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The Organization, Administration and Ship's Regulations of the United States Ship Idaho, 1934-1935: Finding Aid

Published in April 2020

Summary Information

  • Publisher: United States Naval Academy. Special Collections & Archives.
  • Publisher Address:
    589 McNair Road
    Annapolis, Maryland 21402-5029, USA
    Phone: 410-293-6917
    https://www.usna.edu/Library/sca/index.php
  • Call number: MS 87
  • Location: Special Collections & Archives Department - Manuscripts
  • Title: The Organization, Administration and Ship's Regulations of the United States Ship Idaho
  • Dates: 1934-1935
  • Size: 0.3 linear feet
  • Container Summary: 1 volume of 539 leaves
  • Creator: Idaho (Battleship : BB-42)
  • Language(s) of material: English
  • Abstract: U.S.S. Idaho was a United States Navy New Mexico Class battleship. The Organization, Administration and Ship's Regulations of the United States Ship Idaho spans from 1934 to 1935. The volume, compiled by Idaho's Executive Officer L. Jordan, Jr., and approved by Commanding Officer Forde A. Todd, consists of the Idaho's mission statement, various procedural bills, and ship's regulations. The volume also includes illustrations for stowage plans, mooring, towing operations, and recovery of planes at sea.

History of U.S.S. Idaho (Battleship: BB-42)

The fourth U.S.S. Idaho (Battleship: BB-42) was launched by New York Shipbuilding in Camden, New Jersey, on June 30, 1917 and commissioned on March 24, 1919, Captain C. T. Vogelgesang in command.

Following her shakedown, Idaho received President Pessoa of Brazil for a voyage to Rio de Janeiro, arriving in Rio on July 17, 1919. From there, she sailed to California to join the Pacific Fleet in training exercises and reviews, including a Fleet Review by President Wilson on September 13, 1919. In 1920 the battleship carried Secretary Daniels and the Secretary of the Interior on an inspection tour of Alaska. Upon her return from Alaska on July 22, 1920, Idaho resumed fleet maneuvers and various ceremonies out of California until 1925, including a fleet review held by President Harding in Seattle in 1923. The battleship sailed on April 15, 1925 for Hawaii, participated in war games until July 1, and then got underway for Samoa, Australia, and New Zealand. On the return voyage, Idaho embarked Commander John Rodgers and his seaplane crew after their attempt to fly to Hawaii, arriving San Francisco on September 24, 1925.

For the next six years Idaho operated out of San Pedro on training and readiness operations off California and in the Caribbean. She sailed from San Pedro on September 7, 1931 for the East Coast, entering Norfolk Navy Yard for modernization from September 30, 1931 until October 9, 1934. After shakedown in the Caribbean, she returned to her home port in San Pedro on April 17, 1935. With war approaching in the Pacific, Idaho carried out fleet tactics and gunnery exercises regularly until July 1, 1940. She then sailed from Pearl Harbor for Hampton Roads on June 6, 1941 to perform Atlantic neutrality patrol. She moved to Iceland in September to protect American advance bases and was on station there when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.

Two days after Pearl Harbor, Idaho and sister ship Mississippi departed Iceland to join the Pacific Fleet, arriving at San Francisco on January 31, 1942. She conducted additional battle exercises until October 1942, when she entered Puget Sound Navy Yard for weapons upgrades. Following more battle exercises, Idaho sailed on April 7, 1943 for operations in the Aleutians, where she was flagship of the bombardment and patrol force, supporting landings at Attu on May 11, 1943 and the assault on Kiska on August 15.

Idaho returned to San Francisco on September 7, 1943 to prepare for operations in the South Pacific. She arrived off Makin Atoll on November 20 to support the fighting ashore, remaining in the Gilberts until sailing for Pearl Harbor December 5, 1943. She then joined the invasion of the Marshalls, arriving off Kwajalein on January 31, 1944 and bombarding Japanese positions until February 5. After replenishing at Majuro, she bombarded other islands in the group, then moved to New Ireland for a diversionary bombardment on March 20. On June 14, she joined the pre-invasion bombardment of Saipan, then moved to Guam for other bombardment assignments. Duty protecting the transport area and reserve troop convoys during the Battle of the Philippine Sea from June 19 to 21 was followed by the pre-invasion bombardment of Guam on July 12.

Idaho retired to Eniwetok on August 2, 1944, then continued to Espiritu Santo to enter floating dry dock for repairs. Idaho moved to Peleliu on September 12 for bombardment duty, remaining there until September 24 to support the Marines. She then sailed for Manus and eventually to Bremerton, Washington, where she arrived for repairs October 22, 1944.

