USMA Course Offerings Fall 2012-2013  

Course Title Crdts Scope Department
CE350 INFRASTRUCTURE ENGINEERING 3 This course identifies, analyzes, and assesses built infrastructure which is the foundation for modern society. The complex and interconnected nature of infrastructures is investigated and demands on critical components are calculated. Students explore the non-technical factors necessary for the functioning of infrastructure including supplies, trained personnel, and cross-sector dependencies. The course provides a basis for understanding the complexity and cost of maintaining, rebuilding and developing infrastructure. Major blocks of instruction include water and wastewater, power, transportation, solid waste, communications systems, and public administration. Several in-class scenarios are provided to synthesize the connectivity between the major items of infrastructure. Finally, as infrastructure is one of the six variables in the joint operating environment, the knowledge gained is employed to analyze infrastructure in the context of combat operations. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
CE390 CIVIL ENGINEERING SITE DESIGN 3.5 This course provides cadets the necessary background to select and develop sites for civil engineering structures as well as review the work of others. Proper site selection and engineering have a significant impact on the economics of a project and long-term utility of the constructed facility. Specifically, the course covers the skills of determining site layout and access, establishing site contour and drainage, installation of utilities, elementary surveying, creation of drawings using a computer aided drafting package, and the development of environmental impact statements. In the theater of operations, this background is critical to the success of missions related to construction of roads, runways, base-camps and other engineered military works. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
CE403 STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS 3 This course addresses the analysis and design of basic structural forms such as beams, trusses, and frames, which are found in bridges and buildings. Classical deflection techniques such as direct integration and virtual work; and indeterminate analysis techniques such as the force method and displacement methods (slope deflection, direct stiffness and moment distribution) are used to determine forces and deflections in elastic structures. Structural analysis computer programs are introduced and directly applied in the solution of graded analysis and design problems. Approximate analysis techniques are used to check the general accuracy of computer-based results. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
CE404 DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES 3 This course teaches the engineering thought process through the design of steel structures. The course synthesizes the fundamentals of statics, mechanics of materials, and structural analysis and applies them to the design of structural members, with emphasis on satisfying real-world needs. Topics include an introduction to the design of structural systems, design of steel tension and compression members, design of beams and beam-columns, and an introduction to connection design. All design is performed in accordance with codes and specifications used in current engineering practice. A comprehensive design problem requires development of a design methodology, consideration of alternative solutions, and design of an optimal steel structure to meet stated functional requirements. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
CE450 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT 3 This course focuses on the implementation portion of the design process. The management of construction is covered to include scope of work, rough order-of-magnitude estimating, scheduling, planning, progress reporting, resource constraining, and quality control. The roles of the contractor, owner, and designer are explained. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
CE472 ADV SOIL MECHNCS/FNDTN ENGRNG 3 Students will extend what they learned in Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering and design advanced foundations in this course. Topics covered are: slope stability, field testing, field instrumentation, designing braced excavations, designing piles and drilled shafts, designing flexible walls, designing earth retaining structures, and designing earth structures using geosynthetics. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
CE483 DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE 3.5 The course introduces the materials and mechanical properties of concrete, and the design of reinforced concrete structures. Mix design and strength testing labs develop the concept of proportioning constituents for quality concrete and provide a background in techniques of material testing, quality control, and sound construction practices. The study of reinforced concrete includes analysis and design of simple structures, resulting in an appreciation for the strength and serviceability of these structures. Current codes and standards are used to guide the practical design of beams, slabs, columns, and footings. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
CE489 ADV IND STUDY CIVIL ENGRING 3 The cadet, on an individual or small group basis, pursues advanced study of a research or design topic in civil engineering. The scope of the course is tailored to the needs of the project and desires of the cadet, in consultation with the Faculty Advisor. The cadet is required to define and analyze the problem, study the fundamentals involved, organize an approach, determine a procedure, perform research and/or achieve a solution, submit a written report, and give a formal briefing. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
CE489A ADV IND STUDY CIVIL ENGRING 3 The cadet, on an individual or small group basis, pursues advanced study of a research or design topic in civil engineering. The scope of the course is tailored to the needs of the project and desires of the cadet, in consultation with the Faculty Advisor. The cadet is required to define and analyze the problem, study the fundamentals involved, organize an approach, determine a procedure, perform research and/or achieve a solution, submit a written report, and give a formal briefing. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
CE490 TOPICS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 3 This course provides in-depth study of a special topic in engineering mechanics or in structural, geotechnical, environmental, water resources, construction, or transportation engineering not offered elsewhere in the USMA curriculum. The course is intended to broaden the cadet's exposure to the civil engineering discipline. Course content will be based on the special expertise of the visiting professor or a senior civil engineering faculty member. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
CE491 ADV STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS 3 This course builds upon the material covered in CE403/453 to develop a better understanding of structural behavior. Matrix analysis methods, including an introduction to finite elements, are developed as the basis for modern, computer-based structural analysis. These and other advanced analytical techniques are used to analyze and design trusses, beams, and frames. Coursework involves extensive use of the computer as an analytical tool. Students use state-of-the-art structural engineering analysis and design software and Computer Aided Drafting software. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
CH101 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I 3.5 This course provides a solid background in chemistry principles and applications. It includes a study of the nature of matter, its atomic and molecular structure, and the associated energies involved. Fundamental concepts, principles, theories, and laws of chemistry are stressed. Stoichiometry, states of matter, solutions, kinetics, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, electro-, organic, and nuclear chemistry are stressed. The course also provides the student with a strong foundation in materials chemistry, the chemistry of life, environmental chemistry, and military chemistry. A laboratory program is integrated within the course and is designed to develop an appreciation of classical and modern investigative techniques and to illustrate fundamental concepts. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH151 ADV GENERAL CHEMISTRY I 3.5 An advanced coverage of the concepts and principles covered in CH101-102 including a more in-depth laboratory program with emphasis on instrumental analysis. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH290 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH 1 Introduces the methods of research in chemistry, chemical engineering, or life science that includes use of the research literature and instruction in intermediate experimental and theoretical procedures and techniques specific to the cadet's program of study. Under the direct supervision of faculty. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH363 SEPARATION PROCESSES 3.5 This course covers methods for the physical separation of chemicals. Topics include dew point and bubble point calculations, adiabatic flash, distillation, chromatography, liquid-liquid and gas-liquid absorption. Students are taught the significance of staging of unit operations. Heavy emphasis is placed on theory of operation, numerical methods of solution, and simulation. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH371 INTRO TO ANALYTICAL CHEM 3.5 The course teaches the fundamental concepts of analytical chemistry. Topics include acid-base equilibria, redox potentials, compleximetric titrimetry, separations, electrochemistry, and absorption spectroscopy. The course provides an overview of modern analytical techniques being used in various fields. The course emphasizes the development of rigorous laboratory techniques and introduces the cadet to computer based data acquisition. Cadet laboratory work is evaluated in terms of the student's ability to accurately determine the identity and quantity of an unknown sample. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH375 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY 3.5 This course consists of an examination of the unity and diversity of life. It investigates why there are so many different life forms and proceeds through Mendelian Genetics, the discovery of cells and chromosomes, DNA replication, and genetic expression. These topics then serve as a foundation knowledge supporting the study of population genetics, biodiversity, bioenergetics, animal and plant physiology, population ecology and ecosystem ecology. Emphasis is placed on related course material to current environmental issues and disease, particularly as these areas apply to military operations. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH383 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 3.5 Organic chemistry I is an introduction to the relationship between chemical structure and the physical and chemical properties of molecules. A qualitative description of structure and bonding is presented. The relationships between free energy changes and equilibria, and between activation energy and rate of reaction are developed. Stereochemistry and isomerism are explored. The concept of the mechanism of reaction is presented and the relationships between mechanism, the least energy path, stable intermediates and transition states are exemplified by the reactions of the alkanes, alkenes, alkyl halides, and alcohols. The use of instrumental methods of structural analysis is also introduced. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH388 GENETICS 3 Genetics is the science of heredity. It is concerned with the physical and chemical properties an organismýs genome, how the genome is transmitted from one generation to the next, and how genes are expressed in the development and function of an organism. Heredity is the process by which all living things produce offspring like themselves. This capacity for self-reproduction involves the transmission from parent to offspring of genetic information. This course is intended to develop an understanding the basic principles of genetics and to develop an ability to apply these principles to solve problems involving heredity. These genetic principles are built on a foundational understanding of DNA structure and replication, as well as basic cellular processes such as transcription and translation. Students will learn basic Mendelian genetics and progress to more complex genetic problems. These principles will be applied in the laboratory through the completion of a Mendelian genetics project. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH389 ADVANCED LAB PROJECTS I 1.5 The development of usable protocols, procedures, or laboratory experiments to advance current research projects directed by a member of the faculty. Individual cadets must gain the consent of the faculty member and present project title and scope of proposed effort for Program Director approval. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH390 ADVANCED LAB PROJECTS II 1.5 The development of usable protocols, procedures, or laboratory experiments to advance current research projects directed by a member of the faculty. Project can be either a continuation of CH389 or a new project limited to the scope of 1.5 credit hours. Individual cadets must gain the consent of the faculty member and present project title and scope of proposed effort for Program Director approval. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH457 MICROBIOLOGY 3.5 This course introduces the diversity of microorganisms in all three domains of life. The course covers prokaryotic cell structure and function, growth, genetics, and metabolism. The course will survey five major groups of microorganisms: eubacteria, archaea, protozoa, fungi and viruses including ecology, their role in human disease and their applications in medicine, industry and warfare. Cadets have the opportunity to explore both a viral and a bacterial disease in-depth and present their findings in a briefing and a paper. The 18-hour laboratory program focuses on practical applications of concepts covered in class, with a particular emphasis on the eubacteria. The lab program culminates with a hands-on laboratory examination. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH459 CHEM ENGR LABORATORY 3.5 This course provides laboratory experience in selected chemical engineering unit operations, such as gas absorption, evaporation, distillation, liquid-liquid extraction, cooling tower, heat exchanger, and chemical reactors. Process control and process safety are emphasized in laboratory and classroom instruction. Written and oral reports required. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH472 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3.5 This course features an in-depth study of main group and transition elements and their compounds, with emphasis on chemical bonding and both atomic and molecular structures. The fundamentals of quantum chemistry to include the valence bond and molecular orbital theories as applied to inorganic chemistry are studied. An introduction to symmetry/group theory, coordination chemistry/crystal field theory, chemistry in aqueous and nonaqueous solutions, and organometallic compounds are also included in the course. Chemical principles and spectroscopic techniques will also be emphasized. Journal articles from the chemical literature are used to supplement the text with topics of current interest. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH473 BIOCHEMISTRY 3.5 This course is an introduction to biochemical systems and concentrates on studying them from the molecular approach. Three themes are emphasized: 1) Structure - Function relationships, 2) Metabolism, and 3) Regulation of the systems and processes studied. The fundamental goals of the course are to provide students the basic knowledge of biochemistry and to give them a framework for analyzing problems and questions in life science studies. Additional emphasis is placed on familiarizing students with the experimental techniques used in biochemistry and their application to current issues of interest. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH474 INSTRU METHODS OF ANALYSIS 3.5 A laboratory course designed to develop proficiency in the selection and use of modern instrumental methods of chemical analysis. Topics include atomic spectroscopy, molecular absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry, and chromatography. The laboratory program includes a Capstone experimental procedure and methodology design component. Cadet laboratory work is evaluated in terms of the student's ability to determine the proper instrumental methodology to analyze a chemical sample. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH481 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I 3.5 The major areas of study in this course are chemical thermodynamics with a special focus on chemical equilibrium, and chemical kinetics, introduction to intermolecular interactions. Some of the specific topics covered include properties of real gases, the kinetic theory of gases, the laws of thermodynamics as related to chemical systems, diffusion as a description of mass transport, rates of chemical reactions, and molecular reaction dynamics. The laboratory program illustrates the fundamental topics covered through precision measurements, utilizing modern instrumental and computational methods. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH485 HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER 3.5 This course includes the study of the mechanisms of energy and mass transport, with special emphasis on applications in chemical and biological systems. Coverage includes Fourier's Law of Heat Conduction, and Fick's Law of Diffusion, the development of shell energy and species balances, and the use of these equations to solve for temperature and concentration profiles in chemical engineering systems. An important emphasis in the course is the use of transport equations to understand species diffusion, convection, and chemical reaction in equipment design. This course includes completion of a comprehensive design problem. This design problem provides the opportunity for students to apply engineering science to the design of a comprehensive chemical engineering system. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH489 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH I 3 This undergraduate research course is designed to significantly advance the cadetýs knowledge and comprehension of science and/or engineering by answering a real world scientific question. Course work includes defining a problem, understanding related issues, designing an experimental approach, analyzing data, and drawing conclusions. By applying the scientific method to attempt to solve an actual problem, cadets will expand their critical thinking and intellectual capability. Cadets are supervised by a faculty advisor with expertise in the chosen research area. Cadets conduct research individually but may be part of a larger group working on a project with a broad scope. The minimum requirement for moving onto CH490 is a defined problem and hypothesis, a background in related research, and an experimental design. The Head of the Department will approve cadet projects. Lessons and labs will be established through consultation between cadet and advisor. Requirements include both written and oral progress reports. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH490 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH II 3 With the same outcome goal as CH489 of significantly advancing the cadet's knowledge and comprehension of science and engineering into answering a real world scientific question, this course typically involves experimentation, data analysis, data evaluation, and publishing results. Cadets are supervised by a faculty advisor with expertise in the chosen research area. Cadets conduct research individually but may be part of a larger group working on a project with a broad scope. This course could conclude in a poster presentation, publication and/or a conference presentation as the undergraduate researcher contributes to the larger scientific community. Requirements include both a written final report and an oral presentation. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH491 ADVANCED INDIVIDUAL STUDY I 3 This undergraduate research course is structured similarly to both CH489 and CH490. In this course, a cadet may continue on an established research problem or begin a new line of investigation. The minimum requirement for moving onto CH491 is a defined problem and hypothesis, a background in related research, and an experimental design. Requirements include both written and oral progress reports. Written recommendation from Department Head must be presented to ORD and approved by the Dean of the Academic Board as this course constitutes a third semester of independent study. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CH492 ADVANCED INDIVIDUAL STUDY II 3 The Advanced Individual Study provides cadets the unique opportunity to complete a carefully defined question or problem researched over the course of the previous 1.5 to 2 years. Based in research, this problem may be critical, experimental, applied, or creative in nature, and represents an effort to make an original contribution to the field. The Research Thesis is a culmination of a research effort that goes beyond normal requirements of the major and represents the cadet's best work in their discipline. Each thesis must demonstrate clear critical thinking, a mastery of disciplinary material, clarity in communication of complex ideas, and professionalism in production. Cadets must complete a written thesis and present an oral thesis defense to the faculty and staff. Additionally cadets having completed a year of research on one topic would be able to explore another researcher topic altogether. Written recommendation from Department Head must be presented to ORD and approved by the Dean of the Academic Board. Department of Chemistry & Life Science
CS301 FUND OF COMPUTER SCIENCE 3.5 This is the first course for cadets enrolled in the computer science major. This course presents a thought-provoking introduction to the key concepts throughout the field. Cadets develop their understanding of programming (to include modular design) and problem-solving skills begun in IT 105, then launch their computer science studies by focusing on software, data organization, and other topics. Exercises in the design and implementation of software systems are required. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
CS350 DATABASE DESIGN & IMPLEMENT 3 This course addresses the analysis, design and implementation of relational database applications. Implementation techniques and considerations are discussed and practiced extensively. Key concepts include analysis and design using a standardized notation such as the unified modeling language (UML), data model to logical schema conversion techniques, normalization, transaction processing, and client-server architectures. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
CS384 DATA STRUCTURES 3 This course is designed to build on the cadet's basic programming knowledge. Major emphasis is placed on object-based design, programming methodology, algorithms and algorithm analysis, data structures, and abstract data types as tools for the analysis, design, and implementation of software modules to meet specified requirements. Cadets will learn and employ several well-known algorithms and data structures. Techniques of searching, sorting, recursion, and hashing will be examined. Data structures such as sets, heaps, linked lists, stacks, queues, and trees will be covered. A block-structured programming language reflecting comprehensive support for good software engineering principles will be the foundation of application-oriented exercises. Cadets will design software solutions by employing problem decomposition and selecting the appropriate algorithms and abstract data types. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
CS401 SOFTWARE SYSTEMS DESIGN I 3.5 This course is the first in the senior-level sequence dealing with software systems. It provides cadets with an integrative engineering design and implementation experience as they pursue a solution to a complex, real-life problem. Conceptual material stresses requirements definition and problem solving strategies applied to the design and implementation of software systems. Hierarchical abstractions, modeling, and user interface issues are examined and integrated with a study of the software life cycle, requirements specification, and verification and validation issues. Cadets also learn and employ additional advanced computing techniques that prepare them for the more complex portions of project implementations during CS402. Potential topic areas to be covered may include distributed computation, software quality measurement, or portable application interfaces. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
CS403 OBJECT ORIENTED CONCEPTS 3 This course builds on the fundamental programming skills from prerequisite courses to explore advanced concepts used in modern object oriented software design to create software that is robust, reusable, and extensible in varying problem domains. Cadets gain confidence in their abilities to model, implement, and test solutions to demanding programming problems. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
CS474 FUNDAMENTLS-COMPUTER THEORY 3 Grounds the cadet in the essentials of theory of computation: formal languages, automata, and computability theory. Frames computation in the context of the Chomsky hierarchy, the polynomial and exponential time hierarchies, and the decidability hierarchy. Explores fundamental limits on computation: what problems can never be solved, what problems can be solved but are intractable, and the class NP of problems that are thought to be intractable, but for which no proof of intractability exists to date. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
CS476 COMPILER DESIGN 3 Introduces the cadet to classical design including lexical analysis, symbol table construction, parsing, semantic analysis through attribute evaluation, code generation, and optimization. Related tools such as interpreters, text processors, and file processors are also discussed. Classroom presentation includes many demonstrations of operating compiler fragments and the study of real compiler internals. A multi-part, semester-long term project parallels the syllabus, providing the opportunity to put classroom discussion to immediate use in writing a compiler. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
CS478 PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES 3 Concepts of high-level programming language design are explored in detail. Cadets will examine the fundamental issues of programming language design and use this knowledge as a framework for comparison of different high-level languages. Cadets will study concepts from some or all of the imperative, functional, object-oriented, concurrent, and logic programming language paradigms. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
CS481 OPERATING SYSTEMS 3 The operating system controls the computer itself and provides a useful interface for users and application programs. The operating system controls all the computer resources: processors, main storage, secondary storage, I/O devices, and files. It determines which programs will be in memory at any given time and the order in which programs will run. The operating system should resolve conflicts between processes, attempt to optimize the performance of the computer, allow the computer to communicate with other computers, and maintain a record of actions performed as it goes about its system tasks. This course investigates the basic design issues encountered in order to produce an operating system that can address the above problems in an efficient manner. These concepts are reinforced by a series of programming projects that include both design and implementation. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
CS484 COMPUTER NETWORKS 3 This course provides cadets with an introduction to computer networks by breaking the subject into comprehensible parts and building a survey of the state of the art. The goal of the course is to provide each cadet with basic concepts necessary to understand the design and operation of computer networks. Taking a layered approach, it examines the internet with an emphasis on the TCP/IP protocol suite. Additionally, basic principles including multiplexing, switching, flow control, and error control are covered. Internetworking and its application to both local and wide area networks are also investigated. The course offers an understanding of the current status and future directions of technology and how technology relates to standards. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
CS485 SPEC TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCI 3 This course provides in-depth study of a special topic in computer science not offered elsewhere in the USMA curriculum. Course content will be based on the special expertise of the visiting professor or a senior computer science faculty member. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
CS486 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 3 The course provides an introduction to the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI). Cadets will develop an appreciation for the domain of AI and an understanding of the current interest and research in the field. The historical ideas and techniques of AI and the resulting set of concepts will be covered. Classic programs will be covered as well as underlying theory. Topics include a history of computer problem solving, heuristic search techniques, knowledge representation, knowledge engineering, predicate calculus, and expert and/or rule based systems. Advanced topics that may be covered include intelligent agents, genetic algorithms, neural networks, fuzzy logic, robotics, vision, natural language processing, learning, and the programming languages of AI. The course will emphasize the practical application of artificial intelligence to industry and business as well as DoD. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
CS489 ADV IND STUDY COMPUTER SCI 3 The detailed syllabus of this elective will be tailored to the specific project and to qualifications of the cadet. The research or study program will be proposed by the cadet or selected from those proposed by the department. The cadet will formalize a proposal, design a viable research plan, and conduct research under the guidance and supervision of a faculty advisor. The Head of the Department will approve cadet projects. Lessons and labs established by consultation between cadet and advisor. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
CS489A ADV IND STUDY COMPUTER SCI 3 Same as CS489. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
DS310 TACTICS 3 Tactics is the employment of units in combat. This course provides an in-depth study of the art and science of tactics, mission analysis, as well as military decision making at the tactical level of war. DS310 is required for students majoring in Defense and Strategic Studies (DSS) and is open to students outside of DSS as an elective. Regardless of academic major or future branch, the study of tactics is applicable and necessary for all who intend on succeeding in the profession or arms. DS310 presents the course material in three blocks of instruction. Block I, the Fundamental of Tactics, focuses on the evolution of the art and science of tactics, as well as the doctrine governing US Army tactics. Block II explores the various tactical environments of conventional units conducting conventional operations. Block III looks at the tactical environments of conventional units confronted with irregular warfare (IW) environments. This block also highlights the emerging importance and associated complexities of conventional units involved in Foreign Internal Defense (FID), aka Military Transition Teams (MTT). Department of Military Instruction
DS345 MILITARY INNOVATION 3 This interdisciplinary course examines the subject of military innovation or transformation from a theoretical, historical and policy oriented perspective. Using the U.S. Army as the primary object of inquiry, the course addresses several key questions: Why do militaries innovate? How does this process of innovation occur? Why do attempts at military innovation succeed or fail? The first course block introduces competing theoretical explanations that provide a framework for understanding military innovation at the systemic, state and organizational levels of analysis. Block two of the course examines several historical cases of U.S. Army transformation in the 20th Century and their effect on the U.S. Army today. The final course block analyzes the U.S. Army's current attempts at transformation. This block explores the possibility of a recent Revolution in Military Affairs and considers the dilemmas of future U.S. Army transformation given emerging technology, current operational requirements and the international security environment. Department of Military Instruction
DS350 MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS 3 DS350 is a communication course grounded in application of sound communication techniques relevant to the tactical and strategic levels of war as well as communication techniques applicable for the proper delivery and reception of messages in a professional organization. Department of Military Instruction
DS360 SP OPNS/LOW-INTENSITY CONFLICT 3 This course is divided into two sub-courses. The first sub-course examines the class of military operations commonly referred to as low intensity conflict (LIC). It explores the nature and dynamics of LIC with particular attention to the differences between LIC and conventional, mid to high intensity conflict. Specifically, cadets will examine insurgency and counterinsurgency, international terrorism, and peace operations and strategy and tactics appropriate for each. The second sub-course examines Special Operations Forces (SOF). This sub-course explores the unique methods of special operators and the close relationship between SOF and LIC. Cadets will examine how U.S. SOF are organized; how special operations in general succeed; and why SOF are particularly well suited to LIC. Several subject matter expert guest speakers are integrated into the instruction throughout the course. Department of Military Instruction
DS385 SUSTAINING THE FORCE 3 This course introduces cadets to the principles of logistics and the critical factors that affect sustaining military operations. The first block focuses on the principles of logistics and characteristics of logistical support, identifying the fundamentals of logistical planning of both tactical missions and expeditionary operations. The second block focuses on sustaining combat operations at the tactical level of war, applying the principles of logistics to military operations from the perspective of both mounted and dismounted junior leaders. The third block of instruction focuses on case studies, examining operations in which logistics led to success or failure on the battlefield. Cadets will leave the class with an understanding of the fundamentals of logistical planning, and an understanding of the challenges of sustaining units in combat. Students will be equipped to conduct doctrinal analysis of the logistical planning and execution of past military operations, and identify the aspects of sustainment that contributed to victory or defeat. Department of Military Instruction
DS455 COMPARATIVE MILITARY SYSTEMS 3 This course's objective is to analyze the defense policies of various countries and the outcomes of those defense policies, to include national security objectives, national military objectives, military doctrine, force structure, and military capabilities. Countries studied will include actual and potential coalition partners and potential adversaries. Cadets will examine the political, economic, and social influences on each military establishment. Cultural influences on the development and implementation of the defense policies for countries studied will be examined, including the effects each country's culture has on the missions, structure, roles, and capabilities of the military. Cadets will develop their own framework of analysis to critically analyze the defense polices and cultures of other countries, and will be able to clearly articulate that analysis through written and oral means. Guest speakers include liaison officers and Foreign Area Officers to provide insight into the specific military establishments of those countries studied. Department of Military Instruction
DS460 COUNTERINSURGENCY OPERATIONS 3 DS460, Counterinsurgency Operations, exists in order that cadets will 1) demonstrate a theoretical and pragmatic understanding of insurgencies, to include their temperaments, composition, strategies, employment, and irregular battlefield operating systems; 2) demonstrate a theoretical and pragmatic understanding of counter-insurgency operations, and the interrelationships between the environment, operations, enemies, and strategies; 3) demonstrate a command of historical U.S. counter-insurgency doctrinal concepts, how they relate to theory and strategy, where they are inadequate, and where they are beneficial; 4) demonstrate sound analysis and application of key course concepts using historical case studies; and 5) improve oral and written communication skills. This course begins broadly and then narrows in order to integrate theory and strategy with tactics and practicality. The first sub-course introduces the insurgency, an understanding of which is essential to leading, organizing, and implementing successful operations against it. In the second sub-course, students examine counter-insurgency operations from theoretical, strategic, operational, tactical, and practical perspectives. The final sub-course presents three historical case studies intended to engage each student's learning with both analysis and application. At a minimum, DS460 requirements include: an oral presentation that evaluates the success or failure of an historical insurgency; a short biographical paper on the methods and persona of an historical irregular warrior; a WPR that requires cadets to think through a counterinsurgency scenario in branch specific roles; and a TEE that requires cadets to examine methodologies from successful historical case studies within the scenario of a failed historical case study. Department of Military Instruction
DS470 MILITARY STRATEGY 3 This course provides an overview of how national security strategy is translated into effective military strategy. The course addresses three central issues: (1) the appropriate ends of military strategy, (2) the ways we use our military capabilities to achieve national objectives, (3) and the means applied to achieved desired strategic end states. The first part of the course focuses on strategic fundamentals to include enduring theoretical approaches to strategy and basic strategic principles. Next, we apply knowledge from the first part of the course to assess strategy through the detailed examination of historical case studies. Finally, we examine current US strategic systems and how national-level strategy is synthesized into effective theater level military strategy. This includes examination of the roles and responsibilities of the various combatant commands, the examination of regional strategic issues and how our military addresses those issues, as well as the limitations of military force in the 21st century security environment. Department of Military Instruction
DS489 ADV IND STUD-DEF/STRAT STUDIES 3 The course provides an environment that is conducive to independent effort in a subject area of special interest to the cadet. Original research or specialized study can be accomplished in any of the many fields within Defense and Strategic Studies. The course is conducted in three phases. First, the cadet and the individual advisor from the Defense and Strategic Studies faculty will reach agreement on a subject area for research. Research methods will be studied under the direction of the faculty member. Research may involve field trips and personal interviews with experts in the area of study. In the second phase, the cadet will engage in independent research and prepare a draft analytical paper or report detailing the findings. During this period, frequent consultation with the faculty advisor occurs regarding the progress in the project. In the third phase, the cadet will present and define the findings before a faculty committee. Department of Military Instruction
EE300 FUNDAMENTALS OF DIGITAL LOGIC 3 This is a course for non-electrical engineering majors that covers the analysis, design, simulation, and construction of digital logic circuits and systems. The material in this course provides the necessary tools to design digital hardware circuits such as clocks and security devices, as well as computer hardware. The course begins with the study of binary and hexadecimal number systems, Boolean algebra, and their application to the design of combinational logic circuits. The first half of the course focuses on combinational logic designs. The second half of the course emphasizes sequential logic circuits like memory systems, counters, and shift registers. Laboratory work reinforces the course material by requiring cadets to design and implement basic digital circuits. Throughout the course, the focus is on how the various digital hardware devices are used to perform the internal operations of a computer. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
EE301 FUNDAMENTALS OF ELEC ENGIN 3.5 This first course in electrical engineering for the non-electrical engineering major provides a foundation in basic circuit theory and analysis, power in circuits and electric power systems, and analog electronics. Lectures, laboratory work, classroom demonstrations and discussions showing practical applications emphasize and illustrate the fundamental theories and concepts presented in the course. Engineering design is reflected in laboratory work and minor design problems. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
EE360 DIGITAL COMPUTER LOGIC 3.5 This course covers the analysis, design, simulation, and construction of digital logic circuits and systems. The material in this course provides the necessary tools to design digital hardware circuits such as digital clocks and locks, as well as computer hardware. The course begins with the study of binary and hexadecimal number systems, Boolean algebra, and their application to the design of combinational logic circuits. The first half of the course focuses on designs using small-scale integration (SSI) logic circuits, medium-scale integration (MSI) circuits, and programmable logic devices (PLDs) to implement combinational logic functions. The second half of the course emphasizes sequential logic circuits like counters and sequence recognizers, and also covers memory systems. Laboratory work in this half of the course focuses on using very high speed integrated circuit hardware description language (VHDL) to simulate digital systems and to program those systems into PLDs. As a final project, cadet teams design, build, and test a digital logic system such as a programmable alarm clock, digital lock, or burglar alarm. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
EE362 INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONICS 3.5 This course continues cadet education in electrical engineering through the study of basic electronic devices and circuits. It begins with an introduction to the ideal operational amplifier and its applications. It then covers the operation of the pn-junction diode and the bipolar junction transistor (BJT) in DC, large-signal, and small-signal regimes. The course emphasizes single-stage amplifier design. The course concludes with an introduction to field-effect transistors and the design, analysis, simulation, building, and testing of a two-stage audio amplifier. Three laboratory exercises, three mini-labs, and computer-aided simulations using the Cadence suite of software supplement the lectures with practical circuit analysis, design, construction and testing. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
EE375 INTRO TO COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE 3 This course provides an introduction to computer organization and computer architecture. It builds on digital logic theory and devices (as studied in EE360) to develop more complex systems. Emphasis is placed on understanding the basics of computer system organization, design, and operation. This includes the use of Register Transfer Language (RTL) to describe the movement of data in the computer and assembly language programming to control the system at a higher level. Additionally, students are introduced to modern engineering design tools through the use of VHDL (VHSIC Hardware Description Language) as they design, simulate and program a simple processor. Other topics such as microprogram control, RISC architectures, arithmetic processing, input/output, and memory design are introduced. Finally, cadets study contemporary PC organization by examining the operation of a program at the register level. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
EE377 ELECTRICAL POWER ENGNRNG 3 This course provides a study of the fundamentals in two areas of electric
power engineering: electromechanical energy conversion and electric power systems. Steady-state behavior in single-phase and balanced three-phase power circuits is emphasized. The concept of per unit analysis is introduced and used throughout the course. Transformers, AC & DC machines, transmission lines, power systems, power electronic devices, and renewable energy sources are studied. Laboratory exercises demonstrate the electrical, mechanical, and physical characteristics of several of the systems studied. The cadet will apply analysis, design, build, and/or test techniques to a power related project.
