTICUM (RESTRICTED LINE & STAFF CORPS)
Credits: 0-2-1
Description: A course to provide information about the duties and responsibilities required of a junior officer in restricted line and staff corps communities. Instruction includes operational procedures and practical applications of leadership and management principles tailored to the specific communities. Course material is selected to provide advanced study in the fundamentals of the appropriate service communities. Those entering Medical Corps, Supply Corps, and other Staff Corps and Restricted Line communities should take this course.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C standing.
Course: NS431
Title: JO PRACTICUM (SURFACE)
Credits: 1-2-2
Description: This course provides information about the duties and responsibilities required of a junior officer in the surface warfare community. Instruction includes operational procedures and practical applications of leadership and management principles tailored to the surface force. Labs include training in ship-handling and bridge watch-standing skills through the use of YPs and simulators. Additionally, this course examines naval doctrine, and the operational and tactical employment of naval forces. Those entering Surface Warfare or Supply Corps upon graduation are required to take this course.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Surface Warfare selectee (1/C standing).
Course: NS432
Title: JO PRACTICUM (SUBMARINES)
Credits: 1-2-2
Description: This course provides information about the duties and responsibilities required of a junior officer in the submarine warfare community. Instruction includes operational procedures and practical applications of leadership and management principles tailored to the submarine force. Topics include surfaced and submerged navigation, mission planning, and quality assurance. Additionally, this course examines naval doctrine, and the operational and tactical employment of naval forces. Those entering the Submarine Warfare community upon graduation are required take this course.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Submarine Warfare selectee (1/C standing).
Course: NS433
Title: JO PRACTICUM (AVIATION)
Credits: 1-2-2
Description: This course provides information about the duties and responsibilities required of a junior officer in the aviation community. Instruction includes operational procedures and practical applications of leadership and management principles tailored to the aviation community. Topics include aviation training pipeline, the various naval aviation communities, squadron organization, division officer responsibilities and Naval Aviation Safety and Operating Procedures training. Additionally, this course examines naval doctrine, and the operational and tactical employment of naval forces. Those entering Navy Pilot, Naval Flight Officer, Intelligence, Cryptology, and Information Warfare communities upon graduation are required to take this course.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Aviation Warfare selectee (1/C standing).
Course: NS434
Title: JO PRACTICUM (USMC)
Credits: 1-2-2
Description: This course provides information about the duties and responsibilities required of a junior officer in the Marine Corps. Instruction includes operational procedures and practical applications of leadership and management principles tailored to the Marine Corps. Topics include tactics, techniques, procedures, organizational structure and practical applications of leadership. Particular emphasis is placed on combat and tactical decision-making to develop and enhance analytical skills and bias for action. Additionally, this course examines naval doctrine, and the operational and tactical employment of naval forces. Those entering the Marine Corps, and Civil Engineering Corps communities upon graduation are required to take this course.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: US Marine Corps selectee (1/C standing).
Course: NS435
Title: JO PRACTICUM (SPECWAR)
Credits: 1-2-2
Description: This course provides information about the duties, responsibilities, and challenges facing a junior officer in the Naval Special Warfare (NAVSPECWAR) community. Instruction includes operational procedures and practical applications of leadership and management principles tailored to NAVSPECWAR. Topics include command structure, capabilities, future trends, small unit mission planning, land navigation, weapons-handling and decision making. Labs include instruction in small unit tactics and small boat handling skills. Additionally, this course examines naval doctrine, and the operational and tactical employment of naval forces. Those entering the Naval Special Warfare community upon graduation are required to take this course.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Special Warfare selectee (1/C standing).
Course: NS436
Title: JO PRACTICUM (EOD)
Credits: 1-2-2
Description: This course provides information about the duties and responsibilities required of a junior officer in the Special Operations/EOD community. Instruction includes operational procedures and practical applications of leadership and management principles tailored to the Special Operations community. Labs include dive locker training, underwater training and small boat handling skills in preparation for Dive School. Additionally, this course examines naval doctrine, and the operational and tactical employment of naval forces. Those entering the Special Operations/Explosive Ordnance community upon graduation are required to take this course.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Special Operations/EOD selectee (1/C standing).
Course: NS437
Title: JO PRACTICUM (MEDICAL CORPS)
Credits: 1-2-2
Description: This course provides information about the duties and responsibilities required of a junior officer in the Medical Corps. Instruction includes operational procedures and practical applications of leadership and management principles tailored to Medical community. Course material is selected to provide study in the fundamentals of the Medical community. Additionally, this course examines naval doctrine, and the operational and tactical employment of naval forces. Those entering Medical Corps upon graduation are required to take this course.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: Medical Corps selectee (1/C standing).
Course: SA302
Title: ANALYSIS OF NAVAL TACTICS
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: An introduction to the techniques of modeling and quantitative analysis applied to specific naval operational problems, including search and patrol, screening, anti-air warfare, mining, equipment reliability and decision rules. Does not count as a major elective for Mathematics majors.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: SM219, SM239 or SM230.
Course: SA305
Title: LINEAR PROGRAMMING
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: An introduction to linear programming. Topics include: extensive linear programming modeling techniques, the Simplex method, sensitivity analysis, and basic linear programming theory. Midshipmen cannot receive credit for both SA305 and SA401.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: SM261 or permission of department chair.
Course: SA367
Title: INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL MODELING
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Realistic problems, often of military interest, are formulated mathematically and solved using techniques from probability, statistics, calculus and differential equations. The analysis is carried out by students working in small teams and individually. Solutions are presented in oral nontechnical briefings and in written technical reports.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: SM219, SM239 or SM230.
Course: SA402
Title: DYNAMIC & STOCHASTIC MODELS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Investigation of quantitative analysis of decision options, including dynamic programming, decision trees, Markov chains and queuing theory. Applications to typical operations are stressed.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: (SM239 or SM230) and SM261.
Course: SA403
Title: GRAPH AND NETWORK ALGORITHMS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course introduces graph algorithms for problems in network and combinatorial optimization. Topics include: minimum spanning trees, matchings, shortest paths, maximum flows and minimum cost flows. Students will also be expected to program algorithms on a computer.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: SM233 or permission of department chair.
Course: SA405
Title: ADVANCED MATH PROGRAMMING
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course covers a range of advanced topics in mathematical programming. Topics include integer programming modeling, branch-and-bound methods, integer programming theory and nonlinear optimization theory and algorithms. Students will also learn to use a set-based modeling language for an advanced integer programming solver. Topics will vary with instructor.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: SA305 or permission of department chair.
Course: SA410
Title: APPLICATIONS OF SEARCH AND DETECTION THEORY
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Considerations in picking a measure of effectiveness (MOE) for use in analyzing decision options and decision criterion are studied. The focus of the course is the analysis of search and detection operations, particularly as they arise in anti-submarine operations, using probability models. Barrier detection, area search and parallel sweep operations models are developed. Additional topics in mine warfare, target coverage models, anti-air warfare, and target motion analysis may be picked for study by the instructor. Credit cannot be given for both SA302 and SA410.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: SM239 or SM230.
Course: SA412
Title: PROJECTS IN OPERATIONS ANALYSIS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Operations research techniques are applied using student projects, case studies and visiting lecturers. Topics include current military and industrial problems.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: permission of department Chair.
Course: SA421
Title: SIMULATION MODELING
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Discrete simulation of systems using a simulation language. Includes random variate generation, validation and verification of simulations, input and output data analysis. Semester projects are done as part of an analysis team.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: SM233. Coreq: SM339.
Course: SA430
Title: LOGISTICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Investigation of techniques of operations analysis applicable to the solution of problems in reliability, maintainability, availability and inventory.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: SM239 or SM230.
Course: SA442
Title: APPLIED STATISTICS II
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: A continuation of SM339 that includes examination, evaluation and application of advanced statistical methods. Techniques studied include sampling, nonparametric analysis, simple and multiple regression, correlation, analysis of variance and decision theory.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: SM339.
Course: SA475
Title: OPERATIONS RESEARCH CAPSTONE
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: This course is a capstone course for the Operations Research major. Students will read and make presentations on topics determined by the instructor. Each student will complete a project on a topic to be agreed upon by the instructor and student. Students will present their results in writing and orally.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C SMO Major or permission of department chair.