Sailing from San Diego on January 20, 1945 to join a battleship group at Pearl Harbor, Idaho steamed from the Marianas on February 14 for the invasion of Iwo Jima. She remained off Iwo Jima until March 7, when she got underway for Ulithi. Idaho then sailed for Okinawa on March 21, 1945, where she began bombardment operations on March 25, with the landings beginning on April 1. In a wave of counterattacks on April 12, she shot down five kamikazes before suffering damage from a near-miss. After temporary repairs she sailed for Guam on April 20.

Permanent repairs completed, she returned to Okinawa on May 22 to resume fire support. Idaho remained until June 20, 1945, then sailed for battle maneuvers in Leyte Gulf until hostilities ceased on August 15, 1945. Idaho entered Tokyo Bay with occupation troops on August 27, and witnessed the signing of the surrender on board Missouri on September 2. Four days later she began the voyage home, arriving at Norfolk on October 16, 1945. She decommissioned on July 3, 1946 and was placed in reserve until sold for scrap on November 24, 1947 to Lipsett Inc., of New York City.

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Description of Contents

The Organization, Administration and Ship's Regulations of the United States Ship Idaho, comprising 0.3 linear feet of documentation in a single volume of 539 leaves, spans from 1934 to 1935. The volume, compiled by Idaho's Executive Officer L. Jordan, Jr., and approved by Commanding Officer Forde A. Todd, consists of the Idaho's mission statement, various procedural bills, and ship's regulations. The volume also includes illustrations for stowage plans, mooring, towing operations, and recovery of planes at sea.

The volume consists of over thirty subsections, including: Mission and policy; Ship's administrative organization; Assignment of crew to divisions; Assignment of deck spaces; Berthing and stowage; Messing; Cleaning and upkeep; Duty bill; Routine bill; Ship control; Fueling; Provisioning; Boat bill; Welfare and service; General information re: action bills; Readiness for action bill; Paravane bill; Darken ship bill; Battle casualty bill; Gas defense bill; Procedure at emergencies; Fire bill; Collision bill; Abandon ship bill; Fire and rescue bill and demolition party; Plane crash bill; Man overboard bill; Landing force bill; Communications; Correspondence; Post office; Full dress ship; Discipline and personnel; Health, hygiene, and first aid; and Ship's regulations.

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Arrangement

The Organization, Administration and Ship's Regulations of the United States Ship Idaho comprises a single volume.

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Access and Use

Access

Patron use restricted to microfilm.

Copyright and Permission

The Organization, Administration and Ship's Regulations of the United States Ship Idaho are the physical property of Nimitz Library. Copyright belongs to the authors or creators of the works, or their legal representatives. For further information, consult the Head, Special Collections & Archives.

It is the responsibility of the researcher to secure written permission to publish, reprint, or reproduce material from Special Collections & Archives. The researcher assumes responsibility for infringement of copyright or literary or publication rights. Please contact the Head, Special Collections & Archives for permission to publish and for further information.

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Acquisition and Appraisal

Provenance and Acquisition

Gift of Captain Forde A. Todd in 1937. Accession No. 85759.

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Related Materials

Location of Copies or Alternate Formats

This collection also available on microfilm.

Related Archival Material

Official logbooks of U.S.S. Idaho may be available in Logbooks of U.S. Navy Ships, ca. 1801 - 1940, Record Group 24: Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, 1798-2007 at the National Archives and Records Administration.

Materials Cataloged Separately

No materials have been removed from this collection and cataloged separately.

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Processing and Other Information

Preferred Citation

The Organization, Administration and Ship's Regulations of the United States Ship Idaho, MS 87

Special Collections & Archives Department

Nimitz Library

United States Naval Academy

Selected Bibliography

The following sources were consulted during preparation of the biographical note:

"Idaho IV (BB-42)." Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Washington: Naval History and Heritage Command, 2015, https://www.history.navy.mil/research/histories/ship-histories/danfs/i/idaho-iv.html.

Processing Information

This collection was processed by Mary R. Catalfamo. Finding aid written by David D'Onofrio in April 2020.

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Subject Headings

These materials have been indexed in the Naval Academy Library online catalog using the following terms. Those seeking related materials should search under these terms.

Name and Subject Terms

  • Idaho (Battleship : BB-42)
  • Todd, Forde A.
  • United States. Navy -- History -- 20th century -- Sources
  • United States. Navy -- Regulations

Genre Terms

  • Manuscripts
  • Ships' logs
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Contents List

Box 1 Folder 1

The Organization, Administration and Ship's Regulations of the United States Ship Idaho, 1934-1935

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