SO262, Physical Geography

Exam 1, Fall 2012

 

Definitions (1 sentence)

10@ 4 points each

40

 

Short answer

6 @ 10 points

60

 

Total

 

100

 

 

Read the directions carefully. You have a selection of questions for the definitions.

Quality of your answers is important. For full credit you should use correct terminology, and show that you understand the concepts involved.

 

All work on this exam is individual. You may not any materials (books, notes, computers, calculators), and you may not use IM, texting, talking, or any other means to communicate with other individuals.

 

 

On climographs like this, the red curve, with scale on the left, is temperature.  The blue bar graph, with scale on the right, is precipitation.

 

Red comments are not complete answers, but key points that many students missed and were used for post test review.


Definitions: define 10 of the 12 terms with a concise sentence that clearly shows your understanding of the term, and why it is relevant in physical geography: Each is worth 4 points.

 

1.      Albedo

2.      Artesian aquifer  6 skips  pressurized

3.      Cumulonimbus clouds

4.      Cyclone low

5.      GIS

6.      Gyre: 4 skips circular flow, warm on west side of ocean basin , cold on east side

7.      Insolation

8.      Monsoon seasonal reversal of winds, with dry and wet seasons

9.      Normal lapse rate

10.  Physical geography spatial

11.  Thermal infrared radiation

12.  Water table 4 skips

Verify that only answered 10 of the 12 terms. You will have to answer all the remaining questions.



These three stations occur at the same latitude, in the same continent. They are arranged from west (left) to east (right).  They are from Oregon, but that was not on the text.

 

(2) Which hemisphere, and what approximate latitude do they occur, and why do you think this is the case?

 

 

 

 

(4) Discuss two factors that create the trends you see in the temperature graphs.

 

Cold currents on the west coast, and continentality

 

(4) Discuss two factors that create the trends you see in the precipitation graphs.

 

Moist maritime air along the coast, and rain shadows as you move inland.

 



(6) The two maps above show the wind patterns affecting Spain in January and July (map on next page highlights Spain). There is a large pressure system in the SW portion of the map. Is it a high or a low pressure system, and how can you tell? What will be the vertical motion of the air in this vicinity, and will it be a rainy region? Insure that you explain the processes involved, and do not just make a lucky guess.

 

Azores High

 



 

(6)Where in Spain do you think the graph above could be from? Discuss what the two curves tell, and relate your choice to the wind patterns on the previous page, and why the winds would lead to the differences between January and July.


Latitude: 43.100 Longitude: -8.790 which is in the NW corner.  In January it gets SW winds bringing in mT air, whereas in July it get N winds brings in dry cP air.  Rain pattern here is actually very similar to coastal Oregon in the previous question.

 


 

This was Figure 3.11 of the text.

 

(6) What does this graph show, and is there a good reason for it to be turned on its side?



(4) If there were no ozone in the atmosphere, how would the vertical temperature in the atmosphere change? Sketch the actual profile, and then discuss why it would change.

 

 


 

 

(4) Which will lead to a warmer Arctic Ocean: complete sea ice coverage, or completely open water? Why will this be the case?

 

 

(4) Which will lead to greater atmospheric warming over the Arctic Ocean: complete sea ice coverage, or completely open water? Why will this be the case?

 

 


 

 

(4) If you wanted 24 hours of daylight, could you go somewhere to find it over Christmas break (Dec 21)? Does this day have a special name?

 

(4) If you wanted 12 hours of daylight, could you go somewhere to find it over spring leave (21 March)? Does this day have a special name?

 

(2) If you wanted 12 hours of daylight, could you go somewhere to find it for Thanksgiving (21 November)?

 



 

(10) This map shows Svalbard/Spitsbergen, an island claimed by both Norway and Russia. The map covers about 600x540 km.

 



Labeled climographs