Course: SA475E
Title: RESEARCH SEMINAR IN QUANTITATIVE ECONOMICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Directed research on a specific topic. Capstone course for Quantitative Economics majors. Emphasis on empirical work using computers.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: 1/C SQE major.
Course: SB201
Title: BIOLOGY FOR THE NAVAL OFFICER
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Students will learn basic biology in the context of its applications to everyday life and their future duties in the Naval Service. Topics will include biomechanics, human performance, diet and nutrition, hormones, genetics and the human genome, genetic engineering, DNA "fingerprinting", disease, resistance and immunity. Note: Students cannot get credit for both SB201 and SB211 or SB201 and SB251.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: SB211
Title: BIOLOGY FOR NAVAL OFCR W LAB
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Students will learn basic biology in the context of its applications to everyday life and their future duties in the Naval Service. Topics will include biomechanics, human performance, diet and nutrition, hormones, genetics and the human genome, genetic engineering, DNA "fingerprinting", disease, resistance and immunity. Laboratories are designed to reinforce and expand upon topics from lecture. Note: Students cannot get credit for both SB201 and SB211 or SB211 and SB251.
Offered: Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: SB251
Title: GENERAL BIOLOGY I
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Fundamental principles of the science of biology are introduced. Topics include metabolism, cell structure and function, classical and molecular genetics, evolution, and ecology. The perspective of the course is from life as a whole, with a focus on the position of humans in the overall scheme.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015, Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: SB252
Title: GENERAL BIOLOGY II
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This course provides students with a solid foundation in human physiology. Lectures focus on the mechanisms of body function along with complementary concepts in biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and developmental biology. Laboratory sessions cover the same topics as well as anatomy and histology.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015, Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: SB251.
Course: SB338
Title: MOLECULAR & GENERAL GENETICS
Credits: 3-0-3
Description: Students in this course will study the inheritance of traits, starting with basic (Mendelian) genetics and ending with modern molecular biology. The course will examine incomplete dominance, epistasis, pleiotropy, transformation, cloning, genetic engineering, imprinting, and experimental techniques. Colisted as SC338.
Offered: Spring
Requisites: Prereq: SB251 or SC335.
Course: SB431
Title: MICROBIAL CHEMISTRY
Credits: 2-2-3
Description: This course will explore the interesting and important interactions that occur between microbes and their surroundings, including human hosts and extreme environments. Species of these "simple" organisms have evolved diverse mechanisms to combat assault by antibiotics, heavy metals, pollutants and extreme irradiation. The lab component of the class will include identifying, cultivating and testing organisms with survival mechanisms of interest. Colisted as SC431.
Offered: Fall
Requisites: Prereq: SB251 and SC335.
Course: SB453
Title: NEUROSCIENCE AND DEVELOPMENT
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: Neuroscience and Developmental Biology is an advanced treatment of neuroscience and developmental biology that builds on both the molecular and cellular background provided in SB251 and the basic principles underlying nervous system function introduced in SB252 and applies them to topics including both somatic and special sensory modalities, initiation, execution and coordination of motor programs and the neuroanatomical organization of the pathways that control these functions. Additional special topics will be introduced on a rotating basis. The course will also use the examples set by studies performed in model organisms to elucidate the mechanisms by which normal development proceeds in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on neural development.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: SB252.
Course: SC111
Title: FOUNDATIONS OF CHEMISTRY I
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: The first in a two-semester sequence presenting the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry. Major topics include chemical stoichiometry, periodic trends, atomic structure, chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, electrochemistry and kinetics. The lecture material is complemented with experiments designed to develop the student's laboratory skills. Naval applications of chemistry are introduced throughout the courses to provide an awareness of chemistry in normal Navy operations.
Offered: Fall 2014-2015, Spring 2014-2015
Requisites: Prereq: None.
Course: SC112
Title: FOUNDATIONS OF CHEM II
Credits: 3-2-4
Description: This is the second in the two-course foundations of chemistry sequence. See SC111 for a general course description. I