SO286, Fall 2006

Quiz 1

 

(4) What characterizes geography as a discipline, and what is the special focus of physical geography?

 

(2) Is curvature of the earth a bigger problem for small scale or large scale maps?  Why?

 

(2) We are about to experience a significant event in the solar calendar later this month.  What is the event, and why is it important?

 

(2) Where will we get the most energy for remote sensing:

        Large or small pixels?

        Many narrow bands or fewer, wide bands?

        Active or passive sensor?

        Visible, IR, or microwave part of the spectrum?

 

(3)  How can we use different geometric forms for creating maps?  You can refer to the three diagrams below for your answer.

 

(4) What would we like to see in a map projection?  Give an example of something that we would like to see, and a second example of something we do not want to use.  Your examples should use something from the three maps below.

 

  

 

(3) The two graphs below show the times of sunrise (bottom curve) and sunset (top curve), and the duration of daylight at two locations on earth.  What can you say about the latitude or longitude of the two locations, and what enables you to say this?  Why would geographers care about the differences?

 

 

 


SO286, Fall 2006

Quiz 1 Makeup

 

(4) What characterizes geography as a discipline, and what is the special focus of physical geography?

  

 

(2) Is curvature of the earth a bigger problem for small scale or large scale maps?  Why?

  

(2) There was a significant event in the solar calendar in June.  What was the event, and why is it important?

 

(2) More energy makes remote sensing easier.  In each of the cases below, which will provide more energy:

        Large or small pixels?

        Many narrow bands or fewer, wide bands?

        Active or passive sensor?

        Visible, IR, or microwave part of the spectrum?

 

(3)  We can use three different geometric forms (like a cylinder) to create a map projection.  List the other two forms, and identify each with a map projection in the three diagrams below.

  

(4) What would we like to see in a map projection?  Give an example of something that we would like to see, and a second example of something we do not want to use, on each of two of the map projections below. 

  

 

(3) The two graphs below show the times of sunrise (bottom curve) and sunset (top curve), and the duration of daylight (middle curve) at two locations on earth.  What can you say about the latitude or longitude of the two locations, and what enables you to say this?  Why would geographers care about the differences?

 

 

 


SO286, Fall 2006

Quiz 2

 

(4)  Sketch the distribution of temperature in the atmosphere, and discuss why any changes in slope occur.

 

  

Consider the equator.  All of the following questions refer to the equator.  You can compare conditions at the equator to those elsewhere, but insure that you clearly state what happens at the equator and why this happens.

        (3) Which is greater at the top of the atmosphere, the amount of solar energy going downward, or the amount of energy going back out to space?  Why is this?

  

        (3) Over the course of the year, when will the amount of energy coming in be greatest?  When will it be the least?  Why?

  

        (2) How is the incoming energy different than the outgoing energy, in addition to the relative amounts?

 

          (3) What kinds of winds are found there, and what causes the winds to blow this way?

  

        (2) What is the typical air pressure found at the equator, and why is this the case?

 

 

(3) If you had to characterize the climate at the equator, what would be the most important characteristics?  What causes this?

SO286, Fall 2006

Quiz 2--Makeup

 

(4)  Sketch the distribution of temperature in the atmosphere, and discuss why any changes in slope occur.

 

 

Consider the Tropic of Capricorn (23S).  All of the following questions refer to this tropic.  You can compare conditions there to those elsewhere, but insure that you clearly state what happens at the equator and why this happens.

        (3) Which is greater at the top of the atmosphere, the amount of solar energy going downward, or the amount of energy going back out to space?  Why is this?

  

        (2) How is the incoming energy different than the outgoing energy, in addition to the relative amounts?

  

         (3) Over the course of the year, when will the amount of energy coming in be greatest?  When will it be the least?  Why?

  

         (3) What kinds of winds are found there, and what causes the winds to blow this way?

  

        (2) What is the typical air pressure found at this location, and why is this the case?

  

        (3) If you had to characterize the climate at this location, what would be the most important characteristics?  What causes this?

 

 


 

SO286, Fall 2006

Quiz 3

 

(3) Where are the major mountain belts of the world and why are they there?  Include both the actual locations (continents or countries) and the reasons/processes they are located there.

 

(2) Why do we use both magnitudes (Richter) and intensities (Mercalli) to measure earthquakes?  What is the difference between the two scales?

 

 

(3) What is the difference between shield volcanoes and stratovolcanoes or composite cones?  Discuss their dangers to people, size and shape, and plate settings.

 

(2) What is the difference between continental and oceanic crust, and hoes dies this affect the hypsometry of the earth?


The climographs on the quiz did not have the locations, stations names, or Koppen classification on the figure.

 

(4) The figure below shows climographs for three locations.  Discuss any similarities and differences you see among the three locations, and what you think accounts for them.

 

(3) The figure below shows climographs for two locations.  Is there any possibility that the two locations could be at the same latitude?  Why or why not?

 

 

(3) Could the climograph below be from a location in the United States ?  If so, where would it be, and what would be the single most important aspect used to classify its climate?



SO286, Fall 2006

Quiz 4

 

 

(2) The diagram above shows cross sections through two valleys.  What is different about the two valleys, and what processes cause the differences?

   

(3) Can we discuss glacial landforms without considering the wind and running water?  Defend your answer with specific examples.

   

(3) What is an alluvial fan?  Does it share any similarities to a delta?

 

(3) How do sand grains move over a dune?  How does this affect the shape of a dune, and can we see this if the dune turns into sandstone?

 

(3) What you consider the major difference between coastal features seen on the US east and west coasts?  Can you relate the difference to plate tectonics?

 

(6) Very briefly define 3 of the following 5 terms:  

  1. Pleistocene:

  2. Spit:

  3. Mangrove:

  4. Permafrost:

  5. Desert pavement: