Animations for the March 2011 Japan Tsunami and Earthquake

General notes on running time animations

Animation in Google Earth for 9.0 March 2011 Japan earthquake sequence.  Data from USGS, animated by Prof. Peter Guth. 

You will probably have to adjust the width of the active time in the time-slider, and then start the animation.  The specifics of this change with every release of Google Earth.

Animation in Google Earth for magnitude 8.8 March 2010 Chile earthquake sequence.  Data from USGS, animated by Prof. Peter Guth.

You will probably have to adjust the width of the active time in the time-slider, and then start the animation.  The specifics of this change with every release of Google Earth.

Animation in Google Earth for magnitude 9.1 December 2004 Indonesia earthquake sequence.  Data from USGS, animated by Prof. Peter Guth.

You will probably have to adjust the width of the active time in the timeslider, and then start the animation.  The specifics of this change with every release of Google Earth.

 

USGS Plate Boundaries.  These have been extracted from the KML displays of current seismic activity from USGS.  The animations above can show any desired time period.
Megathrust animation on Youtube.

Courtesy Professor Miho Aoki, University of Alaska-Fairbanks Art Department, University of Alaska-Fairbanks

Propagation of the March 11, 2011 Honshu tsunami and maximum amplitude plot were computed with the NOAA forecast method using MOST model with the tsunami source inferred from DARTŪ data. From the NOAA Center for Tsunami Research, located at NOAA PMEL in Seattle, WA.

New York Times interactive before and after satellite imagery.

These allow you to swipe a slide across the screen, and compare the before and after satellite images.