Mathematics Department

Upcoming Talks

This is a list of all upcoming talks for the next two weeks. Talks are from 3:45-4:45 p.m. in the Colloquium or Seminar Room, unless otherwise specified.

  • Sep
    08
  • Bipartite Community Detection
    Kelly Yancey
    University of Maryland
    Applied Math Seminar

    View Abstract

    Community detection in data is a large and ongoing area of research. A community in a graph is a vertex set S such that there are many edges between the vertices of S. Recently the combinatorial Laplacian and the normalized Laplacian of a graph have been used to describe the community structure of the graph. Specifically, analyzing the smallest eigenpairs can be used to find a set of good communities. In this talk we are specifically interested in bipartite community detection, that is we are interested in finding two subsets of the graph S and S' where the number of edges between S and S' is significantly more than expected. This type of community detection has already been implemented in studying protein interactions. We will present the algorithm for detecting bipartite communities. We will also discuss the limits of the algorithm for finding bipartite communities. Specifically, we will discuss why one of these bounds is sharp. These graphs are also of independent interest as there construction has applications to such fields as coding theory.
  • Sep
    09
  • TBA
    Prof. Naomi Utgoff
    USNA (Economics)
    Time: 03:45 PM
    Colloquium Series
  • Sep
    14
  • What is a flag incidence algebra?
    Max Wakefield
    Naval Academy
    Location: Seminar Room
    Time: 12:00 PM
    Basic Notions Seminars

    View Abstract

    A classical incidence algebra contains many important invariants throughout mathematics. In this lecture we will examine applications in number theory (Euler's phi function), geometry (Euler characteristic), and graph theory (chromatic polynomial). Then we will describe a possible generalization to higher dimensions which we call a flag incidence algebra.
  • Sep
    16
  • Dynamical behaviors Typically seen: Chaos and Quasiperiodicity
    Prof. James Yorke
    University of Maryland
    Time: 03:45 PM
    Colloquium Series
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