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
EE381 SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS 3.5 This course provides a general study of linear system theory and signal representation techniques as preparation for continued study in communications, control, and electronic systems. Topics include the resolution of continuous time signals and discrete time sequences into their images as frequency functions using Fourier series and transforms. The study includes singularity functions, convolution, convergence properties, and transform properties. The Laplace transform and its inverse provide a method for determining the system function for systems described by differential equations, while the z-transform and its inverse provide a method of analysis for difference equations. The course includes a brief study of communication system principles to include samplimg and a study of analog and digital (both finite and infinite impulse response) filter design. Laboratory exercises in the course consist of learning the engineering software program MATLAB and its use in generating and processing signals. In addition to exposing students to the engineering software program MATLAB, laboratory periods provide opportunities for instructor-assisted problem solving. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
EE401 ELECTRONIC SYSTEM DESIGN I 3.5 This course is part of a two-semester team design experience in electrical engineering that integrates math, science, and engineering into a comprehensive system. The system design encompasses both analog and digital electronics, and may also include sub-systems. Projects are open-ended and must result in a product that performs within pre-determined or negotiated constraints. The system design problem draws from a variety of science and engineering experiences within the curriculum and requires significant cadet creativity and decision-making. Acceptable solutions must address technological, social, political, economic, and ethical considerations. Classroom instruction addresses design methodologies and common system components. Course requirements include periodic in-progress reviews, written and oral reports. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
EE450 MILITARY ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS 3 This is the capstone course of a three course series of courses designed to
introduce non-electrical engineering majors to the fundamentals of electrical engineering. These key concepts are then used to interface various sensors and actuators with a simple microprocessor using experiments that demonstrate some basic applications of a simple robot. Finally, cadets design a robot to autonomously navigate a simple maze that simulates some practical military robotics applications.
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
EE482 WIRELESS COMM SYS ENGINEERING 3 This course provides an introduction to wireless systems engineering with applications to voice and data networks. Description of well known systems such as cell phones, pagers, and wireless LAN's is presented along with the design considerations for deployment of wireless networks. Wireless radio channel modeling along with common impairments such as multipath fading are introduced and modulation techniques well suited to the wireless applications are presented. Receivers for the various modulation schemes are analyzed in terms of performance and the trade-offs offered by source and channel coding are presented. Multiple access techniques used in wireless applications are introduced and the design of networks described. The course concludes with an analysis and description of deployed systems along with their standards and services provided. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
EE484 ADV CMPTR ARCHTR USG VHDL 3 The course builds on the computer architecture foundation provided in EE375. The functional block diagram approach and evolution into the Hardware Description Language paradigm, using the DOD-standard VHDL, introduced in the basic architecture course, is expanded to include advanced architectural issues. The reduced instruction set computer (RISC) architecture serves as the basis for the study of advanced issues. Emphasizing register transfer notation and behavioral modeling of discrete system components, hierarchical structure models of representative machines are designed and simulated. Cache memory, virtual memory, instruction pipelining, branch prediction, hazard avoidance and computer arithmetic are the major topics studied. The term project utilizes VHDL for the behavioral description of a processor and then proceeds through the use of CAD synthesis tools and system simulators. The Term Project is used in lieu of a Term End Examination. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
EE485 SPEC TOPICS IN EE 3 This course provides an in-depth study of special topics in electrical engineering not offered elsewhere in the USMA curriculum. Course content will be based on expertise of a senior electrical engineering faculty member or a Visiting Professor. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
EE489 ADV IND STUDY IN ELECT ENGR 3 Course requirements will be tailored to the needs and qualifications of the individual cadet. The course will normally involve a project requiring research, experimentation, and the submission of a report under the guidance of a departmental advisor. Alternatively, study may take the form of a tutorial course covering material not available in the regular elective course offerings. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
EM381 ENGINEERING ECONOMY 3 This course prepares cadets to consider the economic dimension in the evaluation of engineering alternatives; a consideration vital to the Systems Decision Process, engineering management, systems acquisition and many other application areas. While emphasis is on the analytical consideration of money and its impact on the areas above, the course also incorporates professional ethics in the engineering economic analysis process. The course is taught in four lesson blocks. The Time Value of Money (TVM) block -includes the quantitative methods for economic analysis of engineering alternatives by introducing cost concepts, interest concepts, the cash flow diagram and developing interest formulas. The Analysis Methods block develops techniques for project evaluation and comparison and ways to account for risk and uncertainty. The After Tax Cash Flow block incorporates the real-world effect of taxes, depreciation and inflation into the analysis methods. The Capital Budgeting block completes a comprehensive introduction to engineering economy by introducing the concept of economic service life and project financing. A one lesson introduction to personal finance is included to demonstrate how many of the concepts used in the business world can also be applied for personal planning. Course concepts are applied using Excel in both graded and ungraded labs. Cadets will spend several lessons in a computer lab environment. Department of Systems Engineering
EM384 ANYL METH FOR ENGR MANAGEMENT 3 EM384 focuses on the application of deterministic and probabilistic models used by analysts to make engineering and management decisions. Cadets learn to apply various modeling techniques to represent and solve real-world organizational problems in the military and industry. Topics include: linear and integer programming, network modeling, decision making under uncertainty, queuing, and simulation modeling. Cadets apply concepts and tools using Microsoft Excel within a computer lab environment. The techniques taught in this course have been applied to an increasingly wide variety of complex problems in business, government, military, health care, and education. Ethical responsibilities in describing the results of analyses to decision makers are integrated throughout the course. Cadets develop communication skills through two written reports and make innovative use of spreadsheets to develop and analyze models. Cadets are tested on the application of course concepts from the four blocks of instruction during two graded labs, two out-of-classroom projects, two problem sets, and two in-class WPRs. Cadets will spend several lessons in a computer lab environment. Department of Systems Engineering
EM402 ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT DSN I 3.5 This is the first course in a two-semester capstone design for EM majors. EM402 integrates the principles, concepts and models explored in previous core and engineering topic courses. The course applies the principles of systems design, engineering management, and/or reengineering to a real-world system. Cadets work under the supervision of a faculty mentor to address a problem presented by a real-world client, providing them an integrative experience for their education in engineering design. Department of Systems Engineering
EM411 PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3.5 This course develops skills required to lead an organization to the achievement of their objectives through the proper application of the management of planning, implementing and controlling the organization activities, personnel and resources. The course focuses on the Implementation phase of the Systems Decision Process (SDP). Topics include project selection, roles and responsibilities of the project manager, planning the project, budgeting the project, scheduling the project, allocating resources to the project, monitoring and controlling the project, evaluating and terminating the project, risk assessment and management, organizational structure and human resources. Case studies illustrate problems and how to solve them. Course assignments are designed to help students learn and apply project management techniques taught in the course. The class design project will provide students with the opportunity to integrate project management software, Microsoft Project, into the preparation of an Engineering Management Project Plan. Cadets spend several lessons in a computer lab environment. Department of Systems Engineering
EM420 PRODUCTION OPERATIONS MGMT 3 This course deals with the quantitative aspects of design and analysis of production operations management. Emphasis is on identification, analysis, and solution implementation of production problems using applied quantitative techniques within each of the four phases of the Systems Decision Process (SDP). Practical exercises reinforce the problem-solving techniques necessary for today's successful military and civilian engineering managers and systems engineers. Specific methods and techniques taught and applied are operations strategy, product design and selection, supply chain management, total quality management, forecasting, capacity planning, facility location, facility layout, work system design, inventory management, material requirements planning, and scheduling. This course is required for those pursuing the Engineering Management major, the Systems Engineering major, and the Systems Management major. Cadets will spend two to four lessons in a computer lab environment. Department of Systems Engineering
EM481 SYSTEMS SIMULATION 3 Cadets learn and explore discrete event simulation techniques and tools used to analyze and improve complex systems. Applications include operations, transportation, manufacturing and logistics systems. Topics include functional modeling with functional flow diagrams and IDEF0 models, simulation theory, the modeling process, input data analysis, generation and testing of random numbers, verification and validation of simulation models, experimental design, output analysis, and application using simulation software. The course concepts provide cadets the tools to evaluate military and civilian systems. Emphasis is placed on using simulation in the Systems Decision Process (SDP). Cadets demonstrate proficiency and develop communication skills through design projects and briefings. Cadets spend several lessons in a computer lab environment. Department of Systems Engineering
EM482 SUPPLY CHAIN ENG & INFO MGMT 3 This course teaches cadets the strategic importance of good supply chain design, planning, operation, business processes, and information management systems. Cadets will become familiar with engineering a supply chain network, conducting inventory management, and executing risk pooling to maintain a competitive advantage. Cadets develop the ability to evaluate how information flows can substitute for the stock of physical resources, such as inventory, and why such systems succeed or fail through the explanation of concepts, insights, practical tools, and information technology that supports decision making. This course will focus on understanding the key drivers of a supply chain such as supply contracts, procurement and outsourcing, information sharing, supply chain integration, and distribution practices. Cadets will then apply their knowledge of Supply Chain Engineering and Information Management to SAP Enterprise Resource Planning software simulations to demonstrate their understanding of the business processes and information systems management. Cadets will also learn to assess the impact of strategic alliances and globalization on supply chain strategies and best practices, to include smart pricing, customer value, and new product and supply chain design. Department of Systems Engineering
EN101 COMPOSITION 3 This course aims to develop clear, logical, and grammatically correct expression in written discourse. Daily writing and revision reinforce instruction in the writing process. Organization, substance, style, and correctness are major concerns of the course. Department of English and Philosophy
EN102 LITERATURE 3 This course studies ways in which writers use language imaginatively. Cadets develop the writing techniques of EN101 in responding to assignments on selected works of literature from diverse authors. Department of English and Philosophy
EN302 ADVANCED COMPOSITION 3 This course refines basic writing skills, develops sophisticated techniques of written expression, and establishes a critical editorial sense with respect to the cadet's own composition and the writing of others. Exemplary readings give substance to daily writing, while revision and extensive counseling emphasize the requirement for organization, substance, style, and correctness. Department of English and Philosophy
EP333 CULTURAL STUDIES 3 This course analyzes a culture through the study of its art, philosophy, and literature. It not only acquaints cadets with a particular period and place but also introduces them to various definitions of culture and to recent themes and debates in cultural studies. The work of theorists as diverse as Matthew Arnold, Walter Benjamin, Raymond Williams, and Laura Mulvey informs this team-taught course's interdisciplinary approach to cultural artifacts as well as its investigation of aesthetics, ideology, and issues of ethnicity, gender, and class. Typical areas of focus include Augustan Rome, Enlightenment France, and Meiji Japan. Cadets should take this course early in their program of study. Department of English and Philosophy
EP341 BRITISH LITERATURE I 3 This course is an introduction to the study of British literature, ranging from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century. Cadets will encounter representative masterworks from the Old English, Medieval, Renaissance, and Neoclassical periods, exploring in the process the development of literary forms, the culture of the British Isles, and the English language itself. Possible areas of emphasis include narrative and lyric poetry from all these periods, drama from the Middle Ages and Renaissance, the periodical essay from the Neoclassical period, and the emergence of the novel as a distinct form of literature in the eighteenth century. Department of English and Philosophy
EP351 WORLD LITERATURE 3 This course enhances cadets' cultural awareness and refines their disciplinary knowledge and interpretive skills by introducing them to major literary texts from around the globe. As an advanced exercise in comparative study and synthesis, World Literature builds on core courses such as EN302 and foreign language offerings. The prose and poetry of a variety of periods and a range of countries provide contexts for and contrasts to the Anglo-American tradition. In a given semester typical texts could include epics and tragedies of Ancient Greece and Rome, Russian novels, works of medieval Islamic literature, haiku of Japan, Continental European novels of the nineteenth century, or postmodern fiction of South America. This course familiarizes students not only with important literary forms and genres but also with cultural and historical contexts for many of the most pressing issues in our volatile world. Department of English and Philosophy
EP363 POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 3 Examining the major theories and problems in the history of political philosophy from Plato to Rawls and emphasizing contemporary theory, this course includes such topics as liberty, equality, political authority, the obligation to obey the State, civil disobedience, anarchism, liberalism, conservatism, democracy, meritocracy, affirmative action, and global politics. Department of English and Philosophy
EP365 ETHICS-MILITARY PROFESSION 3 The fundamental values and principles of the warrior ethos can be traced back to ancient Greece and Rome. These values provide the moral boundaries of the military profession and distinguish members of this profession from other individuals and groups who employ violence to achieve their ends. Cadets in this course will examine the moral principles that define the profession of arms, both in terms of when the use of force is permissible (or even obligatory) to achieve political objectives, and what, if any, limits ought to govern how that force is used. Department of English and Philosophy
EP367 DRAMA 3 This course surveys significant plays from a variety of periods and traditions to give cadets an appreciation of a genre that exists as both written literature and creative interpretation. Works to be studied range from the classical tragedies of ancient Greece through the great products of the English renaissance to modern efforts by British and American playwrights. Although the primary focus rests upon the Anglo-American tradition, the course will not neglect dramatists from other countries and cultures. Department of English and Philosophy
EP371 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ART HISTORY 3 This course will provide an in-depth examination of a specific topic in visual culture, closely investigating the way images and monuments engage with and discuss economic, cultural, socio-political, and historical forces. In addition to examining the images and their context, students will explore the various ways those objects have been interpreted and understood by historians, artists, and critics. Classroom discussion will be supplemented by trip sections to New York City to see many of the actual images and monuments under investigation. Possible topics might include Modernism/Postmodernism, History of Photography, and The Visual Culture of War. Department of English and Philosophy
EP375 MODERN PHILOSOPHY I 3 This colloquium provides cadets an opportunity for reading and analysis in depth of some of the seminal works in modern philosophy. Taught in seminar format, the course challenges first-class and second-class cadets to take responsibility for discussion and analysis and for drawing connections between ideas as they occur throughout history and across cultures. The early focus of the course will be on two schools of European thought, Rationalism and Empiricism, guided the early development of modern Western philosophy. Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz are recognized as the leading Rationalists. The chief Empiricists include Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley and Hume. The latter part of the course will examine the ideas of Immanuel Kant. Department of English and Philosophy
EP433 SENIOR SEMINAR 3 This APL integrative course develops an archetypal concept that crosses disciplinary boundaries and promotes a synthesis of aspects of the core curriculum. It contributes to the overarching goal of helping cadets "to anticipate and respond effectively to the uncertainties of a changing technological, social, political, and economic world." The archetype subjects will incorporate insights from both the sciences and the humanities, with emphasis on manifestations of the archetype in art, philosophy, and literature. The seminar will typically integrate art, technology, and language. Archetypal themes, the organizing element for the course that will change periodically, could be selected from the following possibilities: the WARRIOR, the BRIDGE, the CITY, the ALIEN, the SHIP, and the PRISON. Department of English and Philosophy
EP487 SENIOR THESIS I 3 This course permits cadets with the requisite energy and talent to initiate a yearlong project requiring research in depth that culminates in a substantial thesis of high scholarly quality. Department of English and Philosophy
EV203 PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 3 This core course provides cadets with a fundamental understanding of scientific principles and processes of earth science, meteorology, climatology, geomorphology and environmental systems, as well as an introduction to cultural geography. Further, the course furnishes cadets with the technical skills - digital terrain analysis, image interpretation and spectral analysis, remote sensing, global positioning system, geographic information systems cartography - to delineate the geographic distribution of landforms, weather, climate, and culture systems; and evaluate their potential impact on military operations. Lessons are reinforced by extensive use of in- and out-of-class practical exercises, terrain walks and computer exercises to demonstrate the interrelationship between physical and human systems, and their impact on the environment. Historical vignettes are employed to demonstrate how the factors of weather, climate, terrain, soils, vegetation and culture are important, cogent and frequently decisive in military operations. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV300 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 3 As the introductory course to the Environmental Engineering Sequence, EV300 provides the cadet with a broad understanding of current global and local environmental issues. It specifically focuses on natural ecosystems processes, the effects of pollution on human health and how the level of risk associated with this pollution is assessed, the environmental effects of energy use, and air pollution concerns such as global climate change, acid rain, and smog. Discussions of anthropogenic influences are conducted with consideration of social, economic, technological and political impacts. Cadets learn to evaluate literature on environmental issues through readings and interactive debates. A course project applying the scientific method to evaluate a current environmental problem provides an opportunity to tie multiple course topics with an in-depth study of an issue of interest. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV301 ENV SCIENCE FOR ENGR & SCIEN 3 This course is similar to EV300 except that the context of discussion in EV301 is appropriate for cadets who have elected to major in science or engineering. EV301 provides the cadet with a broad understanding of current global and local environmental issues. It specifically focuses on natural ecosystems processes, the effects of pollution on human health and how the level of risk associated with this pollution is assessed, the environmental effects of energy use, and air pollution concerns such as global climate change, acid rain, and smog. Discussions of anthropogenic influences are conducted with consideration of social, economic, technological and political impacts. Cadets learn to evaluate literature on environmental issues through readings and interactive debates. A course project applying the scientific method to evaluate a current environmental problem provides an opportunity to tie multiple course topics with an in-depth study of an issue of interest. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV303 FOUNDATIONS IN GEOGRAPHY 3 This course presents the basic concepts, theories and methods of inquiry in the discipline of geography as foundation for advanced study in Human/Regional Geography; Environmental Geography; or Geospatial Information Science. The course includes models and concepts from the many sub-disciplinary (systematic) areas of geography to include cultural, historical, economic, urban, political and military geography. The application of concepts to real-world issues is emphasized. Research skills and techniques used by professional geographers are presented. Cadets use these approaches to spatially analyze and map the distribution of human and environmental phenomena. Several short papers will be assigned. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV365 GEOGRAPHY OF GLOBAL CULTURES 3 This course provides the geographic foundation for study in interdisciplinary and management academic areas. Contemporary regions of the world political map serve as the framework within which geographic concepts and analytical techniques are applied. Each cadet will develop an awareness of the diversity and distribution of people on the earth, human organization and exploitation of territory, and interactions among culture groups. Particular emphasis is placed on social institutions, their impact on economic development, and the subsequent identification and analysis of developed, emerging, and underdeveloped states. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV371 GEOGRAPHY OF RUSSIA 3 This course examines the political, economic, and cultural geography of Russia and its adjacent neighbors; the Baltic states, east central European region, transcaucasus, and central Asia. Topics covered include: the commonwealth of independent states; ecocide in the former soviet union; disposition of the former soviet military; and ethnic rivalries. The objective of the course is to provide the student with an understanding of the recent past of the traditional soviet system in order to understand, as well as geographically evaluate, Russia's and the other former republics' situation today. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV373 GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA 3 This course studies the physical and cultural landscape of Latin America, giving special treatment to the diversity and cultural identity of the region. Topics covered include an historical geography of the region, including pre-columbian civilizations, Iberian, African, and European influences; the geography of transportation networks, agriculture, urbanization, and population. National boundaries, major landforms and climatic conditions are discussed to describe their effect on civilization. This course also investigates the historical relationship between the United States and Latin America and covers recent U.S. military interventions in the region. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV375 GEOGRAPHY OF AFRICA 3 This course examines the cultural and natural diversity of African landscapes, with an emphasis on development, population issues, disease, and the origin, dispersal, spatial organization, and interaction of important cultural groups. Africaýs physical landscapes will also be introduced as the palette upon which Africaýs complex human mosaic has developed. Students will explore, from a geographic perspective, why Africa has seemingly been plagued with problems of economic development, health, and political instability. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV377 REMOTE SENSING 3 Remote Sensing is learning about something without touching it--the most obvious example being the use of satellites to study the Earth. EV377, a techniques course applicable to both the humanities and engineering, studies how and what types of information can be carried by the electromagnetic spectrum. Students enjoy a wide range of practical exercises which introduce them to several remote sensing systems to include conventional and color infrared photography, multispectral scanners, satellite imagery, thermal infrared, and radar. The capstone exercise offers each student the opportunity to perform real-time automated image classification using satellite data on his/her own micro-computer. The course focus is on applying remotely sensed data to solve current problems. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV378 CARTOGRAPHY 3 Cartography teaches the principles of cartographic communication and enables the student to apply map design principles along with computer mapping techniques to solve contemporary problems in geography, economics, international relations, and applied sciences. Cadets will study the basic cartographic design process and use mapping and analysis software in the geographic sciences laboratory to produce topographic and thematic maps. A final course design project presents the opportunity for the cadets to demonstrate their ability to synthesize sound mapping principles. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV380 SURVEYING 3.5 A framework for understanding and applying practical surveying methods is developed. Consideration of error theory and the concepts of precision of and accuracy yields understanding of the probabilistic nature of measurements. The principles of differential leveling, taping, electronic distance measurement and angular measurement are studied and applied using state-of-the-art surveying equipment and software tools. Plane surveys are principally explored, although the fundamentals of geodetic surveys are also presented. Traverse, triangulation, trilateration, level networks and the proper adjustment of related measurements are examined. Control survey, land survey, topographic survey, horizontal and vertical curve design, computer-aided mapping and GIS applications are included. Extensive use of laboratory periods permits application of surveying fundamentals, methods and planning skills to actual field situations. The principles of the global positioning system are explored and applications in the Army and surveying are applied in the final lab exercise. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV384 GEOGRAPHY OF NORTH AMERICA 3 This course provides a regional geography of North America, with balanced coverage of the human and physical geography of the United States and Canada. Lectures are appropriately supplemented with movies, slides, and maps to facilitate understanding of important themes that are prevalent in various subregions. Emphasis is placed on cultural patterns and contemporary environmental issues. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV388A PHYSICAL GEOLOGY 3.5 This course primarily emphasizes learning to identify minerals and rocks and then applying this knowledge to analyze the significant geologic processes that act on and within the earth. These processes include plate tectonics, rock mechanics, geologic mapping, ground and surface water, and elements of mining and petroleum engineering. Field trips are conducted to illustrate how local geology has influenced development and construction in the Hudson Valley. The course is capstoned by an open-ended engineering problem which requires the creative application of geology to design a practical solution to a stated need. Cadets use a geologic exploration simulation to convert given resources optimally including safety and cost factors. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV389B CLIMATOLOGY 3 The course investigates the earth's atmospheric phenomena, giving special attention to the dynamic physical processes which produce weather and result in distinctive climates. The course focus is on how climate influences daily life and activities. Time is devoted to case studies of urban microclimates and attendant problems of atmospheric pollution and scientific efforts to alter the weather. Exercises allow the student to apply climate data and information to problem solving in the fields of engineering, agriculture, land use, and the military. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV391A LAND USE PLAN & MGT 3 An introduction to land use planning and management with focus on the land-law interfaces between the physical, cultural, and legal realms. The course surveys the policies and legislative basis for land use controls at the local, federal and regional levels to include national parks and forests, agricultural lands, rangelands, and military training areas. Natural resource management issues and strategies are explored. The importance of geographic concepts is emphasized in the conduct of applied case studies addressing land use conflicts and environmental strategies. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV394 HYDROGEOLOGY/HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS 3.5 This course covers the principles governing the movement of subterranean water (groundwater), the interaction of this water with the porous medium, and the transport of chemical constituents (contaminants) in the subsurface. Lesson blocks explore traditional background elements of hydraulic engineering to include flow systems for the conveyance of groundwater and drainage systems for groundwater. Computer models are used to evaluate groundwater problems and conduct sensitivity analyses. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV398 GEOG INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3 Geographic information systems are hardware/software systems that permit the input, storage, retrieval, manipulation, analysis, and display of geocoded data. Used by environmentalists, engineers, land-use planners, architects, managers of large land holdings, and the military, these highly-intricate "decision support" systems assist managers in answering important "what if" questions. Using digitizers and microcomputers students will build a geocoded database and solve "real-world" problems. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV402 BIOCHEMICAL TREATMENT 3.5 This course provides cadets with the opportunity to apply the principles of microbiology to the protection and improvement of the environment. This course builds on the concepts learned in EV396, Environmental Biological Systems, and directly applies those concepts to the treatment of wastewater, removal of nutrients from wastewater, anaerobic digestion, bioremediation, industrial waste treatment, and emerging applications of biological treatment and modeling. A comprehensive, multi-step design project serves as the design experience for this course. