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Nimitz Library
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Manuscript Collections

Links on this page are to individual finding aids.  To search across all manuscript finding aids, please go to the Manuscript Collection Finding Aids page.

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Journal of a Cruise in the U.S. St[eame]r. Lackawanna Pacific Station, 1880-1881, (transferred to MS 4)
No description available.
Letterbook of the U.S.S. Lackawanna, 1880-1881, (transferred to MS 4)
No description available.
Henry Ellis Lackey Papers, 1864-1939 (bulk 1894-1939), MS 252
Henry Ellis Lackey was a Rear Admiral in the United States Navy and a member of the United States Naval Academy Class of 1899. The Lackey Papers consist of a scrapbook of Lackey's experiences at the U.S. Naval Academy and a book of calling cards from his command of Squadron 40 (Temporary) in the late 1930's.
Oscar H. Lackey Papers, 1858-1906 (bulk 1858-1883), MS 386
Oscar Hamilton Lackey entered the U.S. Navy in 1858 as a third assistant engineer and rose to the rank of chief engineer. The bulk of the collection consists of letters to his wife, Clara Caroline Stone Lackey, and documents from the Engineering Department of U.S.S. Wyoming. Their son Henry Ellis Lackey was an 1899 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy.
Rudolphus R. Cockle's Log of the U.S.S. Lancaster, 1881-1883, MS 132
The volume, compiled by Rudolphus R. Cockle, United States Naval Academy Class of 1881, is a practice log spanning from August 26, 1881 through February 20, 1882, during which time Cockle was attached to U.S.S. Lancaster, under the command of Bancroft Gherardi. Attached to the European Squadron, Dresser records weather/sailing conditions, ship's location, and daily occurrences aboard Lancaster, as well as the British naval bombardment of Alexandria, Egypt (July 11-12, 1882).
James W. Dresser's Log of the U.S.S. Lancaster, 1881-1882, MS 130
The volume, compiled by James W. Dresser, United States Naval Academy Class of 1881, is a practice log spanning from August 26, 1881 through October 31, 1882, during which time Dresser was attached to U.S.S. Lancaster, under the command of Bancroft Gherardi. Attached to the European Squadron, Dresser records weather/sailing conditions, ship's location, and daily occurrences aboard Lancaster, as well as the British naval bombardment of Alexandria, Egypt (July 11-12, 1882).
William F. Flournoy's Log of the U.S.S. Lancaster and U.S.S. Quinnebaug, 1881-1883, MS 134
The volume, compiled by William F. Flournoy, United States Naval Academy Class of 1881, is a practice log spanning from August 26, 1881 through April 4, 1883, during which time Flournoy was attached to the European Squadron. Initially attached to U.S.S. Lancaster, Flournoy transferred to U.S.S. Quinnebaug on May 1, 1882. Quinnebaug made calls at Villefranche, Port Mahon, Gibraltar, Messina, Alexandria, Palermo, Naples, Venice, and Genoa. The logbook records weather/sailing conditions, ship's location, and daily occurrences aboard ship. The entries of July 11-12, 1882 pertain to the British naval bombardment of Alexandria, Egypt.
Guy G. Rodgers' Log of the U.S.S. Lancaster, 1881-1882, MS 133
The volume, compiled by Guy G. Rogers, United States Naval Academy Class of 1881, is a practice log spanning from August 26, 1881 through October 24, 1882, during which time Rogers was attached to U.S.S. Lancaster, under the command of Bancroft Gherardi. Attached to the European Squadron, Dresser records weather/sailing conditions, ship's location, and daily occurrences aboard Lancaster, as well as the British naval bombardment of Alexandria, Egypt (July 11-12, 1882).
Guy G. Rodgers' Log of the U.S.S. Lancaster, 1882-1883, MS 135
The volume, compiled by Guy G. Rogers, United States Naval Academy Class of 1881, is a practice log spanning from November 28, 1882 through April 8, 1883, during which time Rogers was attached to U.S.S. Lancaster, under the command of Bancroft Gherardi. Attached to the European Squadron, the Lancaster made calls at Naples, Leghorn, Genoa, Villefranche, Gibraltar, Plymouth, Southampton, and Le Havre. The logbook records weather/sailing conditions, ship's location, and daily occurrences aboard ship.
David L. Printup's Log of the U.S.S. Lancaster, U.S.S. Nipsic, and U.S.S. Galena, 1881-1882, MS 131
The volume, compiled by David L. Printup, United States Naval Academy Class of 1881, is a practice log spanning from August 26, 1881 through December 14, 1882, during which time Printup was attached to several vessels of the European Squadron. The logbook, which records the ships' course, speed, weather, and daily occurrences, also includes entries on a visit by the King and Queen of Greece (March 25, 1882), taking aboard Alexandrian refugees (June 1882), and the British naval bombardment of Alexandria (July 11, 1882), after which Printup, aboard U.S.S. Galena, departed for the South Atlantic Station.
