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Mathematics Department

Applied Math Seminar

Fall 2021

All talks are from 12:00-1:00 p.m. in the Seminar Room CH351, unless otherwise specified.

  • Nov
    19
  • FILSIM: A Probabilistic Rapid Planning Tool for Beach Nourishment Management
    Anna Warluga
    USNA NAOE

    View Abstract

    The vulnerability of coastal communities to episodic storms, long-term erosion, and sea level rise is closely tied to the spatial and temporal evolution of beaches owing to natural processes and management practices. However, current methods for planning beach nourishment projects require major investments of time, capital, and user training. FILSIM is a computational planning-level tool in development to determine optimal beach nourishment practices based on analytical and probabilistic simulations of fill geometry, hydrodynamics, morphological beach profile evolution, and inland damages. The intended application of FILSIM is as a first-level, rapid investigation into multiple beach nourishment alternatives (e.g., renourishment intervals, fill geometry, emergency response criteria) in order to identify viable solutions that can be developed further using in-depth models, such as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Beach-fx.
  • Nov
    12
  • Mathematical Modeling and Fitting for Measurement of Nanoscale Thermal Transport
    Brian Donovan
    USNA Physics
    Time: 12:00 PM

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    Heat flow on microelectronics-relevant size scales does not always obey bulk thermal transport dynamics. In order to measure parameters like the thermal conductivity of a 10 nm thick film or the thermal conductance between a transistor and a metal contact we need advanced characterization tools that have resolution to nanoscale dimensions. The state of the art technique used to make these measurements, Time Domain Thermoreflectance (TDTR), relies on ultra-fast lasers concentrated in micrometer sized spots. We directly measure changes in reflectance of a multilayer material. To bridge that measurement back to interesting thermal properties, we utilize a number of mathematical models and fitting of a temporal decay in temperature. These mathematical tools are so integral to this measurement that Nanoscale Thermal Physicists often refer to TDTR as a way to directly measure thermal properties. As we push this measurement technique to new systems at the bounds of its sensitivity it makes sense to revisit our understanding of these mathematical tools and make sure we are actually "measuring" what we think we are measuring.
  • Nov
    05
  • On the stability of a self-propelled swarm system with linear coupling
    Kostya Medynets
    USNA Math
    Location: CH351
    Time: 12:00 PM
  • Oct
    22
  • Singularities in Spacetimes: Black Holes, Big Bangs, and Cosmic Strings
    Debbie Konkowski
    USNA Math
    Location: CH351
    Time: 12:00 PM

    View Abstract

    Ever wondered about solutions to Einstein’s equation? The spacetimes that describe the gravitational effects of all objects. Objects that range from everyday matter to mini- and monster- black holes to the universe itself. Objects whose models are often based on singularities — everything from infinite density and infinite curvature regions to topological points similar to the tip of a 2D cone. Come to this talk. I will introduce the basics of general relativity and singularities in general relativistic spacetimes. Both classical and quantum singularities will be discussed. Accessible to any STEM professional.
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