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History Department

Hayden Bellenoit

Associate Professor

Modern South Asian History

  •  Phone: +1 (410) 293-6299
  •  E-mail: bellenoi@usna.edu
  •   Department of History
        US Naval Academy
        Annapolis, MD 21402

Education


  • D.Phil., Oxford University
  • M.A., Oxford University
  • B.A., Wheaton College (Massachusetts)


Research Interest:


Indian social, cultural, economic and religious history; History of Islam and Persian cultural influence & traditions in India; 18th century & the 'transition to colonialism'; Hinduism, Islam, Sikhism, Jainism and Buddhism; India, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nepal

Peer reviewed books and monographs


  • The Formation of the Colonial State in India: Scribes, Paper and Taxes, 1760-1860, (Routledge, 2017)
  • Missionary Education and Empire in late colonial India, 1860-1920 (Pickering & Chatto, 2007; Paperback with Routledge, 2016)

Peer reviewed articles in journals and edited volumes


  • 'Between qanungos and clerks: the cultural and service worlds of Hindustan’s pensmen', c.1750-1900’, Modern Asian Studies (Cambridge University Press), 48 (4), 2014
  • 'Education, Missionaries and the Indian Nation, c.1880-1920', in P.V. Rao, ed., Perspectives on the History of Education in India (New Delhi: OrientBlackswan, 2013)
  • ‘Paper, pens and power between empires in north India, 1750–1850’, South Asian History and Culture (Oxford: Taylor & Francis) 3 (3), 2012
  • ‘Missionary Education, Religion and Knowledge in India, c.1880-1915’, Modern Asian Studies, (Cambridge University Press), 41 (2), 2007

Invited Book reviews


  • Review of B. Raman, ‘Document Raj: Writing and Scribes in Early Colonial South India’, American Historical Review, June 2013
  • Review of P. Sengupta, ‘Pedagogy for Religion: Missionary education and the fashioning of Hindus and Muslims in Bengal’, Journal of Hindu Studies, July 2013
  • Review of S. Seth, ‘Educating subjects: the western education of colonial India’, Indian Economic and Social History Review, June 2009
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