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV450 ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING 3 This course is the third in a three-course sequence and is concerned with the balance of engineered solutions with economic, socio-cultural, political, and ecological considerations evaluated during a decision-making process. Using management of water resources as a teaching model, the realities of decision-making and policy development for all areas of engineering, and particularly environmental engineering, are examined. The course begins with instruction on the tools available to water resource managers, to include both structural (engineered) and non-structural approaches to solve water resource problems. Elements of engineering design and the design process are introduced as well as methods of conducting tradeoff analyses. The course makes use of case studies of current water resource projects and includes a term project. Visiting speakers are employed to present views of government and concerned public interest groups. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV471 ECOLOGY 3 This course examines ecosystems through the study of ecological principles related to an organism's relationship to its environment, community, and ecosystem. Species, population, community, and ecosystem level interactions and dynamics are emphasized. The fundamental influences of energy flow and material cycling are examined, as well as the unique role of wetlands within ecosystems. The course includes several field trips, which lead to a culminating term project designed to integrate previously acquired environmental science technical skills and ecological principles. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV480 HONORS SEMINAR IN GEOGRAPHY 3 This course will examine major research initiatives in the discipline and delineate their data requirements. The primary objective of this course is to identify and outline the senior thesis, which is the culminating event for the Honors Program. Hence, cadets participating in this course will explore research methods and data sources used by geographers, conduct a critical analysis of seminal literature in the field, define a research problem, identify and evaluate data sources, and assemble a research proposal. The final product of this course will be a written research proposal that will define the senior thesis (written during EV489B). The cadet will make a formal presentation of this proposal to senior geography faculty. The course is conducted in a seminar and one-and-one format. Lessons and labs are established by consultation between the cadet and faculty advisor. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV481 WATER RESOURCES PLAN & DESIGN 3 The course is concerned with effective use of water as a manageable natural resource. It begins with instruction on the tools required by water resource managers to make sound decisions in their field. The course assesses current needs for water and the structural (engineered) and non-structural approaches available to meet these needs. Elements of engineering design and the design process are introduced. The bulk of the course is concerned with assessment of the impacts of various water resources development activities on the economic, socio-cultural and ecological sectors of the environment. Methods for conducting tradeoff analyses among the engineered and environmental aspects of projects are developed and applied in a term project. The course makes use of case studies of current water resource projects. Visiting speakers represent the views of the Federal government and concerned public interest groups. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV483 COLLOQUIUM IN GEOGRAPHY 3 The colloquium is a directed readings course using small group discussions of important literature, methodological traditions, and contemporary research trends in the field of geography. Dependent on instructor preference and individual student interest, in-depth readings will be pursued in one or more of the following areas of geographic study: cultural, political, regional or military geography. Compensatory time is given to permit extra readings. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV485 SPEC TOPICS-GEOG & ENVRNMNT 3 This course explores an advanced topic in Human and Regional Geography, Environmental Geography, Environmental Science, Environmental Engineering, or Geospatial Information Science. Specific subject matter will vary with the expertise of the visiting professor or senior faculty member conducting the course. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV486 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOGRAPHY 3 Whereas physical geographers focus on the earth's surface and atmosphere, and human geographers concentrate on the spatial aspect of human activities, environmental geographers are interested in both how people adapt to specific environments and how they alter those environments through human activities. To understand these interactions and their implications, environmental geographers must fully appreciate natural processes and landform development within and on the surface of the Earth, as well as the implications of human intervention in the natural system. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV489A ADVANCED INDIVIDUAL STUDY I 3 The course is an individually supervised research and study program designed to provide cadets with the opportunity to pursue advanced topics within their discipline. The cadet prepares a research and study proposal setting forth the objectives, scope, and anticipated accomplishments of his/her efforts for the semester. If required for a specific degree, the proposal will include a justification for engineering science or design credit. Once approved, the proposal serves as a basis for the cadet's research and study program. Progress in research reports and observations by the faculty advisor form the basis for grades. The program for each cadet will culminate in one of two outcomes: 1) a discipline-appropriate written product (e.g., senior thesis or design project) with oral defense; or 2) enrollment in EV489B for the completion of the research and study program during the second academic term. Lessons and labs are established by consultation between the cadet and faculty advisor. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
EV498 ADV GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYS 3 This course examines the analytical methods used in Geographic Information systems (GIS) and provides cadets with a clear understanding of the theoretical/conceptual aspects of algorithms found in GIS software. Lectures focus on the underlying mathematical basis for widely used spatial analytical techniques. Among the topics covered are neighborhood operations, map transformation, spatial interpolation, terrain analysis, network analysis, spatial overlay, fuzzy sets, neural networks, and expert systems. In-class practical exercises and laboratory assignments compliment the lectures by providing hands-on experience with a variety of advanced analytical techniques. The course culminates with a capstone term project that allows cadets to identify a scientific problem, formulate a hypothesis, use GIS to solve the problem, and then present the results of their analysis. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
HI103 HISTORY OF THE US 3 These courses treat the history of the United States (in an international context) from the nation's colonial origins to the present. Both surveys explore the American experience by investigating such diverse topics as economic, political, and social evolution, foreign relations developments, the rise of sectionalism, cultural and intellectual growth, group interactions, and the relation between war and society. The courses also introduce methods of historical research and analysis, and seek to develop the cadet's facility for critical thinking and lucid writing, and for participating effectively in oral discussion. Department of History
HI107 WESTERN CIVILIZATION 3 HI 107 is the first half of a two-semester sequence intended to build for cadets a historical foundation before they conduct an in-depth survey of another civilization in HI 108. This course traces the human experience from ancient times until 1914. Beginning with an examination of the origins of Western Civilization in the Middle East, HI 107 then explores the development of Western Civilization through the classical, medieval, early modern, and modern periods, ending with an examination of the causes leading to the First World War. The roots and formative events of the West are examined in depth to provide a cultural, social, economic, political, and military framework for the understanding of Western Civilization. This course also develops methods of historical research and analysis. It seeks to develop the cadet's facility for critical thinking, lucid writing, and effective participation in classroom discussion. Department of History
HI153 ADVANCED HISTORY OF THE US 3 These courses encompass the same chronological period and thematic coverage as HI103-104, but they do so through monographic and periodical literature and greater emphasis on classroom discussion. These courses assume some familiarity with American history and consequently place special emphasis on historical analysis and criticism. Moreover, students acquire a broader understanding of American history and the historian's methods. Department of History
HI157 ADV HISTORY OF THE WORLD 3 These courses encompass the same chronological period and thematic coverage as HI107-108, but they place a greater emphasis on classroom discussion and historical analysis and criticism. Consequently, the student acquires a broader and deeper appreciation of the historian's craft and of essential issues in world history. Department of History
HI301 HISTORY OF THE MILITARY ART 3 This two-term, upperclass core course traces the evolution of the art of war from the ancients through the napoleonic era to the American civil war and the wars of the twentieth century. Emphasis is placed on the changing nature of warfare as nations adjust to social, political, economic and technological developments. Analysis focuses on causation, the interrelationship of events as warfare evolved over the ages, operational and logistical aspects of military history, and the role of society in warfare. Department of History
HI301H HISTORY OF MILITARY ART 3 Tempory course for History Majors enrolled in HI301 Department of History
HI339 THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST 3 This course enables cadets to explore the social, political, economic, and military interactions in the formation of the Modern Middle East. The first block examines the decline of the Gunpowder Empires and the subsequent penetration of European colonialism into the Islamic world (India, North Africa, Egypt, and the Levant), with emphasis on the factors that led to military decline of the Turkic world and the relative economic and military advantages of the European powers. During this block, students will discuss the Middle East's modernizing and reform efforts that European colonialism helped to catalyze, to include democratization, constitutions, capitalism, and industrialization. The second block covers the events that follow the World Wars and subsequent decolonization of the Middle East against the backdrop of the Cold War. Cadets will closely examine the Arab-Israeli conflict, the rise of Arab Nationalism and the tension between military revolutionary dictatorship and attempts at constitutional monarchy and republics. The final phase will begin with the Iranian revolution of 1979 and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. It will consider the rise of political Islam as a revolutionary ideology and the post-Cold War challenges leading to current wars and insurrections. Department of History
HI347 ASIAN WARFARE AND POLITICS 3 This course explores the interaction between warfare and political systems in East Asia. It begins with the transition from military monarchy to bureaucratic empire in the Warring States Period. It then maps the rise of nomadic confederations in the Inner Asian steppe and their strategic interaction with the Han state. It traces how the collapse of the Han state led to military turmoil in East Asia, the rise of hybrid states, a new cosmopolitan empire, and then a multi-state system. It considers how in Japan, the importation of the bureaucratic state led first to centralization and then to the rise of the samurai and a feudal structure. Next, the course examines the development of a new form of nomadic confederation under the Mongols, and how Mongol warfare led to a more centralized state in China, and turmoil and a federalist system in Japan. In the modern period, the course considers how the challenge of Western military force led to political turmoil and the rise of the Communists in China, but in Japan led to the building of the Imperial Army, noted for its competence and for its atrocities. The course concludes with reflection on how the experience of war in East Asia continues to affect the region's politics and political structures. Department of History
HI348 MODERN LATIN AMERICA 3 This course surveys the cultural, economic, political, and social evolution of Latin America from the era of independence to the present. The course begins with a brief examination of Pre-Colombian and colonial events and structures. Students will study the economic development of modern Latin America and its influence on social, political, and military change. Case studies of national histories, such as Mexico, Cuba, Brazil, Argentina, and other countries help to illuminate the broad themes that underlie modern Latin American history. The course will examine Latin American relations with the United States and other nations of the world. Department of History
HI357 WARFARE SINCE 1945 3 The nature of warfare has changed dramatically since 1945. During the Cold War, American policies of containment and collective security collided with attempts at communist expansion. The threat of nuclear war led to an era of limited war, including revolutionary war, wars of national liberation, and civil wars. Cadets will examine the strategic conditions and political considerations influencing the use of force in all types of warfare. They will gain an appreciation for the experiences of soldiers and leaders in combat while analyzing military strategy and exploring the connection between war and society. Department of History
HI358 STRATEGY, POLICY & GENERALSHIP 3 This course examines how political and military leaders develop and execute policy and strategy. The course begins with an examination of the rise of military professionalism and the creation of military staffs in the nineteenth century. It explores how political and military leaders integrate not only military power, but also diplomatic, economic, technological, social, and political resources to achieve a nation's goals. In particular, the course examines the often contentious issues of civil-military relations, joint and coalition warfare, and organizational and doctrinal change. Cadets study the strategic challenges faced by senior civilians and military leaders, thus allowing them to analyze warfare within a broader political-military context. Department of History
HI359 ERA OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR 3 This course examines the Interwar Years, 1919-1939, and the Second World War from a global perspective while using a thematic approach to compare the different experiences of each of the major belligerents. Whether covering the Versailles Treaty, the rise of Adolf Hitler, the US Army during the Great Depression, home fronts, or the Holocaust, the cadets in the course will examine the social, political, cultural, and economic factors that contributed to how belligerents waged war, and, in turn, how war affected each of these factors across the globe. The course covers how and why the belligerents planned and executed particular strategies and operations in the European, Pacific, and China-Burma-India theaters to achieve their coalition and national goals. Finally, this course examines the interrelationship of sea, air, and land forces, and the complexities of providing logistical support to joint and combined operations on an unprecedented scale. Department of History
HI365 THE ANCIENT WORLD 3 This course examines the political development, cultural ideas, and fundamental institutions of the ancient societies that form the basis of Western civilization. The course will focus on civic values that established standards regarding the role of the individual within the community, and how concepts of virtue, duty, and service evolved over time in response to internal and external challenges. It explores in detail significant historical questions such as how Athenian democracy contributed to, and was dramatically affected by, the Peloponnesian Wars, and why the Romans' victory in the Punic Wars planted the seeds for the ultimate demise of the Republic and the transition to the Empire. HI365 also serves as an introduction to historical methods of analyzing primary sources. Cadets will read extensively from histories written by ancient Greek and Roman authors and form their own interpretations of the events the writers cover, their historical methods, and their reliability. Department of History
HI367 IMPERIAL AND SOVIET RUSSIA 3 This course examines the political, social, and cultural history of Russia as it emerged from the Mongol era up to the present day. It explores the development of the Tsarist political and social systems, the emergence of literary, artistic, and revolutionary movements, and the development of Russia's position in European politics from the time of Peter I through WWI. It also covers the rise of the Soviet Union, the leadership's attempts to implement communist ideology and responses to that attempt, Russia's relationship with various national and ethnic groups, and the emergence of the Soviet Union as a superpower. The course concludes with the collapse of the Soviet Union and the emergence of new states in the 1990s. Department of History
HI372 US FGN RELATIONS SINCE 1898 3 This course examines American foreign relations from the nation's entry into the world arena as a major power in 1898 through both World Wars, and the Cold War, to its station in today's multipolar world. It is a study of the forces, events, personalities, and principles that have shaped America's role in the world and provided the framework for the development of current foreign policy. Department of History
HI381 HISTORY OF IRREGULAR WARFARE 3 The course examines unconventional warfare from a historical perspective, particularly conflicts involving opponents with a significant disparity in their conventional military capabilities. Through several case studies, the course explores why belligerents succeed or fail in unconventional warfare and how ideology, technology, and social, political, and economic factors help determine the outcome of wars between regular and irregular forces. Covering a broad period of history, selected case studies include wars of conquest or colonization, revolutionary wars, and peacekeeping or constabulary operations. Department of History
HI391 WORLD RELIGIONS 3 This course analyses the emergence, development and present cultural expression of the major religions of the world, emphasizing their 19th and 20th century experience. It also examines the development of religion in the ancient world and in pre-literate and non-technical societies. Cadets study the world's religions as molded by and as molders of the social, political and economic forces unique to particular cultures. Special attention is paid to the role of each religion in the formulation and adaptation of public and foreign policy. Department of History
HI397 COLD WAR AMERICA 3 This course examines the history of the United States from the end of World War II through the Reagan presidency. It assesses the political, social, and economic institutions of America in the dynamic context of relations with the Soviet Union. While the course deals primarily with domestic America, cadets will gain an appreciation for the close relationship between events at home and abroad. Department of History
HI398 SOCIETY & CULTURE IN AMER HIST 3 HI398 examines the evolution of American society from the perspective of the family and evaluates the influence of group identification--class, race, gender, and ethnicity. Other topics include consumerism, sports, religion, and wars as factors that modify and enrich the social and cultural spectrum. Department of History
HI498 COLLOQUIUM IN HISTORY 3 The colloquium employs seminar discussions of important books and scholarly articles to enhance understanding of major historical issues. Subcourses are designed to provide in-depth study of various topics in American, European, military, and international and strategic history. Cadets select a subcourse topic as the basis for their reading program after consultation with their faculty advisor or departmental counselor. Subcourse topics may vary each year in accordance with student interest and faculty expertise. The colloquium satisfies the 400-level course requirement for the history fields of study. Cadets who major in history should complete a colloquium that will support their subsequent enrollment in HI499, Senior Thesis in History. Department of History
HI499 SENIOR THESIS 3 The course provides cadets selecting the major in history with an opportunity to enhance their skills in historical research and analysis. For this reason the course serves as excellent preparation for graduate study in history and related disciplines. Based upon their background and research interests cadets are organized into small thesis-writing seminars. Under the supervision of a seminar advisor, each cadet defines a topic, develops a research plan, accomplishes research, and drafts a thesis. The seminar meets occasionally to discuss issues in historiography and methodology, review progress in research, and critique draft papers. At the end of the semester cadets present their findings and defend their theses before a committee of faculty and fellow students. Department of History
IS450 PRINCIPLES OF DIS APP ENGR 3 Building on the foundations of algorithm implementation, data representation, web development, and basic networking, this course focuses on the principles of constructing a modern distributed application. Cadets study the principles, construction, and interaction of user interface, network, web server, and database components to produce an effective distributed application. Cadets will learn new tools and skills working as a team to analyze, design, and implement a system that solves a given problem. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
IT105 INTRO TO COMPUTING & INFO TECH 3 Designed to meet the needs of the core curriculum, this fundamental course provides an introduction to the principles behind the use, function, and operation of digital computers and information technology. The course presents program design and construction techniques in moderate detail, with consideration given to principles of software engineering. Cadets will use a PC-based, integrated program development environment and sophisticated application software. Problem solving using the computer as a tool is a central theme throughout the course as cadets will employ a design methodology to solve problems efficiently and logically. Emphasis is placed on learning how to learn and individual discovery. Cadets are introduced to the internet, the use of the World Wide Web, other information technology tools, and information security. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
IT155 ADV INTRO TO COMP & INFO TECH 3 Provides a more advanced study of computers, information technology and programming for cadets who have demonstrated ability beyond the level of the standard course. The course studies advanced microcomputer technology and advanced programming techniques. All graded material is identical to that in IT105. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
IT300 PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS 3 This is the first course for cadets enrolled in the computer science core engineering sequence. This course presents a thought-provoking introduction to key computer science concepts. Cadets develop their understanding of programming (to include modular design) and problem-solving skills begun in IT105, and build a foundation for further computer science studies by focusing on software, data organization, and other topics. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
IT305 THEORY & PRAC OF MIL IT SYS 3 This course builds on the foundations of Information Technology (IT) acquired during the first two years of cadet experiences. It covers problem solving utilizing the digitization process, networking, databases, information systems, information assurance, and the evolving legal and ethical framework surrounding use of IT. Students study several aspects of military and commercial IT infrastructures, as well as the IT concepts and techniques that will facilitate their success as a military officer and inspire life-long learning in the IT domain. Concepts are reinforced through numerous in-class exercises and labs as well as team projects. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
IT382 NETWORK INFRASTRUCT MGT 3 This course covers network infrastructures through all stages of implementation as well as application of networking technology within the Army enterprise. The course integrates fundamental knowledge of network infrastructure by teaching cadets how to design, install, secure and maintain both wired and wireless network infrastructures. In addition, cadets learn how to ensure their network is efficient, robust and expandable. This course focuses on the practical study of network infrastructure, but also introduces cadets to the underlying theories of network communication. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
IT401 IT SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT I 3.5 This course is the first in the senior-level integrative capstone experience. Its purpose is to prepare cadets for a coherent system integration experience. Conceptual material stresses requirements elicitation including aspects of the social, political, economic and ethical dimensions, project planning, and integration of information technologies to meet the needs of the user organization. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
IT460 INFORMATION WARFARE 3 This course addresses the entire spectrum of information warfare from the political, legal, and ethical aspects to the technology and techniques of cyber attack. The Political Science and Computer Science faculty jointly teach this course. The course covers how digitization has changed the world and the national security environment of the United States. Students also learn how attack and defense are conducted in cyberspace through classroom discussion and hands-on exercises in the IWAR Laboratory. The course culminates with a group project in which cadets are given a real scenario and possible U.S. objectives and then develop and brief an information operation plan. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
IT485 SPEC TOPIC IN INFORMATION TECH 3 This course provides in-depth study of a special topic in information technology not offered elsewhere in the USMA curriculum. Course content will be based on the special expertise of the visiting professor or a senior information technology faculty member. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
IT493 IT INDEPENDENT STUDY 3 This elective will be tailored to the specific project and to qualifications of the cadet. The research, study program, or special project will be proposed by the cadet or selected from those proposed by the department. The cadet will formalize a proposal, develop a viable research plan, and conduct project design under the guidance and supervision of a faculty advisor. The Head of the Department will approve cadet projects. Lessons and labs established through consultation between cadet and advisor. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
KN355 FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY 3 A knowledge of basic and applied anatomy is essential to the study of human beings engaged in motor performance. An individual who understands the anatomical bases that underlie human movement and who can systematically analyze movement and determine interventions is more likely to improve technique and reduce the risk of injury. Therefore, this course is designed to introduce the structures of human anatomy and explain how these structures are involved in human movement. On successful completion of the course, cadets should be able to identify and understand the anatomical structures essential for human movement and apply their anatomical knowledge to human movement problems in athletic, educational, clinical, and/or work settings. Department of Physical Education
KN455 PSYCHOLOGY OF EXERCISE 3 This course comprehensively examines theory and research related to exercise psychology, and introduces sport psychology as an associated discipline. The course is designed to provide a broad overview of exercise psychology and increase understanding of how psychological factors influence adherence and performance in exercise and sport. Additionally, the course addresses associated topics including addictive and unhealthy behaviors, burnout and overtraining, aggression in sport, and character development through sport. Department of Physical Education
KN460 EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY 3.5 This course is designed to apply the principles of chemistry, physics, anatomy, and physiology towards an understanding of the impact of work on the human body Study will include both mechanical and physiological response to acute bouts of work and functional adaptation to repeated bouts of work. In support of class room instruction students will be introduced to basic laboratory techniques and collection, analysis and interpretation of physiological data. In addition, material will be presented that will emphasize the influence of age, disease-states, or the environment on the physiological response as a clue to physiological mechanisms and significance. Department of Physical Education
KN470 FITNESS ASSESSMENT AND RX 3 This course is designed to increase theoretical and practical knowledge and understanding of the administrative, medical, and biological aspects of developing physical competency through physical activity and exercise. Students will apply the scientific theories behind exercise assessment and prescription towards developing functional independence across the spectrum of activities for daily living, recreation, sports performance, and prevention and rehabilitation of disease covering various populations across the life span. Department of Physical Education
KN485 TOPICS: EXERCISE/SPORT SCIENCE 3 This course provides in-depth study of a special topic in exercise and sport sciences not offered elsewhere in the USMA curriculum. Course content will be based on the special expertise of the Visiting Professor, Rotating PhD, or a senior DPE faculty member. Department of Physical Education
KN491 INDIV RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY 1 This elective course provides an opportunity for a cadet to conduct an in-depth research project, study program, or special project in exercise and sport science. The cadet will formalize a proposal, develop a viable research plan, and conduct the project under the guidance and supervision of a faculty advisor. The Director - Center for Physical Development Excellence will approve all individual research projects. The course will require a commitment of approximately 40 hours. Department of Physical Education
KN492 INDIV RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY 2 This elective course provides an opportunity for a cadet to conduct an in-depth research project, study program, or special project in exercise and sport science. The cadet will formalize a proposal, develop a viable research plan, and conduct the project under the guidance and supervision of a faculty advisor. The Director - Center for Physical Development Excellence will approve all individual research projects. The course will require a commitment of approximately 80 hours. Department of Physical Education
KN493 INDIV RESEARCH IN KINESIOLOGY 3 This elective course provides an opportunity for a cadet to conduct an in-depth research project, study program, or special project in exercise and sport science. The cadet will formalize a proposal, develop a viable research plan, and conduct the project under the guidance and supervision of a faculty advisor. The Director - Center for Physical Development Excellence will approve all individual research projects. The course will require a commitment of approximately 120 hours. Department of Physical Education
KN494 RESEARCH METHODS/DATA ANALYSIS 3 This course is designed to survey the basic types of analytical, descriptive, and experimental research methods often found in exercise science research to help cadets understand the systematic nature of problem solving. Cadets will also learn to analyze, interpret, and apply exercise science data. Cadets will survey a variety of statistical procedures: descriptive, inferential, and correlational. Emphasis will be given to analyzing and interpreting data from a research perspective. Department of Physical Education
LA203 ARABIC I (STANDARD) 3.5 In the standard course sequence, cadets acquire a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in Arabic. Learning activities focus on situations cadets are likely to encounter in Arabic society. Cadets are taught how to express simple ideas and basic needs, comprehend the language in everyday contexts, and read simplified texts and brief, authentic selections. In addition to speaking, listening and reading skills, cadets also learn how to write sentences, paragraphs and/or short compositions on familiar topics. Through readings and discussions, cadets are introduced to the cultures and history of the Arabic-speaking world. Cadets acquire a command of basic Arabic vocabulary and gain a general understanding of how the language works, and they become able to apply that knowledge when learning other foreign languages. Department of Foreign Languages