Moses A. Lane Papers, 1852-1888, MS 389
The Moses A. Lane Papers, consisting of fourteen handwritten letters (with typed transcriptions) and five photocopies of service records, span from 1852 to 1888 and offer a glimpse into the career and Civil War service of gunner Moses A. Lane.
John C. Lawrence Journal, 1844-1975 (bulk 1844-1845), MS 368
John Clarkson Lawrence was a mate in the United States Navy. The John C. Lawrence Journal, entitled "Journal of a Cruise amongst the Madeira, Canary and Cape Verde Islands and on the West Coast of Africa. 1845 & '45. in the United States Ship of War Yorktown. Capt. Chas H Bell," covers the time period of 13 November 1844 through 7 December 1845 while Yorktownwas engaged in suppressing the slave trade.
William P. Lawrence Papers, 1863-2010 (bulk 1941-2001), MS 403
William Porter Lawrence, United States Naval Academy Class of 1951, was a naval aviator and a career officer in the U.S. Navy, retiring with the rank of Vice Admiral. The Lawrence Papers span from 1863 until 2010, and describe various events and aspects of Lawrence's naval career and personal life, including his studies as a midshipman at the United States Naval Academy; career as an aviator and officer in the United States Navy; experiences as a prisoner of war in Vietnam; tour as Superintendent of the United States Naval Academy; and affiliations with the National Football Foundation and National Collegiate Athletic Association.
Richard P. Leary Papers, 1860-1905, MS 404
Richard P. Leary was an officer in the U.S. Navy and a member of the United States Naval Academy Class of 1864 who served during the Civil War and as Naval Governor or Guam. The Leary Papers primary focus on Leary's confrontation with the German corvette Adler in Samoa in 1888, his governorship of Guam from 1899 to 1900, the "Star-Spangled Banner" incident at League Island Naval Base in 1901, his illness and subsequent death in 1901, and newspaper articles on naval vessels in the Spanish-American War.
Lejeune Hall Dedication Collection, 1969-1982 (bulk 1981-1982), MS 241
Lejeune Hall, named after the 13th Commandant of the Marine Corps, Lieutenant General John Archer Lejeune, member of the Naval Academy Class of 1888, was dedicated on April 28, 1982. The Lejeune Hall Dedication Collection relates to the preparation and planning for the building's dedication, as well as the dedication ceremony itself.
Richard Leo Diary, 1917-1918, MS 361
Richard Leo was a baker in the United States Navy. The Richard Leo Diary spans Leo's time aboard the U.S.S. Florida (Battleship: BB-30), from 23 November 1917 to 16 June 1918, while Florida was assigned to the Grand Fleet at Scapa Flow during World War I.
Charles Lee Lewis Papers, 1918-1962 (approximate), MS 456
Charles Lee Lewis was a professor of English and History at the United States Naval Academy. The Charles Lee Lewis Papers span from 1918 until approximately 1962. Focusing on topics such as literature of the sea, 19th century naval history, and naval biography and fiction, the papers consist of Proceedings of the United States Naval Institute articles written throughout Lewis's career, as well as unpublished manuscripts written largely after Lewis's retirement from the United States Naval Academy.
John S. Lionberger Letterbook, 1916-1918, MS 220
John S. Lionberger was an officer in the United States Naval Reserve during World War I. The Lionberger Letterbook consists entirely of letters between John S. Lionberger and his father, Isaac H. Lionberger during John's training at Reserve Officer Training School at the United States Naval Academy during the summer of 1917 and subsequent service aboard U.S.S. North Dakota (Battleship : BB-29) during World War I.
Robert Lyman John Long Papers, 1977-1984, MS 340
Robert Lyman John Long was a one-time submarine commander, Vice Chief of Naval Operations, and Commander in Chief, United States Pacific Force in the United States Navy. The papers, consisting mostly of speeches, pertain to topics such as the role of the Navy in the Cold War, missions and goals of specific naval groups, international strategy, and the capabilities, objectives, forces, and strategic principles of the Pacific Command.
James C. Longino Papers, 1935-1995 (bulk 1935-1976), MS 421
James Charles Longino, Jr. was an Admiral in the United States Navy and a member of the United States Naval Academy Class of 1940. The papers are the product of Longino's thirty-six year career in the United States Navy and touch on nearly all of Longino's duty stations, with an emphasis on his service as an aviator in World War II and subsequent sea duties (including the recovery of Gemini 5), as well as his education experiences at the United States Naval Academy and Columbia University.

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