SI204: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE, FALL 2004

DR. BROWN, DR. NEEDHAM, DR. SCHULZE, DR. STAHL, CAPT YOUNG

COURSE POLICY

Course Coordinator

Assistant Professor Christopher W. Brown, wcbrown@usna.edu, Extension 6817

Web-Based Material

The course homepage is at
http://www.cs.usna.edu/~wcbrown/courses/SI204/
and you are responsible for information posted on this page. Expect material for every lecture!

Text

Using C++: An Introduction to Programming, 2nd Edition, Hennefeld, Baker, Burchard.

Course Goals


  1. To introduce the concepts of structured programming utilizing a high level programming language.
  2. To introduce problem solving methods and algorithmic development.
  3. To teach the design, coding, debugging and documentation of programs using structured programming techniques.

Student Outcomes

Students completing this course should be able to:
  1. discuss some of the theoretical and mathematical foundations of computer science,
  2. differentiate between amongst some of the classic algorithms and data structures,
  3. communicate programming-related material effectively, and
  4. evaluate some contemporary legal, social and ethical issues in computing professions.

Extra Instruction

You are strongly encouraged to see your instructor for extra instruction (EI) when you are having trouble with material.

Grading

The break-down on your final grades will be: Note: You will have to take and get 100% on a quiz covering the material in this policy and the departmental Policy Concerning Programming Projects referenced below. You may take the quiz as often as you need to, but you will receive an F at each marking period until you pass it with 100%.

Honor

You are expected to follow the guidance given in: Most important for you to review and understand is the Policy Concerning Programming Projects, which you can download at:

http://www.cs.usna.edu/academics/ProgrammingPolicy.pdf

To summarize these policies as they apply to this course:

Exams & Quizzes
All work on exams must be completely your own. No references are allowed unless explicitly specified by the instructor.
Homeworks & Labs
You may collaborate as much as you like on homework and in labs, but the actual pencil-to-paper or fingers-to-keyboard effort must be your own.
Projects
You must do your own work in designing, implementing, and testing your programming project without assistance from anyone except for your instructor. The Department Policy Concerning Programming Projects provides more detailed guidance.