LA361 INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I 3 In the intermediate course sequence, cadets develop proficiency in those skills necessary for communicating effectively in Arabic and for pursuing upper-level courses. Cadets develop speaking skills that enable them to engage in conversations on a variety of topics with other class members and with native speakers. Cadets reinforce and expand their language skills by reading, viewing, discussing, and writing about contemporary life, current events, and other cultural and historical topics as presented in selected materials of the Arabic-speaking world. In addition, cadets gain an overview of the profession of arms in Arabic-speaking countries by reading, discussing, and writing about pertinent materials that focus on the mission and history of the military in those countries. Cadets also review the basic rules of Arabic grammar and continue to acquire a corpus of Arabic vocabulary. This course serves as a bridge to advanced elective Arabic courses. Department of Foreign Languages
LA475 ARABIC RDG/WRTG THRU MEDIA 3 In this course cadets enhance their reading and writing skills through study and discussion of contemporary Arabic media (e.g. the Internet, television, film, radio, newspapers and magazines), as well as short literary selections. Reading strategies and textual analysis are addressed. Writing tasks develop organization, substance, and style. Graded work typically includes oral and written summaries of authentic texts and short compositions or reaction papers. The course is conducted in Arabic. Department of Foreign Languages
LA483 ARAB CIVILIZATION I 3 This course and the following one, LA484, constitute an integrated study of the culture, history, and geography of the Arabic-speaking world. Readings, lectures, discussions, and audio-visual materials encompass this civilization's representative artistic and intellectual accomplishments, its present-day political institutions, economy, and popular culture. In addition, the courses focus on the values and attitudes, the customs and traditions, and the social structures of Arabic people. At the same time, cadets continue to develop greater proficiency in Arabic. Graded work may include giving oral presentations, writing short essays or preparing a term paper. A majority of the work is done in Arabic. Department of Foreign Languages
LA485 ARABIC LITERATURE I 3 In this course cadets gain basic competence in the knowledge and comprehension of representative literary works and their relationship to the cultural context of the target society. Selected examples of various literary genres are read, discussed, and analyzed. At the same time, cadets continue to develop greater proficiency in the target language. Video and film presentations supplement readings, where possible. Graded work may include giving oral presentations, writing short essays, or preparing a term paper. A majority of the work is done in the target language. Department of Foreign Languages
LC203 CHINESE I (STANDARD) 3.5 In the standard course sequence, cadets acquire a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in Chinese. Learning activities focus on situations cadets are likely to encounter in Chinese society. Cadets are taught how to express simple ideas and basic needs, comprehend the language in everyday contexts, and read simplified texts and brief, authentic selections. In addition to speaking, listening and reading skills, cadets also learn how to write sentences, paragraphs and/or short compositions on familiar topics. Through readings and discussions, cadets are introduced to the cultures and history of the Chinese-speaking world. Cadets acquire a command of basic Chinese vocabulary and gain a general understanding of how the language works, and they become able to apply that knowledge when learning other foreign languages. Department of Foreign Languages
LC361 INTERMEDIATE CHINESE I 3 In the intermediate course sequence, cadets develop proficiency in those skills necessary for communicating effectively in Chinese and for pursuing upper-level courses. Cadets develop speaking skills that enable them to engage in conversations on a variety of topics with other class members and with native speakers. Cadets reinforce and expand their language skills by reading, viewing, discussing, and writing about contemporary life, current events, and other cultural and historical topics as presented in selected materials of the Chinese-speaking world. In addition, cadets gain an overview of the profession of arms in Chinese-speaking countries by reading, discussing, and writing about pertinent materials that focus on the mission and history of the military in those countries. Cadets also review the basic rules of Chinese grammar and continue to acquire a corpus of Chinese vocabulary. This course serves as a bridge to advanced elective Chinese courses. Department of Foreign Languages
LC475 CHINESE RDG/WRTG THRU MEDIA 3 In this course cadets enhance their reading and writing skills through study and discussion of contemporary Chinese media (e.g. the Internet, television, film, radio, newspapers and magazines), as well as short literary selections. Reading strategies and textual analysis are addressed. Writing tasks develop organization, substance, and style. Graded work typically includes oral and written summaries of authentic texts and short compositions or reaction papers. The course is conducted in Chinese. Department of Foreign Languages
LC483 CHINESE CIVILIZATION I 3 This course and the following one, LC484, constitute an integrated study of the culture, history, and geography of the Chinese-speaking world. Readings, lectures, discussions, and audio-visual materials encompass this civilization's representative artistic and intellectual accomplishments, its present-day political institutions, economy, and popular culture. In addition, the courses focus on the values and attitudes, the customs and traditions, and the social structures of Chinese-speaking people. At the same time, cadets continue to develop greater language proficiency. Graded work may include giving oral presentations, writing short essays or preparing a term paper. A majority of the work is done in Chinese. Department of Foreign Languages
LC485 CHINESE LITERATURE I 3 In this course cadets gain basic competence in the knowledge and comprehension of representative literary works and their relationship to the cultural context of the target society. Selected examples of various literary genres are read, discussed, and analyzed. At the same time, cadets continue to develop greater proficiency in the target language. Video and film presentations supplement readings, where possible. Graded work may include giving oral presentations, writing short essays, or preparing a term paper. A majority of the work is done in the target language. Department of Foreign Languages
LE101 ACDMC RDG/WRTG INTL CDTS I 3.5 This course seeks to solidify language proficiency of non-native English speakers within the cognitively rigorous demands of a military-academic environment. While essentially a writing course, significant rhetorical, oratorical, and analytical skills are developed through extensive reading and systematic analysis of culturally relevant texts to guide cadets past surface impressions of American culture into successive layers of complexity. Concurrently, research and documentation skills are stressed to develop positive control over linguistic and professional conventions expected of cadets in subsequent core English requirements. Department of Foreign Languages
LF203 FRENCH I (STANDARD) 3.5 In the standard course sequence, cadets acquire a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in French. Learning activities focus on situations cadets are likely to encounter in French society. Cadets are taught how to express simple ideas and basic needs, comprehend the language in everyday contexts, and read simplified texts and brief, authentic selections. In addition to speaking, listening and reading skills, cadets also learn how to write sentences, paragraphs and/or short compositions on familiar topics. Through readings and discussions, cadets are introduced to the cultures and history of the French-speaking world. Cadets acquire a command of basic French vocabulary and gain a general understanding of how the language works, and they become able to apply that knowledge when learning other foreign languages. Department of Foreign Languages
LF361 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I 3 In the intermediate course sequence, cadets develop proficiency in those skills necessary for communicating effectively in French and for pursuing upper-level courses. Cadets develop speaking skills that enable them to engage in conversations on a variety of topics with other class members and with native speakers. Cadets reinforce and expand their language skills by reading, viewing, discussing, and writing about contemporary life, current events, and other cultural and historical topics as presented in selected materials of the French-speaking world. In addition, cadets gain an overview of the profession of arms in French-speaking countries by reading, discussing, and writing about pertinent materials that focus on the mission and history of the military in those countries. Cadets also review the basic rules of French grammar and continue to acquire a corpus of French vocabulary. This course serves as a bridge to advanced elective French courses. Department of Foreign Languages
LF475 FRENCH RDG/WRTG THRU MEDIA 3 In this course cadets enhance their reading and writing skills through study and discussion of contemporary French media (e.g. the Internet, television, film, radio, newspapers and magazines), as well as short literary selections. Reading strategies and textual analysis are addressed. Writing tasks develop organization, substance, and style. Graded work typically includes oral and written summaries of authentic texts and short compositions or reaction papers. The course is conducted in French. Department of Foreign Languages
LF483 FRENCH CIVILIZATION I 3 This course constitutes an integrated study of the culture, history, and geography of France from its beginnings to the end of World War II. Readings, lectures, discussions, and audio-visual materials encompass this civilization's representative artistic and intellectual accomplishments, its present-day political institutions, economy, and popular culture. In addition, the course focuses on the values and attitudes, the customs and traditions, and the social structures of the people of France. At the same time, cadets continue to develop greater language proficiency. Graded work may include giving oral presentations, writing short essays, or preparing a term paper. A majority of the work is done in French. Department of Foreign Languages
LF485 SURVEY OF FRENCH LIT I 3 This course is a survey of French literature tracing its development from the Middle Ages through the 18th century. Cadets gain basic competence in the knowledge and comprehension of representative literary works and their relationship to the cultural context of French society. Selected examples of various literary genres are read, discussed, and analyzed. At the same time, cadets continue to develop greater proficiency in French. Video and film presentations supplement readings, where possible. Graded work may include giving oral presentations, writing short essays, or preparing a term paper. A majority of the work is done in French. Department of Foreign Languages
LG203 GERMAN I (STANDARD) 3.5 In the standard course sequence, cadets acquire a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in German. Learning activities focus on situations cadets are likely to encounter in German society. Cadets are taught how to express simple ideas and basic needs, comprehend the language in everyday contexts, and read simplified texts and brief, authentic selections. In addition to speaking, listening and reading skills, cadets also learn how to write sentences, paragraphs and/or short compositions on familiar topics. Through readings and discussions, cadets are introduced to the cultures and history of the German-speaking world. Cadets acquire a command of basic German vocabulary and gain a general understanding of how the language works, and they become able to apply that knowledge when learning other foreign languages. Department of Foreign Languages
LG361 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I 3 In the intermediate course sequence, cadets develop proficiency in those skills necessary for communicating effectively in German and for pursuing upper-level courses. Cadets develop speaking skills that enable them to engage in conversations on a variety of topics with other class members and with native speakers. Cadets reinforce and expand their language skills by reading, viewing, discussing, and writing about contemporary life, current events, and other cultural and historical topics as presented in selected materials of the German-speaking world. In addition, cadets gain an overview of the profession of arms in German-speaking countries by reading, discussing, and writing about pertinent materials that focus on the mission and history of the military in those countries. Cadets also review the basic rules of German grammar and continue to acquire a corpus of German vocabulary. This course serves as a bridge to advanced elective German courses. Department of Foreign Languages
LG475 GERMAN RDG/WRTG THRU MEDIA 3 In this course cadets enhance their reading and writing skills through study and discussion of contemporary German media (e.g. the Internet, television, film, radio, newspapers and magazines), as well as short literary selections. Reading strategies and textual analysis are addressed. Writing tasks develop organization, substance, and style. Graded work typically includes oral and written summaries of authentic texts and short compositions or reaction papers. The course is conducted in German. Department of Foreign Languages
LG483 GERMAN CIVILIZATION I 3 This course constitutes an integrated study of the culture, history, and geography of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland from their beginnings to the end of World War II. Readings, lectures, discussions, and audio and visual materials encompass this civilization's representative artistic and intellectual accomplishments, its present-day political institutions, economy, and popular culture. In addition, the course focuses on the values and attitudes, the customs and traditions, and the social structures of the people of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. At the same time, cadets continue to develop greater language proficiency. Graded work may include giving oral presentations, writing short essays, or preparing a term paper. A majority of the work is done in German. Department of Foreign Languages
LG485 SURVEY OF GERMAN LIT I 3 This course is a survey of German literature tracing its development from the 19th century through post-World War II. Cadets gain basic competence in the knowledge and comprehension of representative literary works and their relationship to the cultural context of German society. Selected examples of various literary genres are read, discussed, and analyzed. At the same time, cadets continue to develop greater language proficiency. Video and film presentations supplement readings, where possible. Graded work may include giving oral presentations, writing short essays, or preparing a term paper. A majority of the work is done in German. Department of Foreign Languages
LN380 NATURE OF MODERN LANGUAGES 3 Cadets learn that human language is a rule-based and universal system. They examine languages like those taught at USMA from the perspective of linguists, teachers and Army officers. Topics include the origin of and the basis for language, the nature of grammar, language sounds, the phenomenon of meaning, and how language attains communication. Knowledge gained is frequently interdisciplinary and relevant to courses offered at USMA in psychology, communication, English and foreign or second languages. Graded work may include giving oral presentations and completing a term project or paper. Department of Foreign Languages
LN487 ADV IND STUDY-FOREIGN LANGS 3 LN487 and LN488 are essentially honors or tutorial courses available only to exceptionally motivated and qualified cadets who have exhausted all other language-specific courses and who wish to pursue a special field of interest in language, linguistics or a language-related field. The minimum completion requirement is a term paper, based on individual research of a length and on a topic upon which instructor and cadet have agreed. Department of Foreign Languages
LN491 SEM ABROAD: ADV LANG & CULT I 3 Cadets attend a military academy or an undergraduate institution abroad and enroll in courses that enhance their language proficiency and cultural literacy. Courses may focus on language acquisition, literature, military science, history or the social sciences. If appropriate, cadets participate in military development activities. They attend lectures and seminars and complete all course requirements. The course grade becomes part of their Academic Summary. Department of Foreign Languages
LN492 SEM ABROAD: ADV LANG & CULT II 3 Cadets attend a military academy or an undergraduate institution abroad and enroll in courses that enhance their language proficiency and cultural literacy. Courses may focus on language acquisition, literature, military science, history or the social sciences. If appropriate, cadets participate in military development activities. They attend lectures and seminars and complete all course requirements. The course grade becomes part of their Academic Summary. Department of Foreign Languages
LN493 SEM ABROAD: ADV LANG&CULT III 3 Cadets attend a military academy or an undergraduate institution abroad and enroll in courses that enhance their language proficiency and cultural literacy. Courses may focus on language acquisition, literature, military science, history or the social sciences. If appropriate, cadets participate in military development activities. They attend lectures and seminars and complete all course requirements. The course grade becomes part of their Academic Summary. Department of Foreign Languages
LN494 SEM ABROAD: ADV LANG & CULT IV 3 Cadets attend a military academy or an undergraduate institution abroad and enroll in courses that enhance their language proficiency and cultural literacy. Courses may focus on language acquisition, literature, military science, history or the social sciences. If appropriate, cadets participate in military development activities. They attend lectures and seminars and complete all course requirements. The course grade becomes part of their Academic Summary. Department of Foreign Languages
LN495 SEM ABROAD: ADV LANG & CULT V 3 Cadets attend a military academy or an undergraduate institution abroad and enroll in courses that enhance their language proficiency and cultural literacy. Courses may focus on language acquisition, literature, military science, history or the social sciences. If appropriate, cadets participate in military development activities. They attend lectures and seminars and complete all course requirements. The course grade becomes part of their Academic Summary. Department of Foreign Languages
LP203 PORTUGUESE I (STANDARD) 3.5 In the standard course sequence, cadets acquire a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in Portuguese. Learning activities focus on situations cadets are likely to encounter in Portuguese society. Cadets are taught how to express simple ideas and basic needs, comprehend the language in everyday contexts, and read simplified texts and brief, authentic selections. In addition to speaking, listening and reading skills, cadets also learn how to write sentences, paragraphs and/or short compositions on familiar topics. Through readings and discussions, cadets are introduced to the cultures and history of the Portuguese-speaking world. Cadets acquire a command of basic Portuguese vocabulary and gain a general understanding of how the language works, and they become able to apply that knowledge when learning other foreign languages. Department of Foreign Languages
LP361 INTERMEDIATE PORTUGUESE I 3 In the intermediate course sequence, cadets develop proficiency in those skills necessary for communicating effectively in Portuguese and for pursuing upper-level courses. Cadets develop speaking skills that enable them to engage in conversations on a variety of topics with other class members and with native speakers. Cadets reinforce and expand their language skills by reading, viewing, discussing, and writing about contemporary life, current events, and other cultural and historical topics as presented in selected materials of the Portuguese-speaking world. In addition, cadets gain an overview of the profession of arms in Portuguese-speaking countries by reading, discussing, and writing about pertinent materials that focus on the mission and history of the military in those countries. Cadets also review the basic rules of Portuguese grammar and continue to acquire a corpus of Portuguese vocabulary. This course serves as a bridge to advanced elective Portuguese courses. Department of Foreign Languages
LP475 PORTUGUESE RDG/WRTG THRU MEDIA 3 In this course cadets enhance their reading and writing skills through study and discussion of contemporary Portuguese media (e.g. the Internet, television, film, radio, newspapers and magazines), as well as short literary selections. Reading strategies and textual analysis are addressed. Writing tasks develop organization, substance, and style. Graded work typically includes oral and written summaries of authentic texts and short compositions or reaction papers. The course is conducted in Portuguese. Department of Foreign Languages
LP481 SHORT STORY IN PORTUGUESE 3 In this course cadets gain basic competence in the knowledge and comprehension of representative Brazilian and Portuguese short stories and of their relationship to the cultural contexts of Brazilian and Portuguese society. At the same time, cadets continue to develop greater language proficiency. Graded work may include giving oral presentations, writing short essays, or preparing a term paper. A majority of the work is done in Portuguese. Department of Foreign Languages
LR203 RUSSIAN I (STANDARD) 3.5 In the standard course sequence, cadets acquire a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in Russian. Learning activities focus on situations cadets are likely to encounter in Russian society. Cadets are taught how to express simple ideas and basic needs, comprehend the language in everyday contexts, and read simplified texts and brief, authentic selections. In addition to speaking, listening and reading skills, cadets also learn how to write sentences, paragraphs and/or short compositions on familiar topics. Through readings and discussions, cadets are introduced to the cultures and history of the Russian-speaking world. Cadets acquire a command of basic Russian vocabulary and gain a general understanding of how the language works, and they become able to apply that knowledge when learning other foreign languages. Department of Foreign Languages
LR361 INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I 3 In the intermediate course sequence, cadets develop proficiency in those skills necessary for communicating effectively in Russian and for pursuing upper-level courses. Cadets develop speaking skills that enable them to engage in conversations on a variety of topics with other class members and with native speakers. Cadets reinforce and expand their language skills by reading, viewing, discussing, and writing about contemporary life, current events, and other cultural and historical topics as presented in selected materials of the Russian-speaking world. In addition, cadets gain an overview of the profession of arms in Russian-speaking countries by reading, discussing, and writing about pertinent materials that focus on the mission and history of the military in those countries. Cadets also review the basic rules of Russian grammar and continue to acquire a corpus of Russian vocabulary. This course serves as a bridge to advanced elective Russian courses. Department of Foreign Languages
LR475 RUSSIAN RDG/WRTG THRU MEDIA 3 In this course cadets enhance their reading and writing skills through study and discussion of contemporary Russian media (e.g. the Internet, television, film, radio, newspapers and magazines), as well as short literary selections. Reading strategies and textual analysis are addressed. Writing tasks develop organization, substance, and style. Graded work typically includes oral and written summaries of authentic texts and short compositions or reaction papers. The course is conducted in Russian. Department of Foreign Languages
LR483 RUSSIAN CIV I 3 This course constitutes an integrated study of the culture, history, and geography of Russia and the Soviet Union from its beginnings to the end of World War II. Readings, lectures, discussions, and audio-visual materials encompass this civilization's representative artistic and intellectual accomplishments, its political institutions, economy, and popular culture. In addition, the course focuses on the values and attitudes, the customs and traditions, and the social structures in Russia. At the same time, cadets continue to develop greater language proficiency. Graded work may include giving oral presentations, writing short essays, or preparing a term paper. A majority of the work is done in Russian. Department of Foreign Languages
LR485 SURVEY OF RUSSIAN LITERATURE I 3 This course is a survey of Russian literature, tracing its development from the early 19th century to the beginning of WWI. Cadets gain basic competence in the knowledge and comprehension of representative literary works and their relationship to the cultural context of Russian society. Selected examples of various literary genres are read, discussed, and analyzed. At the same time, cadets continue to develop greater language proficiency. Video and film presentations supplement readings, where possible. Graded work may include giving oral presentations, writing short essays, or preparing a term paper. A majority of the work is done in Russian. Department of Foreign Languages
LS203 SPANISH I (STANDARD) 3.5 In the standard course sequence, cadets acquire a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in Spanish. Learning activities focus on situations cadets are likely to encounter in Spanish society. Cadets are taught how to express simple ideas and basic needs, comprehend the language in everyday contexts, and read simplified texts and brief, authentic selections. In addition to speaking, listening and reading skills, cadets also learn how to write sentences, paragraphs and/or short compositions on familiar topics. Through readings and discussions, cadets are introduced to the cultures and history of the Hispanic world. Cadets acquire a command of basic Arabic vocabulary and gain a general understanding of how the language works, and they become able to apply that knowledge when learning other foreign languages. Department of Foreign Languages
LS361 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I 3 In the intermediate course sequence, cadets develop proficiency in those skills necessary for communicating effectively in Spanish and for pursuing upper-level courses. Cadets develop speaking skills that enable them to engage in conversations on a variety of topics with other class members and with native speakers. Cadets reinforce and expand their language skills by reading, viewing, discussing, and writing about contemporary life, current events, and other cultural and historical topics as presented in selected materials of the Hispanic world. In addition, cadets gain an overview of the profession of arms in Spanish-speaking countries by reading, discussing, and writing about pertinent materials that focus on the mission and history of the military in those countries. Cadets also review the basic rules of Spanish grammar and continue to acquire a corpus of Spanish vocabulary. This course serves as a bridge to advanced elective Spanish courses. Department of Foreign Languages
LS475 SPANISH RDG/WRTG THRU MEDIA 3 In this course cadets enhance their reading and writing skills through study and discussion of contemporary Spanish media (e.g. the Internet, television, film, radio, newspapers and magazines), as well as short literary selections. Reading strategies and textual analysis are addressed. Writing tasks develop organization, substance, and style. Graded work typically includes oral and written summaries of authentic texts and short compositions or reaction papers. The course is conducted in Spanish. Department of Foreign Languages
LS483 SPANISH CIV AND CULTURE 3 This course constitutes an integrated study of the culture, history, and geography of Spain. Readings, lectures, discussions, and audio-visual materials encompass spain's representative artistic and intellectual accomplishments, its present-day political institutions, economy, and popular culture. In addition, the course focuses on the values and attitudes, the customs and traditions, and the social structures of the Spanish people. At the same time, cadets continue to develop greater language proficiency. Graded work may include giving oral presentations, writing short essays, or preparing a term paper. The work is done in Spanish. Department of Foreign Languages
LS485 SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE 3 In this course cadets gain basic competence in the knowledge and comprehension of representative literary works and their relationship to the Spanish-American cultural context. Selected examples of various literary genres are read and discussed, and analyzed. At the same time, cadets continue to develop greater language proficiency. Video and film presentations supplement readings, where possible. Graded work may include giving oral presentations, writing short essays, or preparing a term paper. The work is done in Spanish. Department of Foreign Languages
LW310 INTRO TO LEGAL METHOD 3 This course provides an introduction to the study of jurisprudence and, thereby, an intellectual foundation for legal studies. Jurisprudence explores the theory and philosophy of law, its relations to morality, and its limits. The intent of the course is to provide cadets a platform on which to examine the nature of law, legal reasoning, and legal institutions. Topics covered include positivism and natural law theory, theories of criminal justice, concepts of liberty, responsibility, and human rights. Cadets also will learn the fundamentals of legal research and writing. Department of Law
LW403 CONSTITUTIONAL/MILITARY LAW 3.5 This course studies the United States Constitution and the Military Justice System. Cadets will acquire information and skills in order to recognize and resolve constitutional and legal problems. The course provides analytical models for dealing with problems regarding societal and military order. Finally, the course seeks to enable the cadet to make an intelligent commitment to the values and preferences embodied in the Constitution and our system of military and civilian law. Examples from military law are used to model fundamental principles examined in the course. Significant court decisions are explored to support the course goals. Specific substantive areas include: separation of powers, judicial review, war powers, equal protection, privacy, individual rights, searches and inspections, military justice processes, and military criminal law. Department of Law
LW410 COMPARATIVE LEGAL SYSTEMS 3 This course uses a comparative approach to study the three major legal systems of the world: the English common law system, the civil law system (and its branches) of continental Europe, and the Islamic legal system. These three systems are the foundation for the laws and legal systems of most of the world today, including Latin America, Africa, the Middle East and east Asia. Similarities and differences between these systems and the American legal system are explored. Social, political, and economic factors which distinguish these systems and more recently have begun to integrate them are covered. Emphasis is placed on the sources of law, the procedures for resolving legal disputes, and basic principles of civil and criminal justice. Department of Law
LW472 CRIMINAL LAW 3 This course will examine the legal, social, religious, cultural, and political motivations that justice systems use to characterize certain actions as “criminal.” The course will revolve around the traditional reasons for criminal law, namely blameworthiness and punishment, and also examine how institutions use criminal law to serve their narrow interests. This course will introduce theories surrounding criminal law and illustrate how cadets may apply law immediately in their roles as officers. The course will examine federal and state criminal codes and also the Uniform Code of Military Justice. From a legal perspective based on the U.S. Constitution and other criminal codes, some of the topics covered include the death penalty, insanity, corporate crime, conspiracy, murder, necessity, and self-defense. Department of Law
LW474 LAW OF ARMED CONFLICT 3 This course is designed to develop in each student an understanding of basic law of armed conflict (LOAC), with an emphasis on issues that might arise on the battlefield at a tactical level. The ethical and historical background of LOAC will be examined, including Geneva Conventions and protocols, and how LOAC is enforced on international and national levels, to include prosecution under the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Illustrative examples will include the Nuremberg Tribunal, My Lai, and the Gulf War. The emphasis is on the LOAC responsibilities of the junior officer. Department of Law
LW475 ADV CONSTITUTIONAL LAW SEM 3 This seminar course covers a broad range of traditional and contemporary constitutional law topics. In addition to studying U.S. Supreme Court cases in particular areas of constitutional law, cadets are given an opportunity to study the historical foundations of the U.S. Constitution and underlying theories and principles of constitutionalism. The seminar format demands active participation in classroom debate, role playing, and critical thinking about complex issues of law and policy. As part of the seminar curriculum, each cadet will assume the role of a Supreme Court Justice. In this role, the cadet will study a real case pending before the Supreme Court and will write an abbreviated opinion reflecting the cadet's decision based on principled reasoning. The seminar typically travels to the Supreme Court to hear argument in the studied case as part of the opinion writing exercise. Department of Law
LW481 INTERNATIONAL LAW 3 The field of international law is one of the most dynamic areas of the law, and its principles are often applied in addressing the complex security problems facing our nation. This course will familiarize cadets with the body of rules and expectations which govern the rights and obligations of states and international organizations, during both times of peace and conflict. In particular, this course will emphasize the aspects of international law that are relevant to the operational and tactical problems that officers will confront as they deploy overseas. This course will integrate some themes from other courses in the Department of Law and reinforce some fundamental principles officers will confront as they seek to understand the relationship between law, diplomacy, and military operations. Department of Law
LW482 NATIONAL SECURITY LAW 3 This seminar examines the legal framework for national security decisions. Cadets will analyze the delicate balance of liberty and security that must exist to preserve a democratic society. Particular areas include: constitutional separation of powers and shared responsibility for national security; the legality and scope of war and other uses of armed force short of war; access to and protection of sensitive information; intelligence collection and clandestine activities; the role of the media, responses to terrorism and international organized crime; and the formulation of national security policy and law. Department of Law
LW488 BUSINESS LAW 3 This course introduces cadets to the basics of business and commercial law. Contractual principles under the common law and Uniform Commercial Code are emphasized. Current legal issues in the following areas are explored: consumer protection; real, personal, and intellectual property law; antitrust law; and employment discrimination. Included is a survey of the basic principles of government contracting law. Additionally, cadets engage in business negotiations exercises. This course employs both case study and problem-solving methods of instruction. Department of Law
LW490 SPECIAL TOPICS IN THE LAW 3 An in-depth seminar course concentrating on a single area of the law. The course is conducted by the Department's Visiting Professor or a Law faculty member when the visiting professor is unavailable. Department of Law
LW498 THESIS I: PROPOSAL & RESEARCH 3 The purpose of the Senior Thesis is to provide cadets with the opportunity to create a project that is academically, professionally, and personally meaningful to them and that reflects their thinking and abilities as developed at West Point and in the Department of Law. Through the scholarly project that results from this course, cadets will be expected to show how they and their work have progressed and that their work is of professional quality. Cadets will choose a faculty advisor with whom they will work over two semesters. In collaboration with the faculty advisor, cadets will explore their chosen areas of law with a goal of producing a project, usually a thirty page paper that is of professional quality. This paper will be completed during LW499. Cadets will meet individually with their advisors on a regular basis to discuss the law, progress on the thesis, and developmental issues. Department of Law
LZ203 PERSIAN I (STANDARD) 3.5 In the standard course sequence, cadets acquire a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in Persian. Learning activities focus on situations cadets are likely to encounter in Persian society. Cadets are taught how to express simple ideas and basic needs, comprehend the language in everyday contexts, and read simplified texts and brief, authentic selections. In addition to speaking, listening and reading skills, cadets also learn how to write sentences, paragraphs and/or short compositions on familiar topics. Through readings and discussions, cadets are introduced to the cultures and history of the Persian-speaking world. Cadets acquire a command of basic Persian vocabulary and gain a general understanding of how the language works, and they become able to apply that knowledge when learning other foreign languages. Department of Foreign Languages
LZ361 INTERMEDIATE PERSIAN I 3 In the intermediate course sequence, cadets develop proficiency in those skills necessary for communicating effectively in Persian and for pursuing upper-level courses. Cadets develop speaking skills that enable them to engage in conversations on a variety of topics with other class members and with native speakers. Cadets reinforce and expand their language skills by reading, viewing, discussing, and writing about contemporary life, current events, and other cultural and historical topics as presented in selected materials of the Persian-speaking world. In addition, cadets gain an overview of the profession of arms in Persian-speaking regions by reading, discussing, and writing about pertinent materials that focus on the mission and history of the military in those countries. Cadets also review the basic rules of Persian grammar and continue to acquire a corpus of Persian vocabulary. This course serves as a bridge to advanced elective Persian courses. Department of Foreign Languages
MA100 PRECALCULUS MATHEMATICS 3 MA100 prepares cadets with background deficiencies in algebra and trigonometry for the core mathematics program. The course develops fundamental skills in algebra, trigonometry, and functions, through an introduction to mathematical modeling and problem solving. Since this course does not count toward graduation requirements; cadets enrolled in MA100 will forfeit an elective opportunity. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA103 MATH MODELING/INTRO CALCULUS 4 MA103 is the first course of the mathematics core curriculum, and it emphasizes applied mathematics through modeling - using effective problem solving strategies and modeling theory to solve complex and often ill-defined problems. The course exercises mathematical concepts while nurturing creativity, critical thinking, and learning through activities performed in disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and multidisciplinary settings. Special emphasis is placed on introducing calculus using continuous and discrete mathematics through applied settings. The course exploits a variety of technological tools to develop numerical, graphical, and analytical solutions that enhance understanding. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA104 CALCULUS I 4.5 This is the second semester of the mathematics core curriculum. This course and Calculus II, the third semester of the mathematics core curriculum, provide a foundation for the continued study of mathematics and for the subsequent study of the physical sciences, the social sciences, and engineering. Combined coverage includes single and multi-variable differential calculus, single and multi-variable integral calculus, and differential equations. Throughout both courses mathematical models motivate the study of topics such as optimization, accumulation, change in one and several variables, differential equations, motion in space, and other topics from the natural sciences, the social sciences, and the decision sciences. MA104 covers single and multi-variable differential calculus including 3-dimensional geometry and vectors. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA153 ADV MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS 4.5 This is the first course of a two-semester advanced mathematics sequence for selected cadets who have validated single variable calculus and demonstrated strength in the mathematical sciences. It is designed to provide a foundation for the continued study of mathematics, sciences, and engineering. This course consists of an advanced coverage of topics in multivariable calculus. Topics may include a study of infinite sequences and series, vectors and geometry of space, vector functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. An understanding of course material is enhanced through the use of a computer algebra system. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA205 CALCULUS II 4.5 This is the third semester of the mathematics core curriculum. This course with Calculus I, the second semester of the mathematics core curriculum, provides a foundation for the continued study of mathematics and for the subsequent study of the physical sciences, the social sciences, and engineering. Combined coverage includes single and multi-variable differential calculus, single and multi-variable integral calculus, and differential equations. Throughout both courses mathematical models motivate the study of topics such as optimization, accumulation, change in one and several variables, differential equations, motion in space, and other topics from the natural sciences, the social sciences, and the decision sciences. MA205 covers single and multi-variable integral calculus and elementary ordinary differential equations. The sequence culminates with an introduction to the mathematics most applicable to each cadet’s major or engineering stem. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA206 PROBABILITY & STATISTICS 3 This is the final course in the mathematics core curriculum. It provides a professional development experience upon which cadets can structure their reasoning under conditions of uncertainty and presents fundamental probability and statistical concepts that support the USMA core curriculum. Coverage includes data analysis; modeling, probabilistic models, simulation, random variables and their distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, and simple linear regression. Applied problems motivate concepts, and technology enhances understanding, problem solving, and communication. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA255 MATH MODELING/INTRO DIF EQ 4 This is the second course of a two-semester advanced mathematics sequence for selected cadets who have validated single variable calculus and demonstrated strength in the mathematical sciences. It is designed to provide a foundation for the continued study of mathematics, sciences, and engineering. This course emphasizes the interaction between mathematics and the physical sciences through modeling with differential equations. Topics may include a study of first order differential equations, first order difference equations, second order linear equations, partial differential equations and Fourier series, systems of first order linear equations, numerical methods, and nonlinear equations and stability. An understanding of course material is enhanced through the use of a computer algebra system. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA364 ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS 3 This course provides additional mathematical techniques and deepens the understanding of concepts in mathematics to support continued study in science and engineering. Emphasis is placed upon using mathematics to gain insight into natural and man-made phenomena that give rise to problems in differential equations and vector calculus. Calculus topics focus on three-dimensional space curves, vector fields and operations, divergence and curl, line and surface integrals. Analytic and numerical solutions to differential equations and systems of differential equations are found using a variety of techniques. Linear algebra topics include solutions to homogeneous and non-homogeneous systems of equations. An introduction to classical partial differential equations is included in the Spring semester. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA371 LINEAR ALGEBRA 3 This course emphasizes both the computational and theoretical aspects of linear algebra one encounters in many subjects ranging from economics to engineering. The course covers solutions of linear systems of equations and the algebra of matrices. The foundational aspects of vector spaces and linear transformations to include linear dependence and independence, subspaces, bases and dimension, inner products, and orthonormalization are developed. This is rounded out with a detailed investigation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors as they relate to diagonalization, quadratic equations, and systems of differential equations. The Invertible Matrix Theorem is explored as the conceptual/theoretical thread of the course. A computer algebra system is used to explore concepts and compute solutions to problems. Applications of the course material are included in the form of special problems to illustrate its wide scope. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA372 INTRODUCTION TO DISCRETE MATH 3 The purpose of this course is to introduce topics in Discrete Mathematics, providing a foundation for further study and application. The topics covered are useful to both the applied mathematician and the computer scientist. They include propositional logic, elements of set theory, combinatorics, relations, functions, partitions, methods of proof, induction and recursion, digraphs, trees, finite state machines, and algebraic systems. Specific applications to computer science are presented. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA376 APPLIED STATISTICS 3 This course builds on the foundations presented in the core probability and statistics course to provide a broad introduction to some of the most common models and techniques in applied statistics. The mathematical basis for each of the models and techniques is presented with particular emphasis on the development of the required test statistics and their distributions. Topics covered include hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, categorical data analysis, regression analysis, and nonparametric methods. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA381 NONLINEAR OPTIMIZATION 3 This course provides an undergraduate presentation of nonlinear topics in mathematical programming that builds on multivariable Calculus II. The emphasis of this course is on developing a conceptual understanding of the fundamental topics introduced. These topics include general convexity, convex functions, derivative-based multivariable search techniques, minima and maxima of convex functions, gradients, hessian matrices, Lagrange Multipliers, Fritz-John and Kuhn-Tucker optimality conditions, and constrained and unconstrained optimization. Computer software is used to explore and expose various key ideas throughout the course. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA383 FOUNDATIONS OF MATH 3 This course introduces the student to the methods and language of upper division mathematics. It presents formal set theory, and introduces the student to the methods of formulating and writing mathematical proofs. Finally, it provides the student a rigorous introduction to the theory of relations, functions, and infinite sets. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA386 INTRO TO NUMERICAL ANALYSIS 3 This course develops an understanding of the methods for solving mathematical problems using a digital computer. Algorithms leading to solution of mathematical problems will be examined for consistency, stability, and convergence. After a brief review of calculus theory, a study of error analysis and computer arithmetic will provide the framework for the study of the following topics: solutions of equations of one variable, solutions of linear and nonlinear systems of equations, the use of polynomials to approximate discrete data, curve fitting, numerical integration and differentiation, and the approximation of continuous functions. Special problems will incorporate computer graphics and the use of mathematical software libraries to produce numerical solutions of applied problems. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA391 MATHEMATICAL MODELING 3 This course is designed to give cadets the opportunity to develop skills in model construction and model analysis while addressing interesting scenarios with practical applications from a wide variety of fields. This course serves as the entry point for both the Mathematical Sciences major and the Operations Research major. The course addresses the complex process of translating real-world events into mathematical language, solving the resulting mathematical model (iterating as necessary), and interpreting the results in terms of real world issues. Topics include model development from data, regression, general curve fitting strategies, and deterministic and stochastic model development. Interdisciplinary projects based on actual modeling scenarios are used to integrate the various topics into a coherent theme. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA461 GRAPH THEORY AND NETWORKS 3 This course introduces the student to the techniques, algorithms, and structures used in graph theory and network flows in order to solve real world discrete optimization problems. Basic definitions relating to graphs and digraphs, together with a large number of examples and applications are provided. Cadets learn to implement new graph theory techniques in their area of study. Emphasis is on modeling, algorithms, and optimization. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA484 PARTIAL DIFF EQUATIONS 3 The course is devoted to the solution of the classical partial differential equations of mathematical physics and most engineering fields. For example, these equations describe such diverse phenomena as the flow of heat in a metal plate, the gravitational field of the solar system, the vibration of a structural beam, and the energy levels of the hydrogen atom. The subject matter has application in many fields and should be of interest to mathematics, science, and engineering concentrators. Specific topics covered are the heat, wave, and potential equations, Fourier series, series solutions to ordinary differential equations, special functions, and boundary value problems. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA487 MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS II 3 Continuation of MA387. Course coverage includes Riemann and Stieltjes integration, infinite series, sequences and series of functions, uniform convergence, and power series. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA488A SPECIAL TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS 3 This course provides an in-depth study of a special topic in mathematics not offered elsewhere in the USMA curriculum. Course content will be based on the special expertise of the visiting professor or a senior mathematical science faculty member. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA489 ADV INDIV STUDY IN MATH 3 This is essentially a tutorial course or an individual project, offered only to a limited number of highly qualified cadets who have completed available mathematics elective courses and have expressed a wish to pursue advanced study in a field of mathematics. The course work will be tailored to suit the individual needs. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA491 RESEARCH SEMNR-APPLD MATH 3 The student integrates the mathematical concepts and techniques learned in previous courses with the principles developed throughout the whole USMA Curriculum to solve a current problem of interest to the individual, to the Academy, or to agencies in the Department of the Army. Cadets may select problems from a list of suitable projects provided by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. Cadets choose a faculty advisor who has an interest and background in the problem. Cadets may work individually or in small teams, depending on the nature of the research. Regular workshop sessions will be held. Cadets will be given an opportunity to present their research at the Service Academies Student Mathematics Conference and/or other undergraduate conferences. Research reports will be reviewed, edited, and compiled into the USMA Transactions on Cadet Mathematical Research. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA493D INTRODUCTION TO TOPOLOGY 3 The course begins with cardinality and the modern definition of a function. Then the basic properties of topological spaces--compactness, connectedness, and continuity--will be emphasized. Special attention will be given to metric topologies on Euclidean spaces. Complete metric spaces and function spaces will be introduced. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MA498 SR THESIS I: RSCRCH & PROPOSAL 3 The purpose of the Senior Thesis is to provide cadets with an unique opportunity to create a scholarly product that is academically, professionally, and personally meaningful to them and that reflects their thinking and abilities as developed at West Point and in the Department of Mathematical Sciences. Cadets will choose a faculty advisor with whom they will collaborate over two semesters. Cadets will meet on a regular basis with their advisor to discuss mathematics, progress on their research and thesis, and developmental issues. The objectives of the research are: (1) to synthesize and cohere the cadet's studies; (2) to apply methodological skills of research design, conceptual reasoning, analysis, and research gained to a selected area of substantive interest; (3) to extend the cadet's in-depth study of the selected area of interest beyond the level obtained in the Mathematical Sciences Major; (4) to design and conduct focused research beyond the constrained opportunities in elective courses; and (5) to develop cadet skills in conceptual reasoning, critical analysis, and effective writing. Department of Mathematical Sciences
MC300 FUND OF ENGR MECH AND DESIGN 3 The engineering design process and the method of design are introduced. Principles of equilibrium are used to analyze forces on statically determinate rigid bodies and structures to include trusses and frames. The behavior of deformable bodies under axial, flexural, and torsional loading is examined. The concepts of stress, strain, and material properties are introduced and are used to relate external forces applied to a body to the resulting internal forces and deformations so that performance can be evaluated. Practical applications involving the design and adequacy of mechanical and structural elements under various loading conditions are emphasized. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
MC306 DYNAMICS 3 Dynamics examines the motion of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies under the influence of forces. It focuses on the use of Newtonýs Second Law, in three major, progressive blocks of instructionýfrom scalar, then vector, treatments of rectilinear and curvilinear motion of single particles; through vector motion of systems of particles; to general three-dimensional motion of rigid bodies. The course also provides brief introductions to energy methods: work-energy and impulse-momentum. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
MC311 THERMAL-FLUID SYSTEMS I 3.5 Thermal-Fluid Systems I is an integrated study of fundamental topics in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics. The course introduces conservation principles for mass, energy, and linear momentum as well as the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics. Principles are applied to incompressible flow in pipes and turbomachinery, external flows, power generation systems, refrigeration cycles, and total air-conditioning focusing on the control volume approach. Laboratory exercises are integrated into classroom work. This course includes completion of a comprehensive, out-of-class design problem. This design problem provides the opportunity for students to apply engineering science and the engineering design process to a hands-on project. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
MC364 MECHANICS OF MATERIALS 3.5 This course studies the behavior of a variety of materials under normal, shear, torsional, bending and combined loads. The concepts of stress, strain, creep, corrosion, fatigue and material properties are explored. The course examines observed behavior in light of the relationships between the microscopic structure and macroscopic properties of materials used in engineering applications. The loading, geometry, functional environment and material properties of machine or structural parts are used to relate the forces applied to a body to the resulting internal forces and deformations so that performance can be evaluated. Practical applications involving the design and adequacy of mechanical and structural elements under various loading and environmental conditions are emphasized. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
MC380 ENGINEERING MATERIALS 3.5 Course explores the relationship between the microscopic structure and macroscopic properties of materials used in engineering applications. The origin of mechanical and physical properties is studied. Emphasized is an understanding of the fundamental aspects of atomic and microstructural concepts for proper materials selection and enhancement of engineering properties. Materials under study are metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, nano-sized/structured materials, biomaterials, smart materials, and semi- and super-conductors. Laboratory exercises are incorporated throughout the course to provide practical experience in making decisions concerning material composition and processing in order to optimize engineering properties. Experiences from the field are detailed to demonstrate application of concepts. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
MC478 STRUCTURAL MECHANICS 3 The course extends the coverage of Mechanics of Materials to the analysis of elements commonly found in civil and mechanical engineering applications. Topics include stress/strain transformation, Mohrýs circle, Generalized Hookeýs Law, failure theory, fatigue and fracture mechanics and the basic theory of elasticity in three dimensions. Also covered in varying depth are the numerical methods of finite element analysis, and the experimental methods of electrical resistance strain gages and photoelasticity. Students investigate the combined effects of axial, torsion, flexural, and shear loads on members with complex geometries and cross sections. Coverage includes the generalized flexure theory and shear center, torsion of non-circular cross-sections, and thick-walled cylinders. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
ME350 INTRO THERMAL SYS W/ ARMY APPL 3 This course is presented within the framework of a common model for the engineering design process. This model serves as a conceptual framework for study in the engineering thermal sciences. This course concerns the study of mediums and energy. The basic conservation laws are developed. The student will gain a basic engineering knowledge of thermal science applications in the Army. Emphasis is placed on practical applications of internal combustion and gas turbine engines and fluid flow. Laboratory exercises are integrated into classroom work. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
ME370 COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN 3 Explores the use of computer methods as an aid to solving engineering problems. Computer techniques are studied in a variety of engineering contexts. Topics include 3D solid modeling, engineering analysis, engineering computer programming, and graphical presentation of information. Students learn to apply a variety of engineering-related programs or routines. Students write, document, and use programs of their own in design scenarios. Considerable emphasis is placed on use of the computer as a tool in the engineering design process. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
ME404 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN 3 This course introduces mechanical engineering design as an iterative decision making process. It also introduces engineering economics and ethics. One engineering design problem reinforces the design process instruction and culminates in a student competition. Cadets begin an integrative capstone design experience that applies the Mechanical Engineering Design Process to a real-world engineering problem addressing social, political, economic, and technical issues. Students begin capstone assignments early in the course and continue their projects with ME496. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
ME450 ME DESIGN OF ARMY SYSTEMS 3 This course presents mechanical engineering design as an iterative decision making process. A wide variety of mathematics, science, and engineering fundamentals are applied to the synthesis, analysis, and evaluation of mechanical components. The culminating design project provides an opportunity to experience design and to consider reliability, economics, and the judicious use of resources. A paper design and design and build projects reinforce the design process instruction. The course culminates in a student competition. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
ME480 HEAT TRANSFER 3.5 The three modes of heat transfer, conduction, convection, and radiation, are studied in detail and applications are made to various engineering systems. The principles of conduction and convection are used to study the mechanisms of heat transfer during boiling, condensation and the design of heat exchangers. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
ME481 AIRCRAFT PERFOR/STAT STBLTY 3 The course applies the principles developed in applied aerodynamics to develop the equations of motion for a rigid aircraft in steady state level flight, maneuvering flight, and during takeoff and landing. These equations are analyzed to determine such performance characteristics as maximum range, endurance, turning rate, climb rate, etc. Piston-prop, turbo-prop, and jet aircraft are considered. The equations of motion are then analyzed to develop static stability criteria and investigate steady state control characteristics. Two flight laboratories in the departments fixed-wing airplanes provide an opportunity to obtain performance data and analyze the steady state stability and control of an actual aircraft. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
ME489 ADV STUDY IN MECH ENGRNG 3 The cadet pursues advanced study of a topic in mechanical engineering on an individual or small group basis, independent of a formal classroom setting. Similar to graduate level research, the scope of the selected project is tailored to the interests of the cadet based on resources and in consultation with a faculty advisor. To develop research skills, the cadet is integral in all phases of project completion by defining objectives, studying fundamentals and background material, outlining the approach, conducting analysis, and communicating results. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
ME492 PWR TRAINS & VEH DYNAMICS 3 An introductory course in ground vehicle theory with emphasis on analysis, testing, and evaluation of automotive power trains and dynamic systems to understand the underlying principles affecting vehicle design. Clutches, transmissions (manual and automatic), differentials, wheels and tires, as well as braking, steering and suspension systems are studied in detail to include their effect on vehicular or other system performance. High speed, tracked vehicle application of the above systems is also covered. Theory is verified with hands on experience in the laboratory. Component design problems are interspersed throughout the course. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
MG379 LEADING TEAMS 3 This course is designed to improve cadets' understanding of human behavior in small group/team settings. Course content includes structural characteristics of teams such as size, status, roles and norms in addition to the effects of task and environment. Cadets then use their understanding of these constructs to analyze team phenomena such as cohesion, performance, decision making, problem solving and conflict resolution. We also devote a number of lessons to current issues such as electronic and virtual groups, high performance work teams and shared leadership in a team environment. The course is particularly relevant to professional development in that cadets gain a comprehensive understanding of the dynamics of small group and team interaction. This allows them to develop and implement creative leader actions that will maximize unit/team effectiveness. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
MG381 INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT 3 This course serves a dual purpose. It is an introduction to the concept of management as well as an introduction to the multidisciplinary nature of the management field of study. This course focuses on the managerial activities that organizational leaders use to effectively and efficiently direct the resources of organizations. As a result, the course is structured around the primary concepts of planning and decision-making, organizing, leading and controlling. In addition, cadets will examine the concepts of ethical and global management as they learn to analyze operating environments, assess organizational capabilities and develop feasible courses of action. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
MG382 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 3 This course begins with the premise that people are a firm’s most important resource; and that the management of this critical resource ultimately determines the success or failure of the organization. The course examines the behavioral science principles used to foster the creation of effective work environments -- environments specifically designed to elicit motivation, commitment, productivity and satisfaction. The course gives special attention to how human resource management (HRM) practices can give a firm a Competitive Advantage by using High Performance Work Systems, tending to Stakeholders' needs (customers, employees, stockholders, and the community) and through strategic Globalization. By analyzing HRM practices in terms of these three critical organizational outcomes, students learn how to apply HRM concepts to positively influence the success of the organization. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
MG410 MANAGERIAL FINANCE 3 The purpose of MG410 is to provide Management Majors with the basic principles of managerial finance, and then to apply these principles in the context of managerial decision-making. Specifically, this course will cover: the fundamentals of the time value of money; the meaning and measurement of risk and return; valuation techniques for stocks and bonds; and standard techniques for financial analysis, to include capital budgeting, discounted cash flow valuation, and weighted average cost of capital. Cadets will leave this course with a solid understanding of how financial managers at the corporate level balance risk and return, and thus manage everyday financial decision-making. This course is required for all management majors. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
MG420 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 3 The purpose of MG420 is to provide cadets with the tools to deal with the quantitative aspects of design and analysis of operations management. Emphasis is on identification, analysis, and solution of production problems using applied quantitative techniques using the case study technique. In addition to case studies, simulations reinforce the problem-solving techniques necessary for today's successful managers. Specific methods and techniques taught and applied are operations strategy, product design and selection, supply chain management, total quality management, forecasting, capacity planning, facility location, facility layout, work system design, inventory management, material requirements planning, and scheduling. This course is required for cadets pursuing the Management major. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
MS200 FUNDAMENTALS: ARMY OPERATIONS 1.5 This course introduces cadets to the small unit leader's role in the Army by developing the critical thinking and problem-solving skills necessary for adaptive leaders in administrative, training, and tactical environments. Fundamentals of Army Operations builds upon the knowledge and experience cadets gain in MS100 and summer training. It explores Army leadership, troop leading procedures, and small-unit operations in order to develop and hone decision-making skills. Throughout the course, cadets demonstrate their knowledge through a series of tactical decision exercises. Cadets who successfully complete MS200 possess fundamental tactical planning and decision-making skills that prepare them for more challenging training in the field and in future military science courses. Department of Military Instruction
MS300 PLATOON OPERATIONS 1.5 This course builds upon basic tactical planning and decision-making skills taught during MS200. MS300 further develops the cadet's knowledge of doctrinal and war-fighting principles, general professional knowledge, and Troop Leading Procedures (TLPs) in order to instill an aggressive and flexible combined arms mentality. Cadets are challenged to apply knowledge, skills and common sense to solve complex situations that require critical thinking and creative problem-solving skills. Instruction in the fundamentals of Army Operations emphasizes both offensive and defensive tactics. Additionally, cadets are expected to demonstrate an increased understanding of the TLPs and mental agility through nearly daily execution of tactical decision-making exercises. In addition to tactics, cadets continue their general instruction in the various Army systems, procedures and functions that are important aspects of officership. Finally, cadets examine the small unit leader's role in ensuring that the moral and ethical decision making process is integrated into all operations. Department of Military Instruction
MX400 OFFICERSHIP 2 MX 400 is a capstone course that challenges cadets to reflect upon, integrate, and synthesize their experiences in the six Cadet Leader Development System domains as they commence the transformation to commissioned officership. Cadets will achieve a thorough intellectual understanding of the four clusters of expert knowledge of the military professional--military-technical, moral-ethical, political-cultural, and human development. Successful completion of this course will enable each cadet to achieve competence and confidence in a new self-identity in the four facets of the role of a commissioned officer--a Soldier, a leader of character, a servant of the Nation, and a member of the profession of arms. Each graduate will be capable of executing the fundamental practices of the military professional--the repetitive exercise of discretionary judgment in decision making and taking actions that fulfill the moral and legal responsibilities of commissioned officers. Upon graduation, each new 2LT will be fully prepared for the immediate challenges of junior officership and capable of a lifetime of professional growth as an officer in the United States Army. Department of Military Instruction
NE300 FUNDAMENTALS OF NUCLEAR ENGR 3 This course provides the student with an understanding of the fundamental physical principles involved in radioactive decay, radiation interaction with matter, nuclear fission and the nuclear fuel cycle. The course covers neutron interactions with matter, fission, neutron diffusion, neutron moderation, and reactor criticality. This course is essential for the nuclear engineer and is an excellent choice for the applied scientist. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
NE350 RADIOLOGICAL ENGR DESIGN 3 This course focuses on nuclear engineering systems including radiation protection, shielding, and the uses of radioactive sources in industrial processes. Specific topics emphasize the operation of radiation detectors, shielding principles, health effects of radiation, radiological dispersion devices, and nuclear incidents. A design project applies the concepts presented in this course to the solution of practical problems. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
NE389 INDIVIDUAL STUDY IN NE 1.5 This course is an individually supervised research and study program to familiarize cadets with advanced nuclear or radiological engineering procedures and techniques. The primary purpose is to acquaint students with the essential skills required for independent research in nuclear or radiological engineering. With the approval of the Head of the Department, the cadet chooses a research project of interest and is supervised by a faculty member conducting the research. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
NE450 NUCLEAR WEAPONS EFFECTS 3 This course focuses on the operation of nuclear and fusion weapons, and the effects of a nuclear weapon detonation. Specific topics emphasize blast effects, thermal radiation, initial radiation and fallout, electromagnetic pulse, biological effects of radiation, and the policy issues associated with weapons of mass destruction. Extension problems with design components apply the concepts presented in NE450 to the solution of practical problems. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
NE452 INSTRUMENTATION AND SHIELDING 3.5 This course focuses on nuclear instrumentation and radiation detectors, and on biological and material radiation protection through shielding. Specific topics include a study of radiation, and radiation detection devices to include: ionization chambers, proportional counters, Geiger-Mueller counters, scintillation detectors, semiconductor diode detectors, germanium and sodium iodide gamma-ray detectors, and neutron detectors. Radiation shielding, as a force protection measure, includes the design, analysis, and confirmation of radiation shields using point kernel and removal diffusion methods. Emphasis is placed on practical application of the radiation detection instruments and the associated acquisition software. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
NE489 ADV IND STDY NUCLEAR ENGNRG 3 This course is an individually supervised research and study program to familiarize students with advanced nuclear or radiological engineering procedures and techniques. The primary purpose is to acquaint students with the essential features of independent research in nuclear or radiological engineering. With the approval of the Head of the Department, the cadet chooses a research project currently in progress in the Department and is supervised by a faculty member conducting the research. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
NE495 ADV NUC SYSTEM DESIGN PROJ I 3.5 This is the first course in a two-semester capstone design experience. The course provides experience in the integration of math, science, and engineering principles into a comprehensive nuclear system design project. The design project emphasizes a multidisciplinary approach to total system design providing multiple paths to a number of feasible and acceptable solutions which meet the stated performance requirements. Design teams are required to develop product specifications, generate alternatives, make practical engineering approximations, and perform appropriate analysis to support the technical feasibility of the design, make decisions leading to an optimal system design, and brief their interim results during in-process reviews (IPRs). Topics such as engineering economics and the Code of Federal Regulations are introduced. Computational codes such as MCNP and other nuclear industry codes specific to the project will be introduced. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
PE100 PHYS ED FOUNDATIONS-MEN 3   Department of Physical Education
PE107 FOUNDATIONS OF MOVEMENT 0.5 This introductory movement and fitness course is designed to improve a cadet's upper body strength, hip flexor strength, and core body stabilization and to prepare him or her for success in PE 117 (Military Movement). The class focuses on developing the specific strength and skills needed to pass PE 117 (Military Movement) and the Indoor Obstacle Course Test. Department of Physical Education
PE109 FUNDAMENTALS OF AQUATICS 0.5 This course has two phases: phase one is a remedial swimming exploration curriculum designed to prepare cadets classified as non-swimmers for the survival swimming curriculum. The remedial phase is designed to help cadets acquire in-water experiences, and gradually refine the basic motor skills needed to be comfortable, safe, and effective in and around the aquatic environment. Phase two emphasizes the military applications of swimming and survival skills to include the elements of breath control, buoyancy positions, stroke assessment, and swimming endurance. Successful completion fulfills the survival swimming graduation requirement for selected cadets. Department of Physical Education
PE115 FUNDAMENTALS OF COMBATIVES 0.5 This course provides the Cadets with a comprehensive set of basic combative skills applicable to all soldiers and is particularly geared for use in a combat scenario. Cadets will learn how to engage in the free movement range, clinch range, and grappling range. Cadets will learn how to strike with their hands, elbows, knees, feet, and heads. A graduated approach to responding appropriately to aggression will be stressed. Cadets will learn how to close with the enemy in order to establish the clinch. The course will cover simple and realistic ground techniques that specifically focus on positional theory. Body mechanics, aggressiveness, and fear management will be stressed as the female soldier is likely to be outweighed by their enemy. In this course the Cadets are evaluated by a two part mid-term and a two part final exam. Cadets are evaluated according to their use of functional technique, ability to manage their fear, and their ability to dominate their opponent(s). Department of Physical Education
PE116 BOXING 0.5 A course in which the offensive and defensive skills of amateur boxing are taught. Course content includes stances, movement, basic punches (i.e. jab, cross, hook, and upper cut), defenses, strategies, and tactics. Instruction on refereeing, judging, and serving as a corner second are presented. Boxers are evaluated, assessed and provided feedback on their ability to box. The course exposes participants to the coping strategies necessary to deal with a physical threat. Department of Physical Education
PE117 MILITARY MOVEMENT 0.5 This is a 19-lesson course designed to expose cadets to a variety of basic movement skills. The course serves as a basis for many other athletic and military activities that cadets will encounter during their time at USMA as well as in their Army career. Focus is placed on applied movement tasks for all cadets. This course takes a basic Movement Theme approach, meaning cadets are required to learn a variety of relevant skills from within the general themes of rolling, hanging, climbing, crawling, jumping, vaulting, landing, mounting, supporting and swinging. In addition, the environment (or apparatus) where a skill is performed is changed or modified to challenge the cadet and broaden the movement experience. Movement environments are designed around specific events such as tumbling, vaulting, vertical ropes, horizontal ropes, the indoor obstacle course (IOCT), horizontal bars, elephant vault, ankles to the bar (ATB), pull-ups, rock climbing, and trampoline. Department of Physical Education
PE215 FUNDAMENTALS/PERSONAL FITNESS 1.5 This course provides cadets with the knowledge and experience to develop a personal fitness plan that links to the Army doctrinal approach to physical readiness. Cadets will participate in a variety of active learning experiences designed to develop, monitor, maintain, and assess physical fitness for their future Army careers and lifetime of physical activity. Department of Physical Education
PE220 AEROBIC FITNESS 0.5 The Aerobic Fitness course (PE220) provides cadets with information and experience to create and conduct physical training in numerous fitness activities including those listed as alternate APFT events in FM 21-20. Cadets will participate in a variety of activities including running, cycling, swimming and mountain biking. The principles of exercise physiology taught in PE 311 Fitness Leader II, are applied throughout the course as students design and participate in various aerobic conditioning assessment activities. Multiple activities will be combined into one event in order to introduce cadets to multi-sport training and competition. Successful completion of the course results in registration with USA Triathlon as a "Registered Triathlon Leader" in preparation for certification as a Level 1 coach. Grading for the course is based upon performance, participation, a written logbook and a final examination. Department of Physical Education
PE223 BASKETBALL 0.5 This course is designed to provide cadets with the skills and knowledge necessary for playing, coaching, and officiating basketball. It is intended to assist students in developing fundamental skills for playing as well as nurturing an appreciation for basketball as a lifetime sport. A variety of offensive and defensive team strategies are taught. In addition, the leadership skills of coaching and officiating basketball will be learned. Grading for the course is based upon an officiating practical exercise, demonstrated individual skills, performance on the James Naismith Basketball Obstacle Course, instructor's assessment of each cadet's game performance and a written term end exam. Department of Physical Education
PE224 ADVANCED CLOSE QUARTERS COMBAT 0.5 This course is designed to educate and expose Cadets in the realm of edge weapons and impact weapons. Cadets learn realistic offensive tactics, defensive tactics, weapon movement patterns, and footwork in order to engage an enemy who has an edge weapon or impact weapon or to use an edge weapon or impact weapon on the enemy in a hostile situation. The cadets are evaluated on their functional ability to perform the skill learned in the course and also on their ability to show tactful aggression and fear management. Department of Physical Education
PE226 COMBAT GRAPPLING 0.5 This course is designed to provide the cadets with realistic grappling applications and ground fighting skills to enhance their knowledge and warrior ethos to prepare them as future soldiers for unarmed combat and CQC situations. This course focuses on five different grappling positions: top mount, guard, cross side, rear mount, and scarf hold. Cadets learn how to maintain the positions, escape from the positions, submit from the positions, and strike from the positions. Cadets are evaluated in their function ability to perform skill-sets learned in class, and are also evaluated in their ability to manage their fear, keep their composure, and dominate their opponent. Department of Physical Education
PE228 MODERN ARMY COMBATIVES L1 CERT 0.5 PE 228 is designed to certify cadets to teach U.S. Army Level I Combative Skills. Cadets develop a foundation of basic combative grappling skills and an aggressive mind set needed to engage and defeat an enemy in Close Quarters Combat (CQC). The course focuses on 15 basic grappling skills. Cadets are evaluated on their demonstration and knowledge of the required skills. Successful completion of the course qualifies the individual to conduct Skill Level I Combatives training for soldiers. Department of Physical Education
PE230 CYCLING 0.5 This course is designed to take the novice road cyclist and mountain biker through a progressive program of training and instruction. The course introduces students to basic riding skills as well as bike maintenance. The grading in this course includes daily participation, demonstration of basic riding skills in a road bike technique course and mountain bike challenge and two maintenance skills tests. Department of Physical Education
PE232 EMERGENCY WATER SAFETY 0.5 The purpose of this course is to introduce cadets who are already proficient swimmers, to first responder training in methodologies generic to Water Rescue, CPR, and Emergency First Aid. Cadets are exposed to a variety of distress and drowning scenarios, and will be able to demonstrate strategies and site specific response techniques essential to safely performing a water related assist and/or rescue. Course focus is on military application in both still water and theatre specific environments, with a special emphasis on emergency management protocol. Written evaluation, five skill-specific performance components, and successful completion of two comprehensive exit scenarios are required for successful course completion. Department of Physical Education
PE234 LIFEGUARDING 0.5 This course focuses on a holistic approach to the duties and responsibilities of a trained professional lifeguard and exposes cadets to key elements and strategies related to accident prevention, surveillance methodology, and performance. Additional content and activities focus on emergency response, search and rescue, and duty specific incident/accident management. Cadets who successfully complete certification requirements may obtain professional accreditation/licensure in Lifeguarding, CPR/PR, Oxygen Administration, and Automated External Defibrillation (AED). Additional accreditation/licensure may also be available in both Open Water and Water park Lifeguarding. Written evaluation, four skill-specific performance evaluations, and successful completion of three comprehensive exit scenarios are required for successful course completion. Department of Physical Education
PE236 GROUP EXERCISE LEADERSHIP 0.5 Using music as the controlling factor, this course will give participants an opportunity to experience different modalities of exercise such as high/low impact, step, kickboxing, circuit training, spinning, yoga/pilates and water exercise in a group exercise setting. Participants will be assessed on knowledge of applicable fitness principles, exercise safety, and lesson construction and a team-teaching experience of oneýs choice. Department of Physical Education
PE238 GOLF 0.5 This course is designed to provide the beginner and novice golfer with the skills, knowledge, and techniques needed to play golf. The basic techniques taught are the full swing, pitching, chipping, and putting. Course grading is based upon a series of skill tests, a written examination, and a golf swing analysis. Department of Physical Education
PE242 ICE SKATING 0.5 This course is designed to provide cadets with little or no previous skating experience with the basic skills necessary to safely participate as a recreational ice-skater. It is designed for cadets with little or no previous skating experience. The forward and backward stroke, snow plow, "T" stop, and hockey stops, and as well as forward and backward crossovers are presented. Grading is based upon the cadet's ability to demonstrate the skills taught during the course. A compulsory skating routine is also used for evaluating student proficiency in skills taught during the course. Additionally, a short creative routine of optional figures chosen by the cadet is evaluated. Department of Physical Education
PE244 JUDO 0.5 The purpose of this course is to introduce judo as a competitive sport and the application of judo skills for self defense and combatives training. The course content will include falling skills and basic throwing, pinning, and submission skills. Judo customs, courtesies, terminology, and competitive rules will be introduced. Students will gain an entry level knowledge and understanding of the basic skills, safety concerns, and rules needed to participate in competitive Judo. Students will be graded on a demonstration of basic skills and knowledge of competitive rules and terminology. Department of Physical Education
PE246 RAQUETBALL 0.5 This course introduces the basic skill and strategy fundamentals of racquetball. Cadets learn to identify and demonstrate the basic fundamentals of: personal playing safety; rules of play; forehand and backhand stroke techniques; kill, passing, and defensive shots; serve, serve return techniques and strategies. Singles play, doubles and ýcut throatý are examined. Grading is determined by performance on two skills tests (rally & ceiling shot), and a written final exam. Department of Physical Education
PE248 INDOOR ROCK CLIMBING 0.5 This course develops fundamental rock climbing skills, techniques and safety awareness. This course introduces basic rock climbing systems, rappelling, belaying, knots, top roping, and assorted climbing skills. Course grading is based on climbing skills, rappelling skills, knowledge of basic rock climbing systems, and the application of judgment and safety practices in various situations. Department of Physical Education
PE250 SCUBA 0.5 This course is designed to provide cadets with the basic skills and knowledge needed to safely participate in SCUBA diving and pursue certification as a National Association of Underwater Instructors (NAUI) Basic SCUBA Diver. Successful completion of this course leads to Confined Water Certification and the ability to enroll in Open Water training. The requirements of this course include the successful demonstration of skin and SCUBA diving skills, the ability to practice and adhere to safe diving activities, and the completion of a comprehensive, written final examination. Cadets who possess Scuba certification or are members of the Cadet Sky Diving Club are ineligible for this course. Department of Physical Education
PE258 SOCCER 0.5 This course is designed to provide cadets with the skills and knowledge necessary for playing soccer. A variety of individual skills and techniques are taught, as well as individual/team offensive and defensive strategies. The value of ýsmall sidedý games are used as building blocks that lead to full 11 aside matches. Grading for the course is based upon a written examination, and tournament play. Department of Physical Education
PE262 STRENGTH DEVELOPMENT 0.5 This course provides cadets with the knowledge and hands-on experience for conducting a variety of resistance training exercises. Cadets develop the critical skills needed for teaching safe and proper resistance training techniques that will benefit both them and their soldiers. Cadets are assessed in the following areas: demonstrated proficiency performing multi-joint strength exercises; Olympic exercises and plyometrics. This course is designed to instill a lifetime desire for continued participation in a resistance-type training programs. Department of Physical Education
PE264 TENNIS 0.5 This course is designed to develop basic tennis skills including the forehand and backhand groundstrokes, serve, and volley. Students also learn the basic rules and etiquette of tennis as well as simple singles and doubles strategies. Grading is based on skills tests, an in-class singles and doubles tournament, an observation of a Corps Squad match, and a written final examination. An optional trip section is offered in the fall to the US Open Tennis Championships in Flushing, NY. Department of Physical Education
PE266 VOLLEYBALL 0.5 This course is designed to teach cadets the fundamentals of volleyball. The individual skills taught are the underhand pass, set, serve, block, and spike. Additionally, the course covers defensive and offensive formations, the transition game, officiating techniques and United States Volleyball Association (USVA) rules. Grading is based upon skill testing on the underhand pass, set and serve, a written test, and a round robin tournament. Department of Physical Education
PE320 SURVIVAL SWIMMING - ELEMENTARY 0.5 The Survival Swimming-Elementary course is designed to develop aquatic proficiency for cadets who swam 150 yards in 4 minutes or more on their initial entry swim classification test. The Program of Instruction (POI) is divided into two areas: basic swimming and combat/survival swimming. Emphasis in all levels is on the military applications of swimming and survival skills to include the elements of breath control, buoyancy positions, stroke assessment, and swimming endurance. Grading is primarily based on criterion-referenced scales in basic and survival swimming skills. Department of Physical Education
PE321 SURVIVAL SWIMMING - LOW 0.5 The Survival Swimming-Low Intermediate course is designed to develop aquatic proficiency for cadets who swam 150 yards between 3 minutes 16 seconds and 3 minutes 59 seconds on their initial entry swim classification test. The Program of Instruction (POI) is divided into two areas: basic swimming and combat/survival swimming. Emphasis in all levels is on the military applications of swimming and survival skills to include the elements of breath control, buoyancy positions, stroke assessment, and swimming endurance. Grading is primarily based on criterion-referenced scales in basic and survival swimming skills. Department of Physical Education
PE322 SURVIVAL SWIMMING - HIGH 0.5 The Survival Swimming-High Intermediate course is designed to develop aquatic proficiency for cadets who swam 150 yards between 2 minutes 30 seconds and 3 minute 15 seconds on their initial entry swim classification test. The Program of Instruction (POI) is divided into two areas: basic swimming and combat/survival swimming. Emphasis in all levels is on the military applications of swimming and survival skills to include the elements of breath control, buoyancy positions, stroke assessment, and swimming endurance. Grading is primarily based on criterion-referenced scales in basic and survival swimming skills. Department of Physical Education
PE323 SURVIVAL SWIMMING - ADVANCED 0.5 The Survival Swimming-Advanced course is designed to develop aquatic proficiency for cadets who swam 150 yards in less than 2 minutes 30 seconds on their initial entry swim test. The Program of Instruction (POI) is divided into two areas: basic swimming and combat/survival swimming. Emphasis in all levels is on the military applications of swimming and survival skills to include the elements of breath control, buoyancy positions, stroke assessment, and swimming endurance. Grading is primarily based on criterion-referenced scales in basic and survival swimming skills. Department of Physical Education
PE360 COMBAT APPLICATIONS 0.5 This course provides cadets with a comprehensive set of basic combatives skills suited for a combat scenario. Cadets will learn to respond appropriately to aggression by utilizing proper body mechanics, skills, aggressiveness, and fear management. Two combat ranges of hand-to-hand fighting are taught: 1) Grappling range - cadets learn to fight and win on the ground and, 2) Clinch range - cadets learn to close the distance and control the fight between themselves and an attacker. Cadets will be evaluated on their ability to perform selected combative skills and their capacity to exhibit the warrior ethos and fear management. Department of Physical Education
PE450 ARMY FITNESS DEVELOPMENT 1.5 This course prepares future company grade officers for their roles as fitness leaders by equipping them with the knowledge to plan, implement, and assess unit physical training in a variety of conditions and by giving them opportunities to apply this knowledge. Department of Physical Education
PH201 PHYSICS I 3.5 This is the first course of a two-semester, calculus-based physics sequence. This course consists of an introduction to nuclear physics and a comprehensive study of classical mechanics, which is designed to promote scientific literacy and to develop the use of scientific modes of thought to solve complex problems. Topics include a survey of nuclear physics and a detailed study of the laws of motion, conservation of energy, and conservation of momentum. An integrated laboratory program illustrates basic scientific techniques and serves to stimulate intellectual curiosity. The core physics program is designed to demonstrate the relevance of physics to military technology and to help prepare future Army leaders to anticipate and adapt to technological change. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
PH202 PHYSICS II 3.5 This is the second course of a two-semester, calculus-based physics sequence. It consists of a comprehensive study of electromagnetism and optics designed to promote scientific literacy and to develop the use of scientific modes of thought to solve complex problems. Topics include a detailed study of electrostatics, magnetism, circuits, geometric optics, and wave optics. An integrated laboratory program illustrates basic scientific techniques and serves to stimulate intellectual curiosity. The core physics program is designed to demonstrate the relevance of physics to military technology and to help prepare future Army leaders to anticipate and adapt to technological change. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
PH251 ADVANCED PHYSICS I 3.5 This is the first course of a two-semester, calculus-based advanced physics sequence for selected cadets with demonstrated strengths in mathematics and science. This course consists of an introduction to nuclear physics and a comprehensive study of classical mechanics, which is designed to promote scientific literacy and to develop the use of scientific modes of thought to solve complex problems. Topics include a survey of nuclear physics and a detailed study of the laws of motion, conservation of energy, and conservation of momentum. An integrated laboratory program illustrates basic scientific techniques and serves to stimulate intellectual curiosity. The core physics program is designed to demonstrate the relevance of physics to military technology and to help prepare future Army leaders to anticipate and adapt to technological change. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
PH361 EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS 3.5 This course provides instruction and experimental experiences designed to exercise the student's knowledge of classical and modern physics and to extend his or her familiarity with equipment and techniques used in a physical science laboratory. Cadets, working in groups, execute and report on experimental projects. The program of instruction includes familiarization with electronics and instrumentation, data analysis, and laboratory procedures and practices. Knowledge and skills acquired in this course are essential for subsequent laboratory work in solid state physics, nuclear physics, and optics. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
PH363 MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS 3 This course introduces the physics major to the methods and foundations of mathematical physics. Topics covered include ordinary differential equations, Sturm-Liouville theory, orthogonal functions, the partial differential equations of classical and quantum physics, and integral transforms. Mathematical methods are taught in the context of physical modeling. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
PH365 MODERN PHYSICS 3 This course introduces special relativity and the fundamental concepts of quantum physics with application to atomic physics and nuclear physics in order to prepare cadets for advanced study of science and engineering, especially quantum mechanics, statistical physics, nuclear physics, solid state physics, laser physics, medical radiation physics, and nuclear engineering. This course will also be of interest to any cadet who wishes to gain a deeper appreciation of the natural world or of the technology of the 21st Century. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
PH389 INDIVIDUAL STUDY IN PHYSICS 1.5 This course is an individually supervised research and study program to familiarize cadets with advanced scientific procedures and techniques. The primary purpose is to acquaint students with the essential skills required for independent research in physics. With the approval of the Head of the Department, the cadet chooses a research project of interest and is supervised by a faculty member conducting the research. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
PH456 SCIENCE AND POLICY 3 This course challenges cadets to draw upon their core academic experience to analyze complex policy issues. The relationship and interaction between social, political, economic, and technological dimensions of these issues are explored. Emphasis is given to gaining an understanding of both the power and limitations of science and scientific thinking when confronting problems in the policy arena. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
PH482 ADVANCED CLASSICAL MECHAN 3 This course continues the development of concepts introduced in PH381. Hamiltonian mechanics is explored using the calculus of variations to provide a foundation for connecting classical mechanics, quantum mechanics, and statistical mechanics. The two-body central force problem, the mechanics of rotating systems, and scattering theory are studied in depth. The mathematical techniques associated with cylindrical, spherical, and curvilinear coordinates are introduced, as are the basic principles of nonlinear dynamics and chaos. Cadets will be required to develop and demonstrate the ability to use a computer algebra system to solve advanced problems and plot the solutions. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
PH484 QUANTUM MECHANICS 3 This course begins with a basic introduction to the fundamental postulates of quantum theory. These postulates are then used to develop Heisenberg's uncertainty principle and Schroedinger's equation. Solutions to Schroedinger's equation are sought, first for relatively simple systems such as square wells and harmonic oscillators, and then for the hydrogen atom. The properties of the hydrogen atom are studied in detail. The course also covers approximation methods used for physical systems with small perturbing forces acting on them. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
PH489 ADV INDIV STUDY IN PHYSICS 3 This course is an individually supervised research and study program to familiarize students with advanced scientific procedures and techniques. The primary purpose is to acquaint students with the essential features of independent research in physics. With the approval of the Head of the Department, the cadet chooses a research project currently in progress in the Department, and is supervised by a faculty member conducting the research. Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering
PL100 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 This course develops the ability to apply current psychological principles. Psychology is a broad and expanding discipline and the introductory course is necessarily a survey. The focus of the course is the development of an awareness and understanding of one's own behavior and the behavior of others. Emphasis is placed on applying the behavioral principles learned to the cadets' current lives and their functioning as future officers. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL150 ADVANCED GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 This course is an advanced multidisciplinary study of human behavior and leadership that focuses current psychological principles to the study and understanding of human thoughts, emotions and behaviors. The focus of the course is the enrichment of an awareness and understanding of one's own behavior and the behavior of others. Emphasis is placed on applying the behavioral principles learned to real-world issues and their impacts on functioning as future Army officers. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL300 MILITARY LEADERSHIP 3 This course is a multidisciplinary study of leadership in an organizational context which focuses on the integration of theory and practice. The cadet studies the leader's direct influence on individual motivation and group processes through the application of leadership theories, skills, and attributes. The cadet also learns how to influence subordinates indirectly through organizational systems and procedures, organizational culture, and ethical climate. Cadets apply the knowledge gained in the classroom to their experiences as cadet leaders in the Corps of Cadets. In addition, the course helps each cadet develop usable leadership products in the form of a reflective leadership notebook, which helps the cadet define and inform his or her own personal approach to leading. The cadet will also develop a detailed and theoretically sound leadership philosophy, as well as comprehensive leader plans which have direct application to their roles as leaders in the Corps of Cadets and as future Army officers. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL361 RESEARCH METHODS I 3 This course provides cadets with detailed practical knowledge and skills in the scientific analysis of human behavior. The course content begins with a review of the terms and philosophy of the scientific method as well as basic research concepts. Several research designs, primarily non-experimental methods, provide cadets with a better understanding of research techniques and how they affect the results of a study. Basic methods of data analysis, to include descriptive and inferential statistics, will be covered. Groups of cadets will conduct research projects on a topic of their choice using naturalistic observation. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL373 LIFE CYCLE & HUMAN DEVEL 3 This course focuses on individual development and the forces that influence our development from birth to old age. Cadets will study the various facts, theories, issues, and topics that constitute the field of human development. Cadets will explore human development from various theoretical perspectives. In addition, cadets will discuss such topics as cognitive and moral development, how our self-concept and sense of identity form, and the influence of family and the world around us on development. Special attention will be given to the developmental impact of college. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL376 PERSONALITY & AB PSYCH 3 Building upon the elementary concepts of personality from PL100, this course examines in detail various theoretical frameworks used to study personality and abnormal behavior. The course focuses on four theoretical perspectives: the psychoanalytic, learning, phenomenological, and dispositional perspectives. After examining how the various theoretical perspectives can be used to explain personality, the course applies these perspectives to an understanding of abnormal behavior. Thus, the course focuses on developing the cadets' understanding of "normal" personality development and how and why deviant behavior may result. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL377 SOCIAL INEQUALITY 3 Cadets are introduced to several theoretical perspectives intended to explain the structure of social stratification in the United States. The course examines the state of social inequality in the United States, with a focus on social class, integration, mobility, and equality of opportunity. Cadets explore individual and structural perspectives of social inequality. Cadets evaluate social issues, policies, and programs intended to influence social inequality. Throughout the course, cadets discuss the relevance of class, race, ethnicity, and gender on social opportunity and inequality. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL383 EXPERIMENTAL SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 This course surveys the field of contemporary social psychology. Cadets examine the impact of social structure and group membership on social behavior, while focusing on intrapsychic processes such as attribution, cognition, and learning that underlie social behavior. The course is intended to enable cadets to more effectively analyze and explain human behavior in a given situation. Specific topics include the self, attitudes and attitude change, sex and gender, conformity, obedience, compliance, deviance, helping behavior, aggression, attraction and romance, groups and intergroup relations, and collective behavior. The classroom experience is heavily discussion-oriented in order to maximize the application of social psychological concepts, theories, and perspectives to daily life. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL386 EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 This course provides cadets with detailed practical knowledge and skills in the experimental analysis of behavior and human performance. Particular emphasis is placed on design of laboratory and field experiments, laboratory automation and instrumented data acquisition, computer data analysis, and on the distinction between laboratory research, field test and evaluation. The course includes practical exercises in several content areas of experimental and engineering psychology. These topics are evaluated by laboratory reports. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL387 FOUNDATIONS OF COUNSELING 3 This course introduces cadets to the fundamentals of counseling. It focuses on the practical applications of counseling theories, principles, and techniques. Using the vehicles of videotaping and audiotaping, the course emphasizes personal, performance, career, and disciplinary counseling to help prepare cadets for leadership roles both as a cadet and an officer. The course covers the counseling process and the dynamics of interpersonal relationships within that process. Counseling skills include: basic and advanced communication skills, goal setting, intervention strategies, assertiveness, crisis intervention, and multiculturalism. Examinations are behavioral and written. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL390 BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 This course introduces the cadet to the physiological and anatomical structures and processes that underlie human behavior with emphasis on human performance. The course examines the structure of the nervous and endocrine systems, the mechanisms of seeing and hearing, movement, stress and arousal, learning, memory, biological causes of abnormal behavior, sleep, language, and the effects on performance of damage to neural structures. Cadets are introduced to the scientific examination of real-world bio-psychological problems in laboratory assignments in examining tissue, brains and eyes to provide three-dimensional realism to classroom instruction. This course provides the basis for competence in later engineering psychology electives. Biological Psychology is the "hardware" introduction to engineering psychology. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL393 CRIMINOLOGY-CRIM JUST SYSTM 3 Criminology is the scientific study of the making of laws, the breaking of laws, and the reaction to the breaking of laws. When a crime appears to have been committed and authorities have been notified, the criminal justice system is set in motion. The criminal justice system is the societal response to crime and includes three major activities – law enforcement, the judicial process, and corrections. The course provides an overview of (a) the theories offered to explain crime and delinquent behavior (b) the criminal justice system which responds to those behaviors, and (c) the relationships between the varied explanations of criminal behavior and society’s criminal justice responses to those behaviors. The focus of the course is primarily on the United States, but there is some attention devoted to an international view of crime and criminal justice. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL462 EXPERIMENTAL APP IN PSYCHOLOGY 3 This seminar-based course focuses on the advanced study of topics in psychology. It provides cadets an opportunity for reading and analysis in depth in a topic area of interest and relevance to the study of psychology and its applications. The course employs a seminar approach in which cadets present their own analyses of the discussion topics to the group. By the end of this course, cadets will be able to conduct and evaluate research in the behavioral sciences. This course continues the themes of PL361 (Research Methods I) and introduces cadets to more varied experimental and non-experimental designs and more complex statistical analyses. Groups of cadets will conduct a research project using an experimental method in an area of their choice. Cadets who complete this course will be competent consumers of behavioral sciences research and will be equipped to use the scientific method to investigate and solve many of the problems they will face as military leaders. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL470 TOPICS-BEHAVIOR SCI/LDRSHIP 3 This course explores an advanced topic in Behavioral Sciences and Leadership. Specific subject matter will vary with the expertise of the senior faculty member conducting the course. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL471 LEADERSHIP IN COMBAT 3 PL 471 examines leadership in combat at the tactical level from an interdisciplinary perspective. It first seeks to provide a theoretical foundation for understanding human dimensions of combat, and then explores some of the factors that influence the leadership of soldiers in combat through a collection of readings, film, and first-hand discussions with combat veterans. Cadets examine four case studies and conduct a comparative analysis of two combat leaders. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL475 HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION 3 Computer use in the world today is at an all-time high. Consequently, the need for user-friendly computers is crucial. Somewhat ironically, human capacity for memory has often been explained using the computer metaphor, while the computer designer often attempts to instill human-like qualities into their computer designs. This course focuses on the interface between the human and computer. Initial focus is placed on understanding the theoretical foundations of human processes. The course then examines how these processes interact with computer usage. Students will learn design principles that enhance compatibility with computer systems. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL476 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 In this course, cadets will develop their instructional skills and formulate a conceptual basis for their instructional practices as army officers. The course is oriented toward the study of psychological theories of learning and application of these theories to the design, delivery, and evaluation of adult education and training. The course is subdivided into major areas of study. Learning theory focuses on the study of the learning process with balanced treatment given to behavioristic and cognitive perspectives. Instructional design emphasizes a systems approach to planning and decision making in learning situations. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL479 LEADING ORGNZS THRU CHANGE 3 The environments in which organizations operate are characterized by unprecedented change fueled by rapidly emerging technologies, information overload, changing values, lifestyles and attitudes, and social and civil problems of great magnitude. Effective leaders either must be proactive toward change or be its captive. The purpose of this course is to examine change from an organizational perspective through a complex and diverse mix of theories, concepts, and information. Course concepts are drawn from the disciplines of behavioral science, business, management, and military doctrine. Cadets have the opportunity to analyze the successes, the failures, and the multiple dilemmas of modern organizations in both the private and public sectors in order to better understand the causes, implications, and potential leader actions and strategies associated with organizational change. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL485 HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING 3 This course surveys the theories and methods of human factors engineering (ergonomics). Human factors engineering is concerned with the application of technology and the design of equipment for human use. This course emphasizes the cognitive dimension of human factors engineering. The focus is on understanding the capabilities and limitations of humans as they interact with equipment and facilities. This course lays the foundations for the systematic application of information about humans to the design of equipment and workspace environments. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PL497 SEMINAR IN BEHAVIORAL SCI 3 Cadets develop individual research themes from contemporary behavioral science topics. They are then grouped under a seminar leader for study, discussion, and preparation of their research reports, culminating in a presentation before the seminar group. Cadets will be expected to master both the significant work within the topics of choice and the body of criticisms of the works and to propose a study to advance the body of knowledge. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership
PY201 PHILOSOPHY 3 This course helps third class cadets develop their capacities to think clearly and critically. It acquaints cadets with various viewpoints on major philosophic issues, assists them in acquiring a facility with the language, arguments, and methods of moral discourse, and gives special attention to the subject of war and morality. Department of English and Philosophy
SE300 INTRO TO SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 3 SE300 serves as the "roadmap" course for all cadets taking the three-course Systems Engineering sequence. This course presents the methodological framework and techniques for designing, implementing, managing and reengineering large-scale systems or processes. Cadets learn engineering design and engineering management processes and gain an appreciation for the future environments and systems life-cycles. Cadets analyze case studies and complete practice problems to illustrate mastery of course topics. Cadets also use spreadsheet software for modeling and analyzing design alternatives. Cadets will spend eight to twelve lessons in a computer lab environment. Department of Systems Engineering
SE301 FNDTN ENGIN DSGN & SYS MGMT 3 SE301 serves as the "roadmap" course for all cadets taking the Engineering Management, Information Systems Engineering, Systems Engineering, or Systems Management majors. This course presents the methodological framework and techniques for designing, implementing, managing and reengineering complex systems or processes. Cadets learn engineering design and engineering management processes and gain an appreciation for future environments and system life-cycles. Cadets analyze case studies and complete practice problems to illustrate mastery of course topics. Cadets also use spreadsheet software for modeling and analyzing design alternatives. SE301 introduces a Systems Engineering Management Process while incorporating material from courses in the USMA core curriculum and also previews the modeling and decision making tools that cadets will learn in follow-on Department of Systems Engineering courses. The course is designed to allow cadets the opportunity to learn engineering design and engineering management processes on an individual level so that each cadet will have the experience necessary to succeed in future Systems Engineering courses. Cadets will spend eight to twelve lessons in a computer lab environment. Department of Systems Engineering
SE350 SYSTEMS MODELING AND DESIGN 3 SE350 is the second foundation course of a three-course sequence for non-engineering cadets. It focuses on the application of deterministic and stochastic models to help cadets analyze and understand different alternatives. Cadets learn to apply various modeling techniques that represent and solve real-world problems in the military, government, and industry. SE350 utilizes traditional classroom setting and computer labs, applying the fundamental principles and assumptions of analytical models. Cadets practice uses of spreadsheets to develop and analyze models. A key goal is for cadets to communicate their analysis and recommendations to a decision maker. Ethical responsibilities in describing the results of analyses to decision-makers are integrated throughout the course. Cadets are expected to apply their knowledge of course material in several computer lab exercises throughout the course. Department of Systems Engineering
SE375 STATISTICS FOR ENGINEERS 3 This course is an integral part of the Systems Engineering major that emphasizes both the statistical analyses of data and a statistical methodology important to systems analysis and design. The over-arching course goal is to develop cadets into critical consumers and providers of statistical information as it relates to the techniques, activities, and modeling applications that typify systems engineering concerns.. The course builds on the core probability and statistics course and introduces statistics applications fundamental to the design and analysis of simulations and engineering systems. Specific topics include point and interval estimation, parametric and non-parametric tests of hypotheses, analysis of variance, linear regression, and survey design of experiments, specifically analysis of power and determination of sample size. The course emphasizes the importance of knowing and understanding the assumptions associated with the use of inferential statistics as well as the usefulness of statistical software packages. The basic principles learned in this course will facilitate data analysis in support of Army acquisition and system redesign decision-making. Ethical implications in the analysis and presentation of experimental results, as well as interactions with decision makers, are addressed. Department of Systems Engineering
SE387 DETERMINISTIC MODELS 3 This course is the first of a two-course sequence that emphasizes modeling and analysis of real-world systems. This course focuses on modeling techniques without consideration of uncertainty or probabilistic effects. The course introduces the deterministic modeling process and many of the classical deterministic models used by systems engineers, operations researchers, and management professionals to identify and analyze alternatives as part of the Systems Decision Process (SDP). Emphasis is placed on creative application of the modeling process to include formulation, solution methods, analysis of results, and interpretation. Topics include deterministic life cycle cost modeling, linear programming, sensitivity analysis, networks, transportation models, dynamic programming and integer programming. Cadets will spend several lessons in a computer lab environment. Department of Systems Engineering
SE402 SYSTEMS DESIGN I 3.5 Systems Design I is the first course in a two-semester capstone experience for Systems Engineering and Operations Research majors. SE402 integrates the principles, concepts and models explored in previous core and engineering topic courses. The course applies the principles of systems design, engineering management, and/or reengineering to a real-world system. Cadets work under the supervision of a faculty member to address a problem presented by a real-world client, providing them an integrative experience for their education in engineering design. Department of Systems Engineering
SE450 APPLIED SYS DSGN/DECISN MAKING 3 This course is the third course of the three-course systems engineering sequence. The course serves as the culminating systems engineering experience for non-engineering cadets and integrates the principles, concepts, and models explored in previous courses. Cadets apply the Systems Decision Process to devise technological problem solutions that are effective and adaptable. Cadets work in groups to complete a culminating engineering design experience involving the solution of an incompletely defined problem with no single correct answer. Cadets must consider the economic, political, social and ethical constraints of the system and use creativity to generate potential design alternatives. Cadet groups will use models to analyze the alternative solutions and make a recommendation based on economic analysis and system performance. The course requires assessment of the recommended solution and a written plan for implementation. Department of Systems Engineering
SE485 COMBAT MODELING 3 This course explores the theoretical and practical issues in combat modeling and simulation - the study of combat systems, tactics, and the battlefield environment in conflicts between opposing forces. The course focuses on models and algorithms used in state-of-the-art combat simulations, and techniques for analyzing their effects. Major topics of investigation include functional analysis to support modeling using functional flow diagrams and/or IDEF0 models, combat attrition models, search and detection methods, terrain representation, and measures of effectiveness. Cadets learn to manipulate 3D visual and system characteristic databases to build and test virtual prototypes of new combat system designs. Application of design of experiments and statistical analysis methods assist cadets in assessing the effectiveness of weapons systems, doctrine, and tactics on the future battlefield. The cadet can apply the concepts learned in this course to evaluate potential new Army combat systems, force structures, or doctrinal changes. The techniques taught in this course are a significant part of the Systems Decision Process (SDP) as they encourage creative and independent thought that applies mathematical, physical, and computer sciences to solve future technological problems. Ethical implications in the development and use of combat models also are discussed. Department of Systems Engineering
SE489 AD IND STY IN SYS ENG/ENG MGMT 3 This is a tutorial course in which an individual cadet or a group of cadets study in depth an advanced topic in systems engineering or engineering management under the direct mentorship of a faculty advisor. The scope of the course is tailored to the desires of the cadet(s) in consultation with a faculty advisor. Cadets will coordinate with a faculty mentor who has an interest and background in the research area and who will assist in scoping and developing course content. Communication skills are developed and assessed through both written reports and oral presentations. Department of Systems Engineering
SE491 RSRCH PROJ IN SYS ENG/ENG MGMT 3 The cadet, or cadet team, integrates the concepts and techniques learned in previous Systems Engineering or Engineering Management courses to solve a current problem of interest to the Academy, the Department of the Army, or other agencies in the Department of Defense. Subject to approval from the course and program directors, cadets may select project topics which are follow-on research from their summer AIAD experience, a topic of interest to them, or one that is compatible with on-going research within the Department of Systems Engineering and/or the Operations Research Center of Excellence. Cadets will coordinate with a faculty mentor who has an interest and background in the research area and who will assist in scoping the project and directing the research effort. Cadets may work individually or in small teams, depending on the nature of the research. The course will culminate with a student presentation and a written report. Department of Systems Engineering
SM484 SYSTEM DYNAMICS SIMULATION 3 This course is a simulation elective for the Systems Engineering, Engineering Management, Operations Research, and Systems Management majors. Simulation modeling can be used to study the effects of changes to existing systems or processes, or evaluate the performance of new systems prior to their implementation. The techniques taught in this course are a significant part of the Systems Decision Process (SDP) as they introduce the concept of dynamic systems thinking and analysis. By their nature, large scale systems are dynamic. These systems involve complex cause and effect relationships that form feedback loops between the variables of interest. These systems produce outcomes that are not always intuitive. The cadets use the properties of dynamic systems and analytical techniques to design continuous models of complex systems or processes, implement these models, and perform an analysis of the results. Topics include applications of System Dynamics, client/modeler relationships, problem articulation, functional modeling through causal loop diagrams and stock and flow diagrams, modeling and simulation in a PC-based continuous event simulation package, policy design, policy testing, and policy implementation. These concepts and principles are applied to military and civilian applications such as physical systems, human decision processes, population, and economic/business processes. Cadets develop communication skills by presenting their design results in both written reports and oral presentations. The course also addresses ethical implications in the development and application of dynamic models as well as interactions with decision makers. Cadets will spend several lessons in a computer lab environment. Department of Systems Engineering
SS201 ECONOMICS-PRINCPLES/PROBLEMS 3.5 This standard course presents the basic principles of economic analysis and their application to contemporary economic problems and supports the further study of economics and related disciplines in the social sciences. The course is organized into three general sections: microeconomics, outlining basic theory of allocation by supply and demand in a market economy and relating this theory to contemporary issues; macroeconomics, surveying the theory of aggregate economics and illustrating the application of macroeconomic theory to public policy in the American economy; and international economics, introducing trade theory and international monetary theory and policy and application of economics to selected public policy issues (taxation and resource allocations, provision of public goods, etc). Cadets examine the implications of economics on national security and defense, and the use of economic analysis to improve decisions they will make as Army officers. Department of Social Sciences
SS202 AMERICAN POLITICS 3.5 This course explores the American political system ý how it works, its strengths, its weaknesses, its conflicts, its controversies. The course emphasizes how our democracy makes decisions about politics & policy to balance the many competing values and demands of a free society. The course begins with the study of the constitutional foundations of American government and then examines political behavior, institutions of government, and the policy making process. The course integrates the study of civil-military relations and the broader study of political science as a discipline throughout the semester. Department of Social Sciences
SS251 ADVANCED ECONOMICS 3.5 This advanced version of SS201 presents the basic principles of economic analysis with a greater focus on their application to contemporary economic problems. The course is organized into three general sections: Microeconomics, outlining basic theory of allocation by supply and demand in a market economy and relating this theory to contemporary issues; Macroeconomics, surveying the theory of aggregate economics and illustrating the application of macroeconomic theory to public policy in the American economy; and International Economics, introducing trade theory and comparative advantage. Cadets examine and present their analysis of the implications of economics on national security, defense, as well as current policy issues as well as learning the use of economic analysis to improve decisions they will make as Army officers. Department of Social Sciences
SS252 ADVANCED AMERICAN POLITICS 3.5 This course provides selected students the opportunity to examine political power, political organization, and political action. The structure of the course is similar to that discussed in SS202 listed above. Students will learn how political scientists analyze the events and behaviors called "politics" using theoretical perspectives. Students will sharpen their critical thinking and writing skills through a research project, case studies, and class presentations. Department of Social Sciences
SS307 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 3.5 The objectives of this course are to provide cadets with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of international politics and the analytical tools necessary to evaluate "why states do what they do." In accomplishing these objectives, SS307 builds upon a cadet's prior academic training in history, English and philosophy, economics, and political science. Emphasizing intellectual pluralism, SS307 focuses on the value of self-consciously applying different theoretical perspectives to international events to obtain improved understanding. Cadets examine key issues such as the consequences of anarchy, the need for security, the role of power, the use of force, international trade and markets, alternative political philosophies, foreign policy making, and the influence of culture in international affairs. Department of Social Sciences
SS357 ADV INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 3.5 This advanced version of SS307 presents cadets with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of international politics and the analytical tools necessary to evaluate “why states do what they do” with a more in-depth focus on their application to current international events. SS357 also introduces students to a wider range of theoretical approaches and applications. Emphasis is on rigorous, critical analysis, and classroom discussion. Department of Social Sciences
SS360 POLITICAL ANALYSIS 3 This course is an introduction to the methods and techniques of research in contemporary political science. It is designed to improve students’ ability to think critically about politics. This course differs from many other courses in its emphasis building critical thinking skills rather than mastering specific facts and theories. The most important of these skills are inference and causal reasoning. Rather than simply accepting “expert” answers to fundamental questions of political life, students will learn how to critically evaluate previous answers offered by others. Much of this course is devoted to practical exercises in which cadets put various research methods to work to answer important questions relevant to the field of political science. The course covers the philosophy of science, experimental method in the social sciences, quantitative analysis, and survey research. Department of Social Sciences
SS366 COMPARATIVE POLITICS 3 The objectives of this course are to analyze the sources of stability or instability in political regimes, and to examine the conditions that promote either democracy or dictatorship. Our first task is to describe different regimes--what do we mean when we call one democratic and another authoritarian? We approach this first task by building a regime model. As we do so we seek to understand what makes political regimes stable or unstable by analyzing their effectiveness, popular legitimacy, and institutional adaptability. All regimes are challenged by change, but some remain stable in the face of change, while others are transformed. Why? And is it possible to argue that there is a “best” type of regime? Are there universally valid criteria -- across time and space -- that we can use to compare regimes? Why do regimes succeed, fail, and change? As well as being central to the discipline of political science, these questions also play an important role in world politics and the formulation of US foreign policy. Since we are both students of political science and professionals who will serve as policy executors, the study of comparative politics offers significant rewards. After building the model we take it through various regions of the world, using the comparative method, analyzing the variables which change from regime to regime in liberal democracies, communist and post-communist states, newly industrializing and less developed countries, and the Islamic world. Department of Social Sciences
SS368 ECONOMETRICS I 3 This course is designed to teach students how to quantify, test, and employ economic theories as they are used in real world applications. The course covers the use of economic theory and data in the construction, estimation, and interpretation of econometric models. Special emphasis is placed on estimation of parameters of economic models and statistical inference using estimated models to determine the validity of economic theories. The primary mathematical tool employed in the course is multiple regression analysis. A number of applications demonstrate the use of the techniques studied. Department of Social Sciences
SS370 MASS MEDIA & AMER POLITICS 3 This seminar introduces cadets to what is perhaps the single most influential private institution in the American political system ý oftentimes referred to as the ýfourth branchý or ýfourth estateý of American government. The mass media, to include newspapers, television journalism, radio, the arts, and the internet, receive both theoretical and practical inquiry. In particular, the roles, motivations, and effects of the constitutionally protected media on American political institutions and policymaking are extensively probed. One third of the course is dedicated to the study of the relationship between the military and the media in order to develop meaningful policy prescriptions for future deployments and another third of the classes are dedicated to prominent guest speakers. Finally, the semester is topped off with a trip section to New York City to meet with the NYT, Fox News and MSNBC to round out the educational experience. Department of Social Sciences
SS372 POLITICS AND GOV OF CHINA 3 Lecture/seminar course designed to introduce the cadets to the politics and government of China. In particular, cadets will study the domestic politics of China beginning with the rise of the Chinese Communist movement. China's unique culture and the Mao years are examined as well as their impact on the past and emerging political system. Recent reforms and their implications for political, social, economic and military structures and processes will be examined as well as the tensions that have evolved. External developments such as Hong Kong's reversion to China, developments in Taiwan, changes in Central Asia, as well as China's emergence as a regional and world power will be considered. What are the different approaches to analyzing Chinese politics and government? What factors determine state legitimacy and influence internal choices? How does China's domestic situation influence its external relations? Department of Social Sciences
SS373 THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY 3 This seminar examines the concept of executive power and authority with particular emphasis on the institution of the presidency in the American political system. The course will analyze the constitutional origins and evolution of the presidency. We will place particular emphasis on the formal rules and informal norms that developed since the Founding and frame presidential behavior. We will analyze the various factors that influence the perpetual transformation of the institutional organization and operation of the modern executive branch. The course will examine the dynamic relationships the executive branch maintains with other branches of government, the media, the public, and other key stakeholders and how these relationships shape the development of public policy. Department of Social Sciences
SS376 AMERICAN POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT 3 This seminar examines American political life, concentrating on the historical, political, economic and philosophical debates that shape our distinctive governing institutions, ideas, and political culture. Students will explain the public policy process and reflect upon political change from a variety of perspectives to include: the founders, historical and contemporary government actors, and the people. Starting with a discussion on colonial rule and the founding era, the course surveys the development of the American political system, discussing topics such as the "liberal tradition", democratic citizenship and participation, social policy in the twentieth century, civil-military relations, political parties and elections, and the role of religion in public life. The course includes discussion on theories of institutional and cultural change in the constitutional order and raises strategic questions about preservation, maintenance, and reform of the American political system. Department of Social Sciences
SS377 POLITICS & GOV OF EUROPE 3 This course focuses on the political systems and cultures of the European Union (EU) and its Member States. First, the student is introduced to the EU, its historical development and institutional design. Implications of deepening European integration on international relations theory and state sovereignty are explored indepth. This block culminates with a study of Transatlantic security issues. Students will explore possibilities for cooperation or role competition between the military forces of the EU and NATO, with a focus on the influence of the US on the European continent. This theme continues to be highlighted throughout the remainder of the course. After this introductory block, students will get an overview of European state politics and look at several country case studies, both for current and aspiring member states of the EU, including a focus on democratization and the post-Communist legacy in Eastern Europe. Themes that run through each case study include how history affects political culture and institutional design within European states, and how these differing cultures and systems have been integrated into, or conflicted with, an increasingly centralized EU. Concepts learned in the course will be continuously applied to discussion of current challenges facing the EU and its Member States. Department of Social Sciences
SS378 ADV INTL RELATIONS THEORY 3 This course uses the foundation provided by SS307/357 to provide cadets with an in-depth assessment of the field of international relations. The course begins by evaluating alternative theoretical perspectives, including realism, liberalism/institutionalism, and constructivism. Cadets are introduced to classic as well as contemporary works, which are examined in terms of their cultural, political, and academic context. Cadets examine topical cases pertaining to war, wealth, and state formation/transformation. Throughout the course, cadets explore the value and limitations of IR theory in framing and implementing policy. Department of Social Sciences
SS380 MANPOWER-LABOR ECONOMICS 3 This course studies the nature and determinants of pay and employment. The course emphasizes the role of institutions which are significant in determining the pattern and speed of adjustment in the labor market. The traditional tools of micro and macroeconomics and econometrics are employed. Military manpower is examined as an application of the theories developed during the course. Department of Social Sciences
SS381 CULTURAL/POLIT ANTHROPOLOGY 3 The overall course goal is to provide a rich and interesting introduction to the field of anthropology. Anthropology is a holistic discipline encompassing elements of political science, economics, sociology, linguistics, and psychology. Emphasizing that one's culture is a "learned" condition, students explore the concept of cultural relativism and gain an appreciation for the diversity of human cultures and the interrelation of social, political and economic organizations. Students also examine the sub-discipline of Applied Anthropology which seeks to solve contemporary social/political problems such as ethnic conflict. A highlight of this course, students actively conduct anthropological fieldwork within the West Point community. Students develop their personal abilities to recognize their own personal biases and therefore better understand, interact and communicate with peoples from other cultural backgrounds. This is a crucial skill for future Army officers in the 21st century as recent deployment patterns have shown soldiers operating in non-traditional situations. Department of Social Sciences
SS382 MICROECONOMICS 3 This course is a theory course in which cadets develop a thorough understanding of microeconomic modeling and models; it is a prerequisite for most downstream economics courses. The course develops a methodology that economists use to study the interaction among individual economic agents (such as consumers, firms and the government) and the allocation of scarce resources among these agents. The goal is for cadets to understand optimization, markets, and to some extent policy-making, using an integrated, theoretical model. Ultimately the consequence of a change in the market environment, in public policy or in the global economy can be assessed vis-+-vis its impact on individual economic agents. Department of Social Sciences
SS385 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS 3 This course provides cadets with the tools and knowledge for analyzing the effectiveness of different economic systems and efforts to change them. The major course objectives include an examination of the following: the historical evolution of prominent economic philosophy and theory on the functioning of capitalist and non-capitalist systems; the methods of defining and evaluating economic systems in terms of the rules and the cultural, political, legal, financial, and labor institutions that comprise an economy; the methods of institutional and cultural change and the challenges they face in the transition from a command or traditional economy to a market economy; and the paths less developed countries may pursue towards economic development. At the end of the course students understand how differences among nations’ economic systems might result in differences in their economic outcomes and how nations might go about changing their systems. Department of Social Sciences
SS386 POLITICAL THOUGHT AND IDEAS 3 Students will read critically the original works of major political thinkers, with the goal of examining different perspectives on the principal questions of political thought. Among these are: "Is government based on the consent of the citizenry?", "What constitutes a just society?", "What is the purpose of government?", "Are freedom and equality reconcilable?" As a result of taking this course, the student will not only understand these central questions, but also be able to apply the theoretical prescriptions offered by thinkers to contemporary political issues currently debated throughout the world. Department of Social Sciences
SS387 ECONOMICS OF PUBLIC POLICY 3 This course adds depth to the cadet's understanding of the fundamentals of micro- and macroeconomics. In particular, the course examines practical and theoretical issues in social welfare, public expenditures, taxation, and public choice. The course develops understanding of the value of economic models in addressing complex policy questions that occur in a fluid political environment, sharpens analytic skills, and provides a bridge to the higher level theoretical models used in the study of the national political economy. Department of Social Sciences
SS388 MACROECONOMICS 3 This course is dedicated to the study of aggregate economic activity. The course examines the determinants of long run growth, and then addresses short run economic fluctuations. The course uses various models, including the Solow Growth Model, the IS-lM model, and the Aggregate Demand - Aggregate Supply model. The microeconomic foundations for macroeconomics are discussed, and current macroeconomic policy issues are debated. These issues are discussed within the context of both open and closed economies. Department of Social Sciences
SS394 FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS 3 This course is an organizational leader's introduction to financial and managerial accounting, essential topics for students concentrating in engineering management, general management and economics. Cadets study the Accounting Cycle in detail, starting with analysis and recording of business transactions and culminating in the production of the financial statements of the corporation. Cadets also study basic principles of asset valuation, revenue and cost recognition, and analytical techniques for individual asset, liability, and capital accounts. The Managerial Accounting block is focused on cost-volume-profit analysis, Job-order Costing, and Activity Based Costing. The course culminates with a complete financial statement analysis comparison of three companies that enables cadets to apply the concepts of both financial and managerial accounting to modern corporations to answer the question: "Which company is well-managed today and best-positioned for success in the future?" Department of Social Sciences
SS462 POST-CONFLICT ECON DEVELOPMENT 3 Economic Development in a Post-Conflict Environment aims to introduce the fundamental concepts in economic growth, to explain and discuss the theories of economic growth, to understand the sources of economic growth, to assess the difference in growth and wealth among countries and to increase student interest in economic growth theory. It is a course designed for economics majors with an explicit purpose of familiarizing future officers with the basic theory of economic growth and development and applying theses theories to post-conflict environments. The course achieves immediate relevance by examining the role of the military in economic development and understanding how economic development can help them be more effective members of the military profession. The course is designed as a seminar with the expectation of adequate preparation and spirited class discussion. Department of Social Sciences
SS464 HOMELAND SECURITY 3 The purpose of SS464 is to address the complex challenges of homeland security through an interdisciplinary approach. The goal of this course is to provide future leaders with a thorough understanding of the homeland security policy area. This course explores how the evolving nature of the terorist threat, particularly catastrophic terrorism, poses unprecedented and complex challenges to how America provides for its security. The course examines how homeland security policy intersects with other domestic and foreign policy issues, how our federalist system of government affects homeland security, and how moral, ethical, and civil liberties concerns complicate the development of effective homeland security policies. By analyzing the threat and developing an understanding of the unique policy problems and tools of homeland security, the course enables students to critically assess national efforts in such areas as border security, domestic counterterrorism policy, critical infrastructure protection, and emergency preparedness and response. Students will learn about the major policy and institutional reforms underway in the homeland security policy area, examine whether these changes are improving or will improve U.S. security policy, and develop their own views on the direction of national homeland security policy. The course will enable students to think critically about how the United States' overseas efforts to combat terrorism, preempt emerging threats, and counter the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction relate to domestic homeland security efforts. By the end of the course, students will gain a solid intellectual foundation to think critically and creatively about America's efforts to prevent terrorist attacks within the United States, reduce our vulnerability to terrorist attack, and minimize the damage and recover from attacks that may occur. Department of Social Sciences
SS465 TERRORISM: NEW CHALLENGES 3 The purpose of SS465, is to address the challenges of terrorism in the current and future global security environment through an interdisciplinary approach. Specifically, this course examines the unique challenge terrorism poses to liberal democratic states, policy makers and to military professionals. By analyzing the different perspectives of terrorism, given a variety of political and strategic contexts, students better understand terrorist motivations, strategies, means and ends. Finally, the course explores how a liberal democratic state can best fight terrorism in this new threat environment. Department of Social Sciences
SS468 POLITICAL PARTICIPATION 3 This course provides a broad understanding of the dynamics of political participation. The goals of this course are two-fold. First, it comprehensively examines both individual and group participation, as well as the many ways in which participation manifests itself in the democratic process, namely in the form of electoral (voting, campaigning) and non-electoral behavior (“civicness”, group action, etc). As such, this course will include topics in public opinion, the electoral process, and voting behavior. Second, the approach is both empirical - and theoretical. This course examines results of electoral behavior (primarily U.S. national and state elections), complemented with competing theoretical approaches which serve to explain and better understand this behavior. Department of Social Sciences
SS469 ECONOMETRICS II 3 This course is designed to teach students advanced concepts in estimation and statistical inference. Building upon the material covered in SS368, students will learn how to test for failure of the data to meet the assumptions of the basic regression model and how to allow for these departures from the standard assumptions during estimation. Among the topics covered will be Generalized Least Squares, Time Series, Instrumental Variables, and Simultaneous Equations estimation. Application of the techniques to the estimation of economic models using actual economic data is an integral part of the instruction. The course makes substantial use of statistical software packages. Department of Social Sciences
SS470 MONEY AND BANKING 3 SS470 is a senior level economics course whose primary purpose is to provide depth in the student's background and understanding of macroeconomics and international economics. The focus of the course is on the financial sector of the economy, which provides the means to transfer savings from firms, households, and governments to investors who want to purchase new capital goods. The course begins by discussing the various types of financial institutions and examines the importance of financial intermediation. The course then identifies how to measure the risks faced by financial institutions and how to manage these same risks. Department of Social Sciences
SS473 AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY 3 This course examines the development, implementation, and consequences of American foreign policy. It analyzes the actors who make American foreign policy, concentrating both on government sources such as the president, Congress, and the foreign policy bureaucracy, as well as external sources such as public opinion, interest groups, and the media. The course examines key events in U.S. foreign policy history through the lens of 'policy choice.' What choices did U.S. foreign policy makers confront? What policy did they choose to implement and why? What were the consequences of that policy? Utilizing the lessons from these historical case studies, the course then examines the current challenges and dilemmas that confront the United States. Some of these include U.S. relations with China, Russia, and the European Union, energy politics, the Arab-Israeli crisis, weapons of mass destruction and rogue states, terrorism, democracy promotion, and the global response to US foreign policy. In exploring each of these current challenges and dilemmas, this course attempts to understand the policies and strategies the U.S. utilizes to secure its interests and achieve its objectives. Department of Social Sciences
SS475 DEMOCRATIZATION 3 This course explores the fundamental political concepts of democracy and democratization. The assigned readings examine the normative and practical underpinnings of democracy, as well as the specific causes – and potential reversals -- of the “Third Wave” of democratization that has spread throughout the world over the past three decades. The course also debates effective American policy choices for newly emergent democracies that often suffer from instability and inequality. SS475 places particular emphasis on the states of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, and on the problem of constructing a new post-Soviet security architecture in a context of democratization. The course also applies democratization concepts to the Middle East with case studies in Iraq and Afghanistan. Department of Social Sciences
SS477 ECONOMICS OF NATIONAL SECURITY 3 This is a capstone course for the economics major that is designed to integrate microeconomics, macroeconomics, and econometrics and apply tools learned in those courses to address policy relevant issues in the economics of national security. The course also applies microeconomic analysis to case studies on defense personnel policies and weapon-system acquisition. The course discusses defense budgeting, including tracking the current Presidential budget submission, from the perspective of public finance and examines the economic impact of defense spending. Students use relevant databases, econometrics, and the skills they have learned as economics majors to prepare and present projects that analyze major defense and public policy decisions. Department of Social Sciences
SS480 ADV AM POLITICS, POLICY, STRAT 3 This course examines the major concepts, theoretical frameworks, and substantive dilemmas of the public policymaking process. The aim of this course is to arm students with a myriad of tools to understand, evaluate, and contextualize specific political problems in the public policy arena. SS480 is the capstone course for American Politics majors in the Social Sciences Department. Students will be expected to integrate the concepts of not only "Sosh" basic, toolbox, and elective courses, but knowledge acquired from other courses from other disciplines as well. Public policy spans the disciplines of politics, economics, sociology, philosophy, and psychology, as policymakers wrestle with developing and implementing value-laden decisions in a world of scarcity and uncertainty. As such, the student of public policy must use a variety of social science tools - and increasingly, physical science tools as well as to dissect policy problems, develop viable and feasible alternatives, and fashion methods of adoption and implementation. Consequently, this course is designed to build upon the student's conceptual and analytical base in the quest to establish and refine a systematic approach to public policy analysis, formulation, adoption, and implementation. Department of Social Sciences
SS483 NATIONAL SECURITY SEMINAR 3 The International Politics capstone seminar provides an overview of U.S. national security policy and examines the military, political, and economic factors that influence its formulation. It establishes a conceptual framework for exploring how national interests are translated into national security policy and force structure. The course addresses three central issues: (1) the appropriate ends of national security policy, (2) the means by which we should pursue those ends, and (3) matching means with ends. Since many factors impact on strategic decisions, the course includes discussion of international, domestic, and organizational influences on national security policy. Theoretical readings combine with case studies of past and current U.S. strategic choices to illuminate critical points. The course closes by applying the lens of strategy to conduct an analysis of current proposals to revamp the structure of the Army. Department of Social Sciences
SS486 INTERNATIONAL SECURITY SEMINAR 3 This Comparative Politics capstone seminar examines the special historical, domestic, and external security issues that non-Western states face, and then examines how such issues influence these states’ formulation of their national security policies. Students explore how non-Western state regimes might use limited diplomatic, information, military, and economic means to achieve their regime goals. Students apply newly learned or previously learned IR or CP theories to analyze a non-Western state’s national security strategy, and then attempt to anticipate what such states might do under current domestic and international conditions. Department of Social Sciences
SS490A COLLOQUIUM (AMER POLITICS) 3 The colloquium provides cadets an opportunity for reading and analysis in depth in a topic area of special interest and timely relevance to their concentration. The course employs the seminar approach in which the instructor meets with small groups to discuss assigned readings, and cadets present their own analyses to the group. Course directors develop topics and determine the semesters in which they will be offered. Department Academic Counselors then forward course offerings and descriptions to Social Science majors and those majoring in areas related to the colloquium topic. Topics will vary by year but recent SS490 colloquiums include: Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict; Politics and Film; the Politics of Intelligence; Politics and Government of South and Southeast Asia; Philosophy, Religion, and Terror; and Winning the Peace. Department of Social Sciences
SS490B COLLOQUIUM (COMP POLITICS) 3 The colloquium provides cadets an opportunity for reading and analysis in depth in a topic area of special interest and timely relevance to their concentration. The course employs the seminar approach in which the instructor meets with small groups to discuss assigned readings, and cadets present their own analyses to the group. Course directors develop topics and determine the semesters in which they will be offered. Department Academic Counselors then forward course offerings and descriptions to Social Science majors and those majoring in areas related to the colloquium topic. Topics will vary by year but recent SS490 colloquiums include: Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict; Politics and Film; the Politics of Intelligence; Politics and Government of South and Southeast Asia; Philosophy, Religion, and Terror; and Winning the Peace. Department of Social Sciences
SS490C COLLOQUIUM (INTER RELATIONS) 3 The colloquium provides cadets an opportunity for reading and analysis in depth in a topic area of special interest and timely relevance to their concentration. The course employs the seminar approach in which the instructor meets with small groups to discuss assigned readings, and cadets present their own analyses to the group. Course directors develop topics and determine the semesters in which they will be offered. Department Academic Counselors then forward course offerings and descriptions to Social Science majors and those majoring in areas related to the colloquium topic. Topics will vary by year but recent SS490 colloquiums include: Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict; Politics and Film; the Politics of Intelligence; Politics and Government of South and Southeast Asia; Philosophy, Religion, and Terror; and Winning the Peace. Department of Social Sciences
SS490D COLLOQUIUM (ECONOMICS) 3 The colloquium provides cadets an opportunity for reading and analysis in depth in a topic area of special interest and timely relevance to their concentration. The course employs the seminar approach in which the instructor meets with small groups to discuss assigned readings, and cadets present their own analyses to the group. Course directors develop topics and determine the semesters in which they will be offered. Department Academic Counselors then forward course offerings and descriptions to Social Science majors and those majoring in areas related to the colloquium topic. Topics will vary by year but recent SS490 colloquiums include: Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict; Politics and Film; the Politics of Intelligence; Politics and Government of South and Southeast Asia; Philosophy, Religion, and Terror; and Winning the Peace. Department of Social Sciences
SS491 SENIOR STUDIES-INTNL RELATIONS 3 This course provides cadets an opportunity for reading and analysis in depth in a topic area of special interest and timely relevance to their concentration. The course employs the seminar approach in which a senior faculty member meets with small groups to discuss assigned readings, and cadets present their own analyses to the group. Course directors develop topics and determine the semesters in which they will be offered. Department Academic Counselors then forward course offerings and descriptions to Social Science majors and those majoring in areas related to the senior studies topic. Topics will vary by year but recent senior studies include: Homeland Security, Advanced Terrorism, and Environmental Economics. Department of Social Sciences
SS494 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE 3 Principles of Finance is a first course in corporate finance. The course focuses on the study of the basic principles of finance and applying them to important decisions faced by the financial manager. The course covers the following topics: project analysis using the Net Present Value technique; risk and return for assets and projects; efficient capital markets; corporate capital structure and dividend policy; and derivatives. Specifically, cadets will learn how to value a project or a company using several different methods. Cadets will analyze an actual project or corporation using the techniques that they learn in the course. As the US Military continues to privatize many functions, knowledge of techniques used by corporations is becoming essential for our future Army leaders. Department of Social Sciences
XE402 INTERDISC INTEGRATIVE EXPR 3 This course gives cadets who are completing the EE or CS 3-course engineering sequence an opportunity to participate on senior design project teams in an integrative experience environment. The first half of the course requires analysis of economic, social, political, ethical, and other considerations related to the problem facing the team. During the second half of the course, each analysis is factored into the proposed solution while considering technical trade-offs. In the case of low enrollment in this course, cadets may act as consultants to more than one project team. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
XE472 DYNAMIC MODELING AND CONTROL 3 This course covers dynamic modeling and control of linear systems. The course provides an overview of classical control theory as the foundation for control applications in electrical, mechanical, and aeronautical systems. Topics here include system modeling using Laplace transform, frequency domain, and state variable methods. Mathematical models are developed for electrical, mechanical, aeronautical, chemical and other physical control systems. Control systems analysis and design techniques are studied within the context of how each system is physically controlled in practice. Laboratory exercises include feedback design and system identification. Computer design exercises include dynamic modeling and control of various engineering systems. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
XE475 MECHATRONICS 3.5 XE 475 is a comprehensive introductory course in the field of mechatronics. Mechatronics is the crossroads in engineering where mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, computer science, and controls engineering meet to create new and exciting real-world systems. Knowledge of mechanical and electrical components, controls theory, and design are integrated to solve actual physical design applications. Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering
XH497 CRITICAL THOUGHT 3 The purpose of XH497, Critical Thought is to improve cadets' ability to evaluate complex issues involving ethical judgements and choice among scarce resources, reach reasoned positions on these issues, and effectively argue their positions verbally and in writing. The process of pursuing this goal will make cadets better officers, scholars, and citizens. The course will employ several methods to assist in this pursuit. First, it will achieve breadth by focusing on current issues from a variety of fields, examining the "hard choices" that confront society, government, military leaders, and individual citizens. Among the disciplines from which the course will draw are Philosophy, Law, Political Science, Economics, Physics, Biology, and English. Each cadet will also be assigned an individual mentor from among the faculty of the Departments of Social Sciences, History, Law, or English. Requirements include a briefing on a current issue in the cadet's major field, a book review, and a personal statement summarizing academic and other goals. Department of Social Sciences
XS391 PRIN & APPL OF ENV CHEM 3 This course examines chemical interactions of pollutants in air, soil, and water systems. The focus of the course is problem solving with the following topic coverage: approximately 80% applied aquatic chemistry, 15% environmental organic chemistry, and 5% applied analytical chemistry. Specific topics include the chemistry applied in drinking water production and the chemical aspects of industrial and hazardous waste treatment. The fate of heavy metals and organic contaminants in soil and aqueous systems is also discussed. Